Military Science

Department Chair: James Fischer

Faculty: Keith Arnold, Alberto DeJesus, Joey Errington, James Fischer, Derik Fussell, Harlan Grams, Robb Mattila, Joseph Peterson, Molly Weimann, John Zeitler

The Department of Military Science conducts the Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) program to prepare men and women to serve as Second Lieutenants in the United States Army. Students serve our nation in one of three components of the Army—Active, Reserve, National Guard—upon completion of a bachelor or graduate degree and completion of the ROTC program. Students serve in various career fields including the Nurse Corps, Aviation Branch, and Signal Branch to name a few. Students enrolled in Army ROTC have a wide variety of majors.

The Army ROTC develops leadership skills. The core coursework includes 16 to 26 credits in topics such as the art and science of leadership, ethics, values, integrity, honor, problem solving skills, responsibility, basic military skills, military history, physical training, and adventure training. Students register and earn academic credit for Army ROTC courses in the same manner as other elective courses in their college curriculum.

Programs

Three basic programs are available in the Department of Military Science for students to earn a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army.

Four-Year Program—The four-year program is divided into two parts—the basic course and the advanced course. The basic course is typically completed in the first two years of college. Except for scholarship cadets, the basic course is voluntary and all students are eligible. After completing the basic course, students that meet the physical and academic standards, and have demonstrated leadership potential, contract into the advanced course. The advanced course includes four concurrent semesters of coursework and the Leader Development Advanced Course (LDAC). LDAC is a paid five-week leadership course conducted at Fort Lewis, Washington, during the summer. Typically students attend LDAC during the summer after the first year of the advanced course.

Three-Year Program—The three-year program is designed for students who want to start ROTC as a sophomore. Students complete the basic course in one year instead of two. This method is referred to as compression. Students completing the basic course as compression students go on to contract in the advanced course as above.

Two-Year Program—The two-year program enable eligible students to contract in the advanced course at the time they are academic juniors or seniors, or graduate students with four semesters remaining before graduation. Eligible students are those with one or more of the following:

  • Prior service in the military.
  • Member of the National Guard or Reserve with basic training completed.
  • Completion of three or more years of Junior ROTC in high school.
  • Completion of the Army ROTC Leader’s Training Course (LTC).

Students who are members of the National Guard or Army Reserve can participate in the Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP), which provides additional income and the opportunity to serve in a leadership position in the student’s unit of choice.

Benefits

The Department of Military Science offers many benefits to students with or without military experience.
Personal Growth—The Department of Military Science gives students the opportunity to gain confidence, improve self-discipline, and build physical and mental toughness. The leadership experience gained by completion of the program gives students a marketable asset: leadership.

Scholarships—A wide variety of scholarships are available and application can be made at anytime during the year. Scholarships range from two to four years in duration with extensions possible for high demanding majors such as nursing or engineering. Scholarships provide full tuition, monthly stipend, and $900 per year for textbooks. Two-year scholarships are available for members of the National Guard and Army Reserve. These scholarships feature continued reserve duty after commissioning and guaranteed branching in the student’s unit. Scholarships for two to four years are also available and include duty in the Active Army after commissioning.

Guaranteed Job after Graduation—Upon commissioning, students have a full time job in the Active Army or part time job in the National Guard or Army Reserve. The military obligation of service is eight years after commissioning (four years Active Army and four years in the reserve component, or up to eight years in the National Guard or Army Reserve). The type of obligation is determined at the time of contracting in the advanced course and is tied to the type of scholarship. Cadets are selected for a specific branch depending on factors such as their interest, academic major, LDAC performance rating, and the needs of the Army.

Income—Students contracted in the advanced course and contracted scholarship students receive a stipend of $250 to $400 per month, depending upon the class, for up to ten months of the year. Students with prior service, SMP cadets, and members of the National Guard or Army Reserve may be eligible for Montgomery GI Bill (MGIB) benefits, financial assistance or reimbursement for tuition, and an additional $350 per month.

Program content, benefits, requirements and personnel are subject to change by the U.S. Department of the Army.

Major (None)

Minor (None)

Courses (MILS)

101 Foundations of Officership. (2)
The purpose of this course is to introduce cadets to issues and competencies that are central to a commissioned officer’s responsibilities. These initial lessons establish a framework for understanding officership, leadership, and Army values. Additionally, the course teaches “life skills” including fitness and time management. The course is designed to give you accurate insight into the Army profession and the officers’ role within the Army. A two hour leadership lab and two one-hour physical fitness sessions per week are required in addition to class. Fall.

102 Basic Leadership. (2)
This course is a continuation of 101 and is designed to introduce cadets to issues and competencies that are central to a commissioned officer’s responsibilities. These lessons reinforce self-confidence through participation in physically and mentally challenging exercises with upper division ROTC students. Students learn to relate organizational and ethical values to enable them to be better leaders and citizens. A two hour leadership lab and two one-hour physical fitness session per week are required in addition to class. Spring.
 
201 Individual Leadership Studies. (3)
The first, third and fourth years of the ROTC curriculum were designed to provide a consistent learning experience for the cadet. The purpose of year two is to work from the same or similar learning objectives developed as part of years one, three and four—but to provide direct experience. The subject is leadership. The curriculum necessarily involves understanding how to build teams, how to influence, how to communicate, how and when to make decisions, how to engage in creative problem-solving, and how to plan and organize. A two hour leadership lab and two one-hour physical fitness sessions per week are required in addition to class. Fall.

202 Leadership and Teamwork. (3)
This course is a continuation of 201 and involves using direct experience in understanding how to build teams, how to influence, how to communicate, how and when to make decisions, how to engage in creative problem-solving, and how to plan and organize. A two hour leadership lab and two one-hour physical fitness sessions per week are required in addition to class. Spring.

210 Military History I. (2)
Army ROTC's Military History course examines the evolution of American warfare from colonial times through the Civil War and World War I to increase cadets', students', and citizens' understanding of the art of war, political discourse, and the human condition. Participants analyze past events through reading and discussion to gain perspective on the present. The course will not force the memorization of hundreds of dates or allow passive attendance of a lecture; it will challenge students to develop critical thinking to better understand our complex world. Fall.

211 Military History II. (2)
Army ROTC's Military History course continues its examination of the evolution of American warfare from the origins of World War II to the recent past to increase cadets', students', and citizens' understanding of the art of war, political discourse, and the human condition using the same methods as MILS 210. Spring.

301 Leadership and Problem Solving. (4)
This course is designed to enable a student with no prior military or cadet experience to quickly learn essential cadet knowledge and skills necessary for integration into the cadet battalion and successful performance of key cadet tasks. Cadets are first introduced to principles of physical fitness and a healthy lifestyle. They are taught how to plan and conduct small unit training as well as basic tactical principles. A two hour leadership lab and two one-hour physical fitness sessions are required per week in addition to class. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all MILS 100 and 200 level courses or constructive credit. Fall.

302 Leadership and Ethics. (4)
This course is a continuation of 301 and is designed to enable a student with no prior military or cadet experience to quickly learn essential cadet knowledge and skills necessary for integration into the cadet battalion and successful performance of key cadet tasks. Cadets learn how to work as a team and are taught how to plan and conduct small unit training as well as basic tactical principles. A two hour leadership lab and two one-hour physical fitness sessions are required per week in addition to class. Prerequisite: 301. Spring.

341 Leadership and Management. (4)
This course is designed to enable cadets to make informed decisions about the career path they would like to take as they prepare to become lieutenants in the United States Army. The lessons focus on Army operations and training management, communication and leadership skills, and support the final transition from cadet to lieutenant. A two hour leadership lab and two one-hour physical fitness sessions are required per week in addition to class. Prerequisites: 301, 302. Fall.

342 Officership. (4)
Continues the methodology of 341. This course focuses on attaining knowledge and proficiency in several critical areas cadets will need to operate effectively as Army officers. These areas include: Army training management, coordinating activities with staffs, and counseling skills. A two hour leadership lab and two one-hour physical fitness sessions are required per week in addition to class. Prerequisites: 301, 302 , 341. Spring.