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Emily Lueck '15

What is the correlation between vitamin D levels, sprint times, and muscle recovery in division III college basketball players?

Research Question: What is the correlation between serum vitamin D levels, sprint times, and muscle recovery in Division II and III Collegiate Basketball Players?

Introduction: Winter indoor athletes have a greater risk of having low serum vitamin D concentrations. Overall, 73% of winter indoor athletes were vitamin D insufficient; basketball players were 94% vitamin D insufficient, and 57% were vitamin D deficient. Low serum vitamin D levels is associated with an impaired exercise performance.

Purpose: To determine if there is a correlation between serum vitamin D levels and muscle recovery in Division II and III Collegiate Basketball Players.

Methods: The cross-sectional study assessed 56 healthy basketball players (26 male/30 female) in the beginning of January.  Blood samples were taken via finger stick after participants completed a questionnaire about their supplement use, intake of vitamin D food sources, and use of a tanning bed. Muscle recovery was measured by two performance tests: three 20-meter sprints and three vertical jumps.  

Results: Mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D) concentration was 68 +37 nmol/L. Thirty-seven percent of participants were vitamin D sufficient, 54% vitamin D insufficient, and 9% were vitamin D deficient. Ninety percent of vitamin D sufficient either tanned once a week, consumed fatty fish or fortified milk, or took a daily vitamin D supplement. There was a significant positive correlation between participants' serum vitamin D levels and sprint times (p=.047). There was a significant negative correlation between participants' serum vitamin D levels and vertical jump (p=.001).

Conclusion: A high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency was identified among division II and III collegiate basketball players. Athletes competing indoors during the winter months should tan once a week, consume vitamin D dietary sources weekly, or consume a vitamin D supplement to be vitamin D sufficient. Individuals' serum vitamin D levels did not correlate with muscle recovery in this study.

Emily Lueck '15
Emily Lueck '15

To view Poster, click on link below:
Correlation Between Serum Vitamin D Levels, Sprint Times, and Muscle Recovery in Division 11 and Division 11 and 111 Collegiate Basketball Players
Research advisor: Amy Olson, PhD, RDN, LD