2018-2019 Honors Courses for First Year Students

Our professional advisors will select your courses for you your first semester at CSB/SJU. They will take into consideration the majors you are considering, the coursework you have previously completed, and what you plan to participate in at CSB/SJU. If you have questions about a specific major four-year plan or Academic Advising in general, please contact a professional Academic Advisor. Remember – your honors courses are not taken in addition to other Common Curriculum courses you will complete to graduate from CSB/SJU. Your honors courses replace them while fulfilling your graduation requirements. (The Common Curriculum code is in parenthesis following the course name.)

FALL 2018

HONR 220F: INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (SS), Dr. Ellen Block
This course will provide an introduction to the field of anthropology. Anthropology is a holistic and comparative study of human diversity. Students will examine cross-cultural examples to shed light on the all aspects of human life and culture from language and religion, to technology and medicine, to the study of our human and non-human ancestors.

HONR 250L - PHILOSOPHY OF HUMAN NATURE (HM), Dr. Erica Stonestreet
What are humans like? What is the purpose of human life? These basic questions can be answered from different points of view and focused on different aspects of being human. What does it mean to be a human animal? Are we fundamentally selfish? How should we live? What is the relationship between reason and emotion? What is a soul? How can human life be meaningful? This course is a survey designed to introduce philosophical ideas and modes of thought, with a central focus on problems arising from human nature. We will analyze and criticize topics that fall under three major aspects of the human condition: body, mind, and spirit. We’ll raise questions and discuss the implications of each topic for the meanings of our own lives, for how we ought to behave as individuals, and for how we should treat one another in order to build the best lives possible for ourselves.

HONR 210E – INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES (NS), Dr. Alicia Peterson
A project based introductory chemistry course in which students study how the structure of atoms, ions, and molecules determine their physical and chemical properties. Students build a progressive and linked understand of bonding, ionic and molecular geometry, and physical and chemical properties that emerge from structure, which will be applied to real world problems. This will be done with guided inquiry and problem-based learning. Must complete both HONR 210 & CHEM 201 (LAB) in order to earn the NS designation.

HONR 260A - PROBABILITY & STATISTICAL INFERENCE (MT), Dr. Anne Sinko
Graphs and charts, mean, median and other measures of location. Terminology and rules of elementary probability; normal distribution, random sampling, estimation of mean, standard deviation and proportions, correlation and regression, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses. Prerequisites: three years of college preparatory mathematics.

HONR 240A - THEOLOGICAL EXPLORATIONS: Bible, Faith and Science (TH/GE), Dr. Vincent Smiles
An exploration of Christian theology in the context of our science-dominated world.  Study and discussions will focus on: 1) texts from the Bible, with a view to understanding just what the Bible is (and has become) as a record of human experience and as divine revelation; 2) the mechanisms of emergence and evolution, by which the universe has produced galaxies, Bible and meaning; 3) how the Bible and its traditions relate with modern science; 4) how to think critically both about the Bible and modern theological controversies; 5) how biblical religions relate with other religions of the world; 6) feminist hermeneutics and theology; 7) how Church, Eucharist & Benedictine values challenge modern society.  This course has a ‘gender’ designation.  How issues of gender intersect with texts, issues and themes of the course will be prominent in our discussions. 

SPRING 2019 

HONR 220E – INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (SS), Dr. Linda Tennison
Prerequisite to all upper-division psychology courses. Survey of the major content areas of psychology, introducing the basic vocabulary, concepts, principles, and theories of the discipline. Specific topics include history and methods of psychology; biological bases of behavior; sensation and perception; learning and memory; cognition, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; lifespan development; personality; psychological disorders; psychological treatment/psychotherapy; and social psychology.
 
HONR 250K – EUROPEAN HISTORY FROM THE BLACK DEATH THROUGH THE FRENCH REVOLUTION (HM), Dr. Beth Wengler
Students will investigate how Europeans wrestled with tensions between traditionalism and change in art, religion, politics, and science between 1348-1800.  Highlights include examination of the religious revolution that rocked the western Christian church in the 16th century, investigation of scientific discoveries that challenged Europeans’ understanding of the world and their place in it, and analysis of new ideas about the political and social world put into action in one of the defining events of the modern age, the French Revolution.  
 
HONR 240A - THEOLOGICAL EXPLORATIONS: Bible, Faith and Science (TH/GE), Dr. Vincent Smiles
An exploration of Christian theology in the context of our science-dominated world.  Study and discussions will focus on: 1) texts from the Bible, with a view to understanding just what the Bible is (and has become) as a record of human experience and as divine revelation; 2) the mechanisms of emergence and evolution, by which the universe has produced galaxies, Bible and meaning; 3) how the Bible and its traditions relate with modern science; 4) how to think critically both about the Bible and modern theological controversies; 5) how biblical religions relate with other religions of the world; 6) feminist hermeneutics and theology; 7) how Church, Eucharist & Benedictine values challenge modern society.  This course has a ‘gender’ designation.  How issues of gender intersect with texts, issues and themes of the course will be prominent in our discussions.