Fall 2019 Course Schedule

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Doctrine |Scripture |Languages |Th.M Seminar |Pastoral Theology |History of Christianity |Moral |Spirituality and Monastic Studies | Comprehensive Exams |  Field Education and Ministry Portfolio | Liturgy |  Liturgical Music |  Online Courses |

DOCTRINE

Augustine, Aquinas, Luther

Shawn Colberg | DOCT 468 |

8:00 - 11:10am (M)

Few thinkers have exercised greater influence over the Christian theological tradition than Augustine of Hippo, Thomas Aquinas, and Martin Luther.  This course will survey and examine the primary contributions of these authors including the way in which their thought has shaped the present state of Christian doctrine.  The course will explore each thinker’s context and biography; the central theological debates and questions of their time, and common topics among the three thinkers including (1) Christology (2) salvation, (3) sacraments, and (4) Christian life.  Students will have the opportunity to explore how these thinkers engage the past and remain relevant for theology and pastoral ministry today.  Cross listed with HCHR 468.

Ecclesiology

Kristin Colberg | DOCT 408 |

8:00-11:10 AM (W)

This course examines the nature and structure of the Roman Catholic Church from its apostolic origins to the present. Various models used in understanding the Church will be studied (e.g. the Church as communion, the Church as sacrament, etc.). The local and universal nature of the Church, and issues related to magisterium, authority, evangelization, ministry, and missiology will be discussed. 

Sacrament and Worship

Benjamin Durheim | DOCT 424 |

1:15-4:25 PM  (M)
Also Synchronous

The roots of Christian worship in symbol, language, and social dynamics. Theological reflection on the sacramental life in the Church. Contemporary approaches to a theology of sacrament especially in relation to Trinitarian, theology, Christology, Pneumatology, Christian anthropology, and ecclesiology. Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus.  Cross Listed with LTGY 424.


SCRIPTURE

New Testament Greek I

Morgan King | SSNT 401 |

9:10-10:05 AM  (MWF)

The instruction emphasizes reading Comprehension of New Testament Greek, with the aid of a dictionary. It includes the study of grammar with an eye towards its practical application. Biblical resources will be utilized for reading proficiency preparation. Graded A-F or pass/fail.

Gospel of Matthew

Michael Patella, OSB | SSNT 417 |

8:00-11:10 AM  (W)
Also Synchronous

Extensive investigation of the Gospel of Matthew within its theological, social, and historical context.  Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus.

Biblical Hebrew

David Calabro | SSOT 401 | TBA -- available with adequate student interest. |

Schedule TBA

This course guides students through the basics of Hebrew grammar: alphabet, pronunciation, nouns, verbs, adjectives, prepositions. Attention is weighted more toward learning the morphology of verbs, but students will also learn the basics of Hebrew syntax. Students will be able to read selected verses and texts from the Hebrew Bible as the semester progresses.

Pentateuch

Dale Launderville, OSB | SSOT 410 |

6:00-9:15 PM  (M) Also Synchronous

Survey of the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy in the Hebrew Bible, introducing the student to their content, the traditions of interpretation and the methods employed in their exegesis. Themes of creating, liberating, and covenanting are emphasized. Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus.


LANGUAGES

Reading Latin I

Scott Richardson | LANG 401 |

10:20 - 11:15 AM (MWF)

An overview of the grammatical structure of the language and practice in reading. Ecclesiastical resources will be utilized for reading proficiency preparation. Graded pass/fail.

Reading German I 

Charles Bobertz | LANG 405 |

TBA

An overview of the grammatical structure of the language and practice in reading. Ecclesiastical resources will be utilized for reading proficiency preparation. Graded pass/fail.


ThM SEMINAR

ThM Seminar

Charles Bobertz | THY 465 |

TBA

The ThM research seminar is designed to direct and guide students in advanced theological research in preparation for writing a thesis. Students may prepare the thesis proposal in the course, or if approved, can begin writing the thesis. Students will be engaged in dialogue and critique of each others' work in order to enhance understanding of theological research and writing. The proposal will contain: a thesis statement, a description of the project with a brief summary of the positions and the lines of argument to be developed; a tentative outline, a preliminary bibliography of primary and secondary sources. The bibliography will also include sources in the ancient and/or modern language being utilized in the thesis.


PASTORAL THEOLOGY

Pastoral Care: Grief/Illness/Healing

Kathleen Cahalan | PTHM 409 |

6:00-9:15 PM  (TH)

Pastoral care is the ministry of compassion for the well-being of persons and communities. Traditionally the ministry has included four dimensions of care: healing, guiding, sustaining, and reconciling. This class focuses on healing and sustaining in the midst of loss, grief, illness, dying, and elder care and is grounded in a theology of Christ the healer and good shepherd.

Theology and Practice of Ministry

Jeffrey Kaster | PTHM 405 |

1:15 - 4:25pm (M) Also Synchronous

Utilizing practical theology methodology, this course introduces students to theological foundations for ministry, including historical and contemporary theologies of ordained and lay ministry. Students will explore the vocational call to ministry as well as the spiritual, human, and pastoral foundations for ministry. Finally, students will identify the theological principles that are foundational to their ministerial leadership. Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus. 

Community Leadership

Bill Cahoy | PTHM 468 |

Asynchronous

While some communities seem to form spontaneously, most require careful attention and consistent work in order to put down roots and thrive. This is the challenge of pastoral leadership. Outcomes for the course include identifying the principles that frame community as a theological, pastoral, and socio-cultural reality; learn and practice a model of gift discernment related to leaders and community members; create a framework for applying the functions of pastoral ministry to building and sustaining community life; articulate one’s personal vision of leadership for the sake of community; and exploration of the impact of culture, ethnicity, place, and mission on forming communities.

Parish Administration

Barbara Sutton | PTHM 450 |

9:00 AM - 3:00PM (Saturdays) + WEB
September 14; October 19;  November 2; November 23, December 7 

This course allows students to explore the theology and practice of administration in relationship to: leadership theory, parish governance, human resources, financial systems, facility management, office services, technology management, and conflict management.


HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY

History of Christianity I 

Charles Bobertz | HCHR 402 |

1:15-4:25 PM (W)
Also Synchronous

This course is an introductory survey of theology, studying representative texts from the pre-Christian era to the Reformation (100 BCE to 1650). Students will examine figures and issues selected from various historical periods.   Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus. 

Augustine, Aquinas, Luther

Shawn Colberg | HCHR 468 |

8:00 - 11:10am (M)

Few thinkers have exercised greater influence over the Christian theological tradition than Augustine of Hippo, Thomas Aquinas, and Martin Luther.  This course will survey and examine the primary contributions of these authors including the way in which their thought has shaped the present state of Christian doctrine.  The course will explore each thinker’s context and biography; the central theological debates and questions of their time, and common topics among the three thinkers including (1) Christology (2) salvation, (3) sacraments, and (4) Christian life.  Students will have the opportunity to explore how these thinkers engage the past and remain relevant for theology and pastoral ministry today.  Cross listed with DOCT 468.


MORAL THEOLOGY

Structures of Sin and Grace

Daniel Finn | MORL 428 |

8:00-11:10 AM (T)
Also Synchronous

Nearly every human decision occurs within a social structure. This course will examine how moral agency is affected by social structures (the classroom, the parish, the global market, a monastery, the Tuesday evening bowling league, etc.). It will address the ways that structures alter our decisions – for good or ill – presenting restrictions and opportunities but not cancelling our freedom. Because the decisions of lay and clerical ministers in the Church likewise occur with structures, these insights will have important pastoral implications.  Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus.


SPIRITUALITY and MONASTIC STUDIES

Discernment in Prayer

Becky Van Ness | SPIR 437 |

6:00-8:30 PM (W)
September 4, September 18, October 9, October 23, November 6

An exploration of how our personal image of God evolves as we discern God's ways of being present to us in prayer and in life. By both studying and practicing discernment of spirits we can become sensitive to inner movements, understanding where they come from and where they lead us. The course includes an introduction to the practice of lectio divina applied to our lived experience.

Spiritual Exercises Across Time and Space

Chris Conway | SPIR 468 |

2:20-3:40 PM (T and TH)

From the deserts of North Africa to the forests of South India (and with several stops along the way), this course will offer a survey of Christian ascetical and contemplative traditions. The focus of the course will be on spiritual exercise(s), the intersection of theology and practice therein, and the transformations (perceptual, emotional, cognitive) that follow. Students will examine ‘the good life’ as conceived by these traditions as well as have opportunities to fashion and imagine ‘the good life’ as they understand and practice it.


COMPREHENSIVE EXAMS

Reading for Comprehensive Exams

TBA | THY 598 |


TBA

Comprehensive Exams

TBA | THY 599 |

TBA


FIELD EDUCATION and FORMATION

Clinical Pastoral Education

Barbara Sutton | PTHM 412 |

TBA

Students participate in a basic unit of an accredited Clinical Pastoral Education program.

Practicum/Theological Reflection

Chris Conway | PTHM 459 01A - 10A | TBA

August 26   | Approval of site placement

August 30, September 6, 13   | Orientation on-line

September 20   | Completed learning agreement due

Theological Reflection Dates   | TBD

December 13   | Case Study Presentation

Students work with an organization, project, or parish in the area of their ministerial interest. The supervised experience requires students to integrate theological competence with pastoral practice in developing vocational identity as a public minister, exploring issues of leadership, power and authority; and gaining facility in articulating the Christian faith and in fostering the development of faith with others. Students will reflect on the practice of ministry in theological reflection groups.

Focus Areas:

  • 01A General Parish
  • 02A Religious Education
  • 03A Social Ministry
  • 04A Liturgy
  • 05A Homiletics
  • 06A Pastoral Care
  • 07A Campus Ministry and Young Adult Ministry
  • 08A Spiritual Direction
  • 09A Ministry in the Margins
  • 10A Liturgical Music Ministry

Practicum / Theological Reflection:  Spiritual Direction Practicum

Becky Van Ness | PTHM 459 08A |

6:00-8:00 PM  (W)
August 28, September 26, October 30, December 4

Master of Arts Ministry Portfolio

Barbara | PTHM 598 | TBA

TBA

Students preparing for ministerial leadership through the MAM degree are required to document and self-assess their readiness for ministry by developing a Ministry Learning Portfolio and presenting it first to a peer group, and second to faculty review group. The Ministry Learning Portfolios are developed over the duration of one’s degree preparation. MAM degree students are required to present their Ministry Learning Portfolio in their last semester. Offered for S/U grading only.

Master of Divinity Ministry Portfolio

Barbara Sutton | PTHM 599 | TBA

TBA

Students preparing for ministerial leadership through the MDIV degree are required to document and self-assess their readiness for ministry by developing a Ministry Learning Portfolio and presenting it first to a peer group, and second to faculty review group. The Ministry Learning Portfolios are developed over the duration of one's degree preparation. MDIV LEM students present mid-degree (39-42 credits), MDIV seminarians (54-60 credits).


LITURGY

Introduction to Pastoral Liturgy

Johan Van Parys | LTGY 407 |

6:00-8:00 PM (Friday); 8:30 AM -12:30 PM (Saturday

September 6-7; September 20-21;  October 11-12

November 3 (At Basilica of St Mary, Minneapolis: 9:30am Mass; 10:30am tour of  Icon exhibit; 12:30-2:30pm class, 3:00pm Vespers for All Souls)

November 8-9

Through a critical reflection on the church's tradition of lex orandi, lex credendi, students will be introduced to the theory and practice of good liturgical celebration. Contemporary liturgical practice will be evaluated in its historical, cultural, and theological context. Students will learn how the historical development of Christian liturgy, its anthropological dimensions, and important church documents influence how we worship today.

Liturgy of the Hours

Anthony Ruff, OSB | LTGY 423 |

3:50-4:50PM  (T and TH)
Also Asynchronous

The Liturgy of the Hours historically and theologically considered. An analysis of the origins and evolution of the Office in the patristic and medieval periods. Study of the reformed Roman Liturgy of the Hours and of daily prayer in other traditions.

Sacrament and Worship

Benjamin Durheim | LTGY 424 |

1:15-4:25 PM  (M)
Also Synchronous

The roots of Christian worship in symbol, language, and social dynamics. Theological reflection on the sacramental life in the Church. Contemporary approaches to a theology of sacrament especially in relation to Trinitarian, theology, Christology, Pneumatology, Christian anthropology, and ecclesiology. Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus.  Cross Listed with DOCT 424.

Liturgical Music Seminar

Anthony Ruff, OSB | LTGY 501 |

10:30-11:00 AM (T) Skills Session (for Liturgical Music students, open to others)
8:00-9:30 AM (TH) Class Meeting

1 credit of classroom study integrated with 1 credit of participation in Chapel Choir. Students in the Seminar do not register separately for Chapel Choir. Foundational study of the theology, history, and official documents on music in worship. Principles for the ministry of cantors, choirs, instrumentalists, and ensembles. Practical aspects of music ministry and the management of a parish music program. Practica in liturgical planning of worship services in Emmaus Chapel, including (for Liturgical Music students) lab conducting of the Chapel Choir. Repeatable; offered in a four-semester sequence. Cross listed with LMUS 501.


LITURGICAL MUSIC

Liturgical Music Seminar

Anthony Ruff, OSB | LMUS 501 |

10:30-11:00 AM (T)  Skills Session (for Liturgical Music students, oepn to others)
8:00-9:30 AM  (TH)  Class Meeting

1 credit of classroom study integrated with 1 credit of participation in Chapel Choir. Students in the Seminar do not register separately for Chapel Choir. Foundational study of the theology, history, and official documents on music in worship. Principles for the ministry of cantors, choirs, instrumentalists, and ensembles. Practical aspects of music ministry and the management of a parish music program. Practica in liturgical planning of worship services in Emmaus Chapel, including (for Liturgical Music students) lab conducting of the Chapel Choir. Repeatable; offered in a four-semester sequence.  Cross listed with LTGY 501.

Chapel Choir

Beckuy Adams and Anthony Ruff, OSB | LMUS 412 |

9:45-11:15 AM (TH)  Chapel Choir Rehearsal

Optional: 11:00-11: 20 AM  (T)  Gregorian Chant Schola Rehearsal

A liturgical choir open to  graduate students and members of the larger community which sings regularly for worship in Emmaus Chapel. Choral music in a wide variety of styles including traditional/classisal, contemporary and world music.  Offered every semester. May be taken for 0 or 1 credit.

Conducting Techniques I

Axel Theimer | LMUS 430 |

1:00-2:45 pm (TH)

Individualized small-group lessons on the basics of conducting techniques such as beat patterns, cueing, expression and dynamics, and score preparation.

Applied Piano 

Robert Koopmann, OSB | LMUS 406 |

TBA

Students will develop technical skills and knowledge of performance practices at the graduate level, including the ability to play a large variety of repertoire fluently and with understanding. Secondary organ students will develop sufficient techniques and familiarity with the instrument to play knowledgeably and/or coach others in parish settings. Open to Liturgical Music students.

Applied Organ 

Kim Kasling | LMUS 407 |

TBA

Students will develop technical skills and knowledge of performance practices at the graduate level, including the ability to play a large variety of repertoire fluently and with understanding. Major works of significant periods and schools of organ literature will be studied and performed. Secondary organ students will develop sufficient techniques and familiarity with the instrument to play knowledgeably and/or coach others in parish settings. Open to Liturgical Music students.

Applied Voice 

Carolyn Finley | LMUS 408 |
Patricia Kent | LMUS 408 |

TBA

This course covers the fundamentals of singing and vocal pedagogy (breathing, efficient use of voice, diction, etc.) and addresses differing musical styles and the need to interpret the music based on the performance practices of given periods in music history. Voice majors will study and perform significant bodies of solo repertoire. Majors and secondary voice students will emphasize technique and pedagogical skills appropriate to roles as choral directors. Open to Liturgical Music students.

Applied Composition

Brian Campbell | LMUS 409 |

TBA

Individualized coaching in advanced composition of sacred music and music appropriate for liturgical performance. Work in various forms and styles is possible, depending on the needs and interests of individual students. Students should normally have a bachelor's degree in music or equivalent training and have significant experience in music composition. Open to Liturgical Music students.

Service Playing

Kim Kasling | LMUS 433 |

TBA

This course seeks to develop the qualified church organist as leader and enabler of the assembly's singing. The course will require high proficiency levels of assembly leadership and accompanimental skills (hymns, masses, psalm forms) as well as vocal and choral accompaniment. Students will also develop abilities in sight-reading, modulation, transposing, and extemporization.  Open to Liturgical Music students.

VoiceCare Basic

Axel Theimer | LMUS 436 |

TBA

LMUS student participants in VoiceCare Basic in Summer 2019 add this registration to their Fall 2019 schedule.


ONLINE COURSES

Synchronous-- Offered for remote participation– as well as on campus (distance students attend in real time, participating via video camera)

History of Christianity I 

Charles Bobertz | HCHR 402 |

1:15-4:25 PM  (W)

This course is an introductory survey of theology, studying representative texts from the pre-Christian era to the Reformation (100 BCE to 1650). Students will examine figures and issues selected from various historical periods.   Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus. 

Gospel of Matthew

Michael Patella, OSB | SSNT 417 |

8:00-11:10 AM  (W)

Extensive investigation of the Gospel of Matthew within its theological, social, and historical context.  Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus.

Pentateuch

Dale Launderville, OSB | SSOT 410 |

6:00-9:15 PM  (M)

 Survey of the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy in the Hebrew Bible, introducing the student to their content, the traditions of interpretation and the methods employed in their exegesis. Themes of creating, liberating, and covenanting are emphasized.  Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus.

Sacrament and Worship

Benjamin Durheim | DOCT 424 / LTGY 424 |

1:15-4:25 PM  (M)

The roots of Christian worship in symbol, language, and social dynamics. Theological reflection on the sacramental life in the Church. Contemporary approaches to a theology of sacrament especially in relation to Trinitarian, theology, Christology, Pneumatology, Christian anthropology, and ecclesiology.   Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus. 

The Theology and Practice of Ministry

Jeffrey Kaster | PTHM 405 |

1:15 - 4:25pm (M)

This course will explore the theological foundations of youth ministry, campus ministry, and parish young adult ministry within the broader conceptual framework of evangelization, catechesis, and initiation espoused by Pope Francis, the General Directory for Catechesis, the RCIA, Renewing the Vision, and Empowered by the Spirit: Campus Ministry Faces the Future. This course will foster the development of effective ministerial leadership practices addressing the current contextual context of "the rise of the nones." Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus.

Structures of Sin and Grace

Daniel Finn | MORL 428 |

8:00-11:10 AM (T)
Also Synchronous

Nearly every human decision occurs within a social structure. This course will examine how moral agency is affected by social structures (the classroom, the parish, the global market, a monastery, the Tuesday evening bowling league, etc.). It will address the ways that structures alter our decisions – for good or ill – presenting restrictions and opportunities but not cancelling our freedom. Because the decisions of lay and clerical ministers in the Church likewise occur with structures, these insights will have important pastoral implications.  Offered Synchronous for remote student participation, as well as on campus.


Asynchronous-- Students participate fully online through the CANVAS WEB Platform.

Community Leadership

Bill Cahoy | PTHM 468 |

TBA

While some communities seem to form spontaneously, most require careful attention and consistent work in order to put down roots and thrive. This is the challenge of pastoral leadership. Outcomes for the course include identifying the principles that frame community as a theological, pastoral, and socio-cultural reality; learn and practice a model of gift discernment related to leaders and community members; create a framework for applying the functions of pastoral ministry to building and sustaining community life; articulate one’s personal vision of leadership for the sake of community; and exploration of the impact of culture, ethnicity, place, and mission on forming communities.

Liturgy of the Hours

Anthony Ruff, OSB | LTGY 423 |

TBA

The Liturgy of the Hours historically and theologically considered. An analysis of the origins and evolution of the Office in the patristic and medieval periods. Study of the reformed Roman Liturgy of the Hours and of daily prayer in other traditions.