Fall 2021 Offerings

ART

  • ART 260 ART MOVES: ART HISTORY 1400-1850 (FA,AE) (4)
    15824 01M TR 9:35am PENGL-212 Brash, C

    This course is an introduction to art history from ca. 1400-1850. Although the course content focuses on art from Asia, Europe and North America, it is examined through the lens of global connections and how these connections transformed art around the world in this period. This course considers the movement of objects, ideas and technologies across space and through time. Each class period will focus on a number of issues, which will be introduced through specific examples of art. Any object may be examined from several points of view; as an independent work of art, as an example of a particular style developed within a chronological framework, or as a type which illustrates features associated with a certain locale, country, religious, political or social context.

  • ART 344 CONTEMPORARY CRITICAL THEORY (FA,AE) (4)
    12191 01T TR 2:20pm ART-102 ART-128 Brash, C

    This course examines in depth the major themes within modern and contemporary art theory and practice. Students will learn and analyze the works of seminal artists, art critics and theorists of the mid-20th century onward through reading, writing, and discussion. Fall. Prerequisite: 300. 

ETHICS

  • ETHS 390 ETHICS OF WAR (ES) (4)
    15343 03A TR 2:20pm SIMNS-G40 Siver, C
    Cross-listed with POLS 358B. JN or SN standing only

    If General Sherman was right that "war is hell," the concept of ethics seems completely irrelevant. However, as human society has evolved, numerous politicians, philosophers, and religious figures have agreed on the need for an ethics in war, even if they have not agreed on the content of those ethics. Students will be introduced to formal ethical frameworks and discover the dilemmas they encounter when applying these frameworks to real world situations. Students will compare how these ethical frameworks overlap and diverge from political values. We will debate particular dilemmas in warfare, including which authorities can declare war and when they are justified in doing so, what methods can be used in war, and what obligations both combatants and non-combatants have. Students will work with a basic ethics text supplemented by contemporary articles outlining modern dilemmas related to ethics of war.

 GLOBAL BUSINESS LEADERSHIP

  • GBUS 201 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT (4)
    14195 01A MWF 9:10am SIMNS-310 Yan, Q
    This class gives students a foundation in management theories and concepts. This course will help students improve their communication skills and practice problem solving, conflict resolution, strategic planning and decision making as an individual and in groups. Students will develop an understanding and relationship of the traditional functional areas of organizations; Marketing, Human Resources, Operations and Finance. The class setting will frequently utilize global business settings, cases and examples. Students will examine multiple ethical  perspectives and learn to utilize these perspectives as a context for decision making. For Non-GBUS majors.

  • GBUS 300 GLOBAL BUSINESS (4)
    13880 01A TR 9:35am SIMNS-G40 Moskowitz, S
    15732 02A TR 12:45pm SIMNS-G10 Moskowitz, S
    15834 03A MWF 1:50pm SIMNS-G40 Yan, Q
    This course covers the fundamental concepts, issues, and structure of 21st century global business. It explores the historical, cultural, economic, and political underpinnings of the basic themes of, and critical actors operating within international business today. The student learns about the nature of and relationships between the major components (or systems) that make up the international business system as a whole. Prerequisite GBUS 210, 220, 230, 240 or permission of instructor

  • GBUS 330 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR IN THE BAHAMIAN CONTEXT (4)
    15835 01A TR 9:35am SIMNS-310 Pembleton, D
    This course combines classroom learning at CSB/SJU during CD mod and ends with an experiential component abroad. This course is an inter-disciplinary examination of the international dimensions of organizational behavior. Course content includes topics such as cross-cultural management, cross-cultural communication, and global aspects of leadership, motivation, team management, and decision-making. The focus on this course will be on Bahamian culture, incorporating an international field experience to the Bahamas. There are no prerequisites for this course, although the course is limited to juniors and seniors. This course has an IC designation. Offered for A-F grading only.

CHINESE

  • CHIN 111 ELEMENTARY CHINESE I (4)
    10445 01A MWF 1:50pm QUAD-361 Danzeisen, L
    Introduction to the basic elements of the Chinese language. Practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including work with grammar, pronunciation, and culture.

  • CHIN 211 INTERMEDIATE CHINESE I (4)
    10446 01A MWF 10:40am Geng, Z
    Review and continued study of grammar together with additional training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. 211 and 212 emphasize Chinese culture and civilization. Satisfactory completion of CHIN 211 fulfills the global language proficiency requirement.

  • CHIN 311 ADVANCED CHINESE: CONVERSATION & COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE I (4)
    13331 01A MWF 2:10pm Geng, Z
    Designed to help students solidify and further their communicative and writing ability in Chinese through contact with various written styles of modern Chinese language. Advanced Chinese also provides an introduction to contemporary Chinese literature. 311 and 312 may be taken in either order.

  • CHIN 330 TOPICS IN CHINESE CULTURE (4)
    16409 01A MWF 1:00pm RICHA-P39 Geng, Z
    A study of specific elements or issues in Chinese culture. Topics include: Aesthetics in Chinese culture, Christian missions in China, and Being Chinese American. Taught in English.

 JAPANESE

  • JAPN 111 ELEMENTARY JAPANESE I (4)
    10443 01A MWF 9:30am HAB-119 Limpert, M
    14803 02A MWF 2:10pm HAB-102 Limpert, M
    Introduction to the basic structure of the Japanese language. Practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing, with a focus on an accurate command of grammar and culturally appropriate communication skills. 
  • JAPN 211 INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I (4)
    10444 01A MWF 10:40am HAB-119 Limpert, M
    Review and continued study of grammar together with additional training in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Satisfactory completion of JAPN 211 fulfills the global language proficiency requirement.

  • JAPN 311 ADVANCED JAPANESE LANGUAGE I (4)
    13500 01A MWF 11:50am HAB-102 Limpert, M
    Review and continued development of grammar together with development of skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing.

  • JAPN 341 BUSINESS/PROF. JAPAN (4)
    16379 01A MWF 11:50am Limpert, M
    Business Japanese reviews polite language (keigo) from the advanced Japanese language classes (311, 312) and expands its application for practical use in business settings. This includes proper workplace interactions, email correspondences, and culturally appropriate gestures and practices (such as the exchange of business cards). This course may be offered as a standalone, or crosslisted with other advanced Japanese courses, in which case learning material beyond the regular course textbooks will serve as supplement.

MUSIC

  • MUSC 152 EXPLORING WORLD MUSIC (FA,HE) (2)
    15674 01A CDMWF, 10:20am MUSIC-015 Campbell, B
    An introduction to the many kinds of musical expression practiced around the world through listening, reading and classroom discussion. Primary goals will include becoming acquainted with the musical practices of selected cultures, understanding the cultural contexts of diverse musical practices, and, through comparison with other cultures, becoming more aware of the roles music plays in our own lives and culture. No previous experience with music is necessary. Course offered for A-F grading only.

PEACE STUDIES

  • PCST 123 ISLAM IN THE USA: GENDER RACE AND ETHNICITY (CI) (4)
    15838 01A TR 8:20am BAC-A106 Armajani, J
    After introducing Islam, this course examines gender, race, and ethnicity, among Muslims in the United States. It analyzes American Muslims’ conceptions of gender, and those conceptions’ relationships with historical ideas about gender in Islam while examining the relationships between ethnicity and religiosity among the largest ethnic groups of Muslims in the United States which include Arabs and non-Arab Middle Easterners, South Asians, and African Americans. The course will examine the role of race among persons in those and other groups in the United States. The course will give attention to Somalis in Minnesota, virtually all of whom are Muslims, their religiosity, and the similar and dissimilar sociological patterns with respect to them and other Muslims in the United States with respect to gender, race, and ethnicity. This course has no prerequisites because it is a CSD1 course. Offered for A-F grading only. 
  • PCST 368Q MODERN ISLAM POLITICAL MOVEMENT (TU,TI) (4)
    15842 01A TR 2:40pm BAC-A106 Armajani, J
    After providing an introduction to the beliefs, practices, and history of Islam, this course will analyze some of the relationships between Islam and politics in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries among Islamist (or “fundamentalist Islamic groups”) in the Middle East, South Asia, and other parts of the world. Specifically, the course will examine the histories, ideologies, and structures of groups. This course will examine the religious, theological, and political, foundations of these groups while analyzing their work in education, literacy, social service to people in many sectors of societies (including the underprivileged), religious and political instruction, and community-building. The course will also explore the various perspectives of members of these groups and movements toward peace and violence as well as their religiously- and politically-based reasons for attacking various targets. Finally, the course will compare and contrast those Islamist trends with those represented by some liberal Muslims. Prerequisite THEO 111 or HONR 240A
  • PCST 368R ISLAM (TU, TI) (4)
    15841 01A TR 1:05pm BAC-A106 Armajani, J
    This course explores the history of Islam and its interpretations, as well as doctrines and practices among Muslims in various parts of the world. It examines the Quran and Hadith, and topics related to women and gender, Islamic law, and Islam and politics, and it examines the relationship between Islam and the Judeo-Christian tradition. Prerequisite: THEO 111 or HONR 240A

POLITICAL SCIENCE

  • POLS 121 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (SS,SW) (4)
    10855 02M MWF 11:30am SIMNS-G60 Siver, C
    Students learn about global issues through different theoretical lenses, including realism and liberalism. Using these lenses, students investigate international security, civil conflict, economic interactions, and the influence of globalization. They also examine the influence of important actors in the international arena, including states, intergovernmental organizations, and nongovernmental organizations. Students examine their understandings of culture and how it shapes understanding of concepts like human rights. This broad overview helps students have a better understanding of the world around them and how their worldview shapes their perceptions of international events. Every semester. 
  • POLS 358B ETHICS OF WAR (ES, CS) (4)
    15015 01A TR 2:20pm SIMNS-G40 Siver, C
    If General Sherman was right that "war is hell," the concept of ethics seems completely irrelevant. However, as human society has evolved, numerous politicians, philosophers, and religious figures have agreed on the need for an ethics in war, even if they have not agreed on the content of those ethics. Students will be introduced to formal ethical frameworks and discover the dilemmas they encounter when applying these frameworks to real world situations. Students will compare how these ethical frameworks overlap and diverge from political values. We will debate particular dilemmas in warfare, including which authorities can declare war and when they are justified in doing so, what methods can be used in war, and what obligations both combatants and non-combatants have. Students will work with a basic ethics text supplemented by contemporary articles outlining modern dilemmas related to ethics of war.

THEOLOGY

  • THEO 339F SONGS OF LOVE/FREEDOM (TU,TI) (4)
    15912 01A MWF 1:00pm HAB-118 Conway, C

    Songs of Love and Freedom (4) Songs of Love and Freedom will survey the spiritual practices and devotional traditions of Christianity and Hinduism as well as their transformative impact upon individuals and communities. Practices like yoga, meditation, lectio divina, and the Spiritual Exercises will be examined in both practice and theory. Devotional traditions embodied in the poems and songs of these traditions' mystics will be explored to see how experiences beyond words are nevertheless communicated. Finally, the class will highlight the transformative impact of these spiritual and devotional traditions as they are made manifest in the lives and communities of modern figures who strove and strive to live lives of love and freedom. Prerequisite THEO 111 or HONR 240A.