Global Health

Why Global Health?

Global Health Student Ambassadors

Kate FenskeName: Kate Fenske ’23
Pronouns: She/her
Email: [email protected]
Major: Integrative Science (Pre-public health)
Minors: Political Science, Nutrition

I chose to be involved with global health opportunities at CSB+SJU because I want to combine the different aspects of public policy, healthcare, and science in order to shape my future into something that makes a difference. Everything from the environment we live in, politicians we vote for, things we eat, and basic access to necessities impact population health, so taking an interdisciplinary approach to healthcare instead of focusing solely on clinical settings is important to reshaping attitudes towards health. CSB+SJU does a fantastic job providing experiential learning opportunities to students, whether that be through medical service trips, study abroad programs, assistance for attending a conference, undergraduate research, or getting students inside clinical settings so that they have the ability to learn both inside and outside of a classroom.

Jack AdamietzName: Jack Adamietz ’23
Pronouns: He/him
Email: [email protected]
Major: Biochemistry (Pre-medicine)
Minor: Global Health

A Global Health minor allows me to widen my view on what health means and how it impacts cultures from across the world to our local community. The minor also adds another dimension to my major and pre-medicine track to see health in various departments (Sociology, History, Nutrition, etc.) which gives me the opportunity to see multiple perspectives. Feel free to email me regarding any questions about the Global Health program, classes, or opportunities available!

Annika
Name: Annika Gothmann ’24
Pronouns: She/her
Email: [email protected]
Major: Sociology (Pre-public health)
Minors: Hispanic Studies and Global Health

I chose to study global health because I have always been interested in health care and learning about different cultures, and I also have a strong passion for social justice. Studying global health is the perfect way to combine my interests and has led me to so many opportunities that I would not have had otherwise. It has also given me a strong community of students and faculty that are also passionate about global health.

Global Health Alumni Ambassadors

Michael GarberName: Michael Garber
Pronouns: He/him
Email: [email protected]
Major: Biology
Minor: Psychology
Graduate Degree: Master of Public Health from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health; Major in Community Health Promotion, Minor in Environmental Health
Current Job: Community Health Specialist (Scott County Public Health Department - Disease Prevention and Control)

I chose to go into Public Health/Global Health because it impacts the lives around us as well as everyone in the world. Public Health initiatives can help better the lives of everyone now and generations to come.

Marleny Huerta-ApancoName: Marleny Huerta-Apanco
Pronouns: She/her
Email: [email protected]
Major: Psychology
Graduate degree: Master of Public Health from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health; Major in Community Health Promotion, Minors in Public Policy and Health Equity
Current Job: Community Outreach Officer (Scott County Administration)

I love public/global health because it targets the systemic inequities that intersect and impact everyone's health and well-being. I think both global/public health are rooted in social justice and about bringing a voice to communities that are overlooked and underserved. 

Megan ChristofieldName: Megan Christofield
Pronouns: She/her
Email: [email protected]
Major: Peace Studies
Graduate degree: Master of Public Health from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health; Concentration in Women’s and Reproductive Health
Current Job: Senior Technical Advisor, Family Planning (Jhpiego)

As a Peace Studies major at CSB and SJU, I was struck by the concept of positive peace (ie. an absence of structural violence) and at the same time was interested in the ways that a person’s health is impacted by systemic structural factors like where they live, their access to healthcare, and any exploitation or marginalization to which they and their community may have been subject. This intersection of health and justice is what brought me to public health. And, with sexual and reproductive health being central to the lives of all people, I was drawn towards working towards universal contraceptive access.

College of Saint Benedict
Saint John’s University

Ellen Block, Ph.D.
Sociology Department
SJU Simons Hall 118
320-363-3193