The Learning Goals

SCAFFOLDED LEARNING GOALS

There are twelve scaffolded learning goals listed in alphabetical order. (The goals are listed at the top; the outcomes are Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced.) See Table 1 for a curriculum map identifying the placement for each of the 12 scaffolded learning goals.

ANALYZING TEXTS: Elicit and construct meaning from texts.

Beginner: Students read or interpret a variety of texts for comprehension, adjusting strategies based on the genre, nature of the text and context of the assignment.

Intermediate: Students evaluate texts for significance, relevance to the studentsgoals, and make connections among texts and/or disciplines.

Advanced: Students integrate knowledge among different texts, including independently finding supplemental texts to help understand the main text(s).

COLLABORATION: Interact effectively in a group while incorporating diverse perspectives.

Beginner: Students identify the different roles in the group, engage group
members by acknowledging their contributions, articulate the importance of multiple and diverse perspectives in a group, and complete all individual tasks on time.

Intermediate: Students use group roles effectively, build constructively on the work of others, incorporate multiple perspectives into the work of the group, and produce independent work that advances the project.

Advanced: Students perform different roles appropriate to the context, are self-reflective about their own roles and contributions, build constructively on the work of others and encourage advanced participation by all group members, and leverage diverse perspectives of group members.

COMMON GOOD: Develop a conception of a moral life that incorporates concern for the common good.

Beginner: Students explain the moral dimensions of situations, perspectives, and actions in their lives and recognize that there are competing, yet legitimate, conceptions of what defines the common good.

Intermediate: Students evaluate different historical or contemporary situations, perspectives, or actions, giving reasons why some more effectively contribute to the common good. Their analyses demonstrate their understanding of the complexities of moral life and moral responsibilities on an individual and civic level.

Advanced: Students apply the moral understanding they have gained to articulate and defend some vision of a responsible life and character, and connect these to the common good. This vision demonstrates how complex values are embedded in everyday life and institutions.

GENDER: Examine the social construction of gender and related individual and systemic inequities.

Beginner: Students identify a diversity of gender identities. Students identify social and cultural factors that shape their own gender identities and how these factors influence their self- conception and worldview.

Intermediate: Students analyze historical and/or contemporary constructions of gender. Students analyze how factors such as race, ethnicity, age, class, sexuality, disability, religion, or nationality intersect with gender.

Advanced: Students analyze structural and systemic differences based on gender and articulate ways to address inequities.

INFORMATION LITERACY: Identify, evaluate, and responsibly use information.

Beginner: Students access appropriate information through common search strategies, accurately cite the source, and articulate the value of accurate citation.

Intermediate: Students locate relevant information using well-designed search strategies, evaluate and use appropriate and multiple resources, and articulate why using information has many ethical and legal implications.

Advanced: Students use well-designed search strategies to find information, evaluate and use appropriate and diverse resources, and follow the ethical and legal standards for their discipline.

METACOGNITION: Optimize one’s own thinking and learning processes.

Beginner: Students identify their intellectual abilities and dispositions, problem solving processes, and learning strategies.

Intermediate: Students reflect on the weaknesses and strengths of their intellectual abilities and dispositions, effectiveness of their problem solving processes, and efficiencies of their learning strategies.

Advanced: Students apply their metacognitive knowledge to improve their problem solving processes, and to strengthen learning strategies.

QUANTITATIVE REASONING: Solve quantitative problems and develop and communicate arguments supported by quantitative evidence. (Designationboth the beginner and intermediate will be met in the same course)

Beginner: Students describe and draw conclusions from quantitative arguments,recognizing that assumptions, errors, and fallacies may affect the argument’s validity.

Intermediate: Students construct an appropriate representation of data and perform calculations to interpret a situation, drawing appropriate inferences.

Advanced: Students create their own arguments supported by quantitative evidence andclearly communicate those arguments and assumptions that may impact the argument’svalidity.

RACE AND ETHNICITY: Examine the social construction of race and ethnicity and resulting inequities.

Beginner: Students identify factors that shape their racial and ethnic identities and explain how these factors influence their self- conception and relationships to their communities.

Intermediate: Students demonstrate how historical and/or contemporary constructions of race and/or ethnicity shape cultural rules and biases. Students analyze how factors such as gender, age, class, sexuality, disability, religion, or nationality intersect with race and/or ethnicity.

Advanced: Students critically analyze structural and systemic differences based on race and/or ethnicity and articulate ways to address inequities.

RELIGIOUS ENGAGEMENT: Analyze religious engagement with society.

Beginner: Students identify and explain one or more forms of religious engagement with the world.

Intermediate: Students analyze forms of religious engagement by drawing on sources that may come from a range of academic disciplines.

Advanced: Students evaluate forms of religious engagement in conversation with their primary academic disciplines or with their involvement in a campus, community, or professional project.

SPEAK: Construct ideas, opinions and information in appropriate oral forms.

Beginner: Students organize a presentation with a central message that is partially supported by relevant material(s). Delivery techniques make the presentation understandable, although students may appear tentative or uncomfortable.

Intermediate: Students organize a presentation with a clear central message that is consistent with relevant supporting material(s). Delivery techniques make the presentation interesting, and students appear comfortable.

Advanced: Students skillfully organize a cohesive presentation with a compelling central message, support it with relevant material(s) that establish their authority on the topic.

THEOLOGICAL REASONING: Think critically about sources, doctrines, and themes of the Christian tradition.

Beginner: Students identify elements of Christian theological sources, which may include scripture, practices, texts, or art forms. They explain a theological teaching, doctrine, or theme.

Intermediate: Students interpret theological sources and their contexts. They compare perspectives on a teaching, theme, or doctrine.

Advanced: Students demonstrate creative theological reasoning in evaluating contemporary social issues, conducting interdisciplinary research, or constructing their own theological argument.

WRITE: Construct ideas, opinions and information in appropriate written forms.

Beginner: Students are aware of the context, audience, and purpose of their writing and appropriately use content to explore their ideas. They organize and present the writing in ways that are appropriate, which includes relevant evidence to support ideas. The language is clear, but may include some errors.

Intermediate: Students demonstrate consideration of the context, audience, and purpose of their writing and use compelling content to clearly support ideas. The consistently organize their arguments using relevant evidence. The language is clear and straightforward, with few errors.

Advanced: Students demonstrate a thorough understanding of context, audience, and purpose and use relevant and compelling content. The language is clear, fluent and virtually error-free.