European Studies

Department Chair: Jason Schlude

The European Studies major offers students an interdisciplinary program of study in classical, medieval and Renaissance, or modern Europe. The major serves students whose interests in these areas extend beyond the scope of the standard curriculum of a single humanities department. Students in this major acquire a broad-based understanding of their chosen historical period by integrating course work from at least three different areas: history, philosophy, literature, theology, and the fine arts (art, music, or theater). The European Studies major builds on the skills of analysis, written and oral interpretation, and cultural awareness emphasized in the common curriculum. This major fosters a unified liberal arts curriculum, leading students to a better understanding of the complexities of the human condition. The major provides a strong basis for graduate work in the humanities and is a useful preparation for careers in public affairs, Foreign Service, international business, museum work, the media, and the arts.

A student who intends to major in European Studies should confer with the program director as early as possible to identify the most appropriate concentration and to choose a faculty advisor from a humanities department. Students are encouraged to look carefully at offerings in other areas, such as Study Abroad Programs, Gender Studies, and Honors for additional courses that may contribute to their major. All courses not on the approved European Studies list must be approved by the program director.

Assessment of Student Learning

Before students are accepted to the European Studies major, they will establish a plan for their major with their faculty advisor which must be approved by the program director. At the end of the major, students complete the Capstone.

Acceptance to Major Requirements

Course Requirements:  two courses supporting the major by the end of the spring semester of the student’s sophomore year, such as History 130: The Ancient World, History 220: Sword and Scroll, Humanities 221: The Golden Age of Athens, Humanities 327: Classical Mythology, History 330: Greece in the Classical Period, History 332: Roman Empire, or Greek or Latin courses at any level (111, 112, 211, or 300)
Minimum Grade and/or GPA for required courses:  2.0 GPA (Major and Department)
Minimum Cumulative GPA:  2.0

Time of application: Students apply to the Languages and Cultures Department Chair for admission to the Classical Studies major during the spring semester of their sophomore year and are accepted to the major before registering for junior-year coursework. Students, of course, may apply for admission to the major earlier as well. We encourage early consultation with Classics faculty, to consider on-campus offerings and study abroad options.

Unconditional acceptance: The student (1) has earned at least a C (2.00) grade point average for all coursework completed and for all coursework completed in the intended major and (2) is on track to complete two courses supporting the major by the end of the spring semester of the student’s sophomore year (see example courses above).

Conditional acceptance to major: The Languages and Cultures Department Chair may, at her/his discretion, admit students to the major who do not meet the criteria for unconditional acceptance. Such students may proceed with current registration, but their subsequent continuation in the major will be contingent on meeting expectations stipulated by the Chair.

Major The European Studies major offers concentrations in Classical Studies, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and Modern European Studies.

Basic Requirements (18 credits)

Required Courses:

(1) Four credits in History with focus on Europe in chosen area of concentration:

HIST 113A & B (History of Greece/Rome in the Classical World, abroad) (Classical Concentration)

HIST 130 (The Ancient World) (Classical Concentration)

HIST 220 (Sword and Scroll: Violence and Cultural Exchange in Antiquity) (Classical Concentration)

HIST 141 (Europe - Black Death to French Revolution) (Medieval & Modern European Concentrations)

HIST 142A (Europe since 1750: Old Regime to European Union) (Modern European Concentration)

(2) Four credits in Philosophy or Fine Arts with focus on Europe.

PHIL 121 (Great Issues)

PHIL 123 (Philosophy of Human Nature)

PHIL 125 (Social Philosophy)

PHIL 150 (Philosophy in Literature)

PHIL 153 (Philosophy & Gender)

ART 230 (Art Moves I: Art History, Neolithic-1400)

ART 221 (Art History of Greece, abroad) and ART 222 (Art History of Rome, abroad)

ART 223 (Art History of Britain, abroad)

ART 240G (Renaissance & Baroque Art, abroad)

ART 250 (History of Art in France, abroad)

(3) Four credits in literature with focus on Europe in English or Humanities (Check listings in Study Abroad Programs for other possible offerings):

ENGL 122 (Fiction & Poetry, when topic is relevant)

ENGL 221 (World Literature, when topic is relevant)

ENGL 221B (Medieval Literature: Homer to Dante)

ENGL 222 (Traditions in English, when topic is relevant)

HUMN 221 (The Golden Age of Athens)

HUMN 222 (Literature of the Western World: Medieval to Modern)

(4) Completion of one 4-credit language course 212 or higher in the relevant language.

(5) Completion of the 2-credit Capstone Project, involving at least two disciplines, to be completed in the senior year and presented in a public forum, such as Celebrating Scholarship & Creativity Day. An Honors thesis fulfilling these requirements counts as the European Studies capstone project.

Concentration Requirements:

  • Up to 8 credits may be taken from the two other concentration lists within European Studies.
  • Courses taken abroad and other suitable on-campus courses can be substituted with approval of the European Studies program director.

Classical Studies (28 additional credits)

Required Courses:

(The language component must be met by a 300-level course in Greek or Latin
4 credits in History at the 300 level:

HIST 330 (Greece in the Classical Period) or

HIST 332 (Roman Empire)

4 credits in Philosophy at the 300 level:

PHIL 331(Ancient Philosophy)

20 additional credits from the following courses, to be chosen in consultation with the faculty adviser and program director:

ART 221 (Art History of Greece) & ART 222 (Art History of Rome, abroad)

ART 230 (Art Moves I: Art History, Neolithic-1400)

ENGL 221B (Medieval Literature: Homer to Dante)

GREK 327 (Topics in Greek Literature)

GREK 332 (Topics in Greek Historians)

GREK 341 (Homer & Epic Poetry)

GREK 342 (Greek Tragedy)

GREK 345 (Studies in Plato)

GREK 347 (Aristophanes)

HIST 220 (Sword and Scroll: Violence and Cultural Exchange in Antiquity)

HIST 330 (Greece in the Classical Period)

HIST 332 (Roman Empire)

LATN 327 (Topics in Latin Lit)

LATN 331 (Vergil & Epic Poetry)

LATN 333 (Elegiac & Lyric Poetry)

LATN 338 (Roman Comedy)

LATN 342 (Cicero)

LATN 343 (Ovid's Metamorphoses)

LATN 349 (Roman Historians)

HUMN 221 (Golden Age of Athens)

HUMN 327 (Classical Mythology)

LNGS 331 & 332 (Greek & Roman Lit in Translation, abroad)

MUSC 335 (History of Music I)

THEA 337 (History of Theater to 1800)

THEA 367 (Topics in Theater History/Literature/Theory, when topic is relevant)

THEO 303 (Beginnings of Israel)

THEO 305 (Jesus & the Gospels)

THEO 306 (Paul & His Letters)

THEO 309A (Homer & the Hebrew Bible)

THEO 319 (Topics in Historical Theology, when topic is relevant)

THEO 337 (Judaism/Christianity/Islam)

THEO 391 & 392 (History of Eastern & Western Church, abroad)

Medieval/Renaissance Studies (28 additional credits)

Required Courses:

(The 4-credit language course may be in French, German, Greek, Latin, or Spanish.)

4 credits in History at the 300 level:

HIST 333 (Gender & Society in Western Europe)

HIST 336 (The Renaissance)

HIST 337 (The Age of Reformation)

4 credits in Philosophy at the 300 level:

PHIL 331 (Ancient Philosophy)

PHIL 333 (Medieval Philosophy)

20 additional courses from the following courses, to be chosen in consultation with the faculty adviser and program director:

ART 240G (Renaissance & Baroque Art, abroad)

ENGL 221x (Medieval Literature)

ENGL 222A (English Renaissance Lit)

ENGL 340A (Medieval Quests)

ENGL 352 (Shakespeare) 

ENGL 385J (Medieval Women)

FREN 330 (French Literature before the Revolution)

GERM 324 (German Culture before 1850)

GERM 330 (Medieval Maids, Myths, Miracles)

HISP 341 (Spanish Golden Age)

HIST 333 (Gender & Society in Western Europe)

HIST 336 (Renaissance)

HIST 337 (The Age of Reformation)

HUMN 300 (Topics in Humanities, when topic is relevant)

HUMN 300C Medieval Literature in Translation

MUSC 335 (History of Music I)

PHIL 331 (Ancient Philosophy)

PHIL 333 (Medieval Philosophy)

PHIL 346 (Philosophy of Religion)

THEA 337 (History of Theater to 18th C)

THEA 367 (Topics in Theater History/Literature/Theory, when topic is relevant)

THEO 319 (Topics in Historical Theology, when topic is relevant)

THEO 329B (Medieval Philosophy)

THEO 331 (Benedictine Spirituality)

Modern European Studies (28 additional credits)

Required Courses

(The 4-credit language course must be in French, German or Spanish.)

4 credits in History at the 300 level:

HIST 337 (The Age of Reformation)

HIST 344 (Modern Germany)

HIST 346 (Cold War Europe)

HIST 347 (Modern Britain)

HIST 348 (History of Ireland)

HIST 349 (Modern Russia)

4 credits in Philosophy at the 300 level:

PHIL 334 (Modern Philosophy)

PHIL 336 (19th C European Philosophers)

20 additional credits from among the following courses, to be chosen in consultation with the faculty adviser and program director:

ENGL 221 (Topics in World Literatures, when topic is relevant)

ENGL 222 (Topics: Literature in English, when topic is relevant)

ENGL 340 (Topics in Brit Lit, when topic is relevant)

ENGL 352 (Shakespeare)

ENGL 355 (Studies in Individual Authors, when topic is relevant)

ENGL 367 (Studies in Contemporary Literature, when topic is relevant)

ENGL 381 (Literature by Women, when topic is relevant)

ENGL 383 (Post-Colonial Literature)

ENGL 385 (Studies in Literature, when topic is relevant)

ENGL 385A (Anglo-Irish Literature)

FREN or LNGS 323 (French Civilization, abroad)

FREN 324 (French Cinema, abroad)

FREN 325 (French Lit, abroad)

FREN 331 (French Literature from Monarchy to Republic)

FREN 332 (20th-21st C French Literature)

FREN 341 (French-Speaking World Today)

FREN 351 (Topics in Literature, when topic is relevant)

FREN 352 (Topics in French Culture, when topic is relevant)

GERM 325 (German Culture 1850 to present)

GERM 333 (The Language of Love: German)

GERM 337 (Early 20th Century)

GERM 342 (Poetry in the German Tradition)

GERM 345 (Novels, Novellen, Stories and Tales)

GERM 349 (Genius!: The Romantic Invention of Creativity)

GERM 350 (Current Debates & Issues)

GERM 355, 356, 357 (Topics in Period, Genre, Theme, when topic is relevant)

GERM 357B (Seminar: The Holocaust, Its Origins & Effects)

GERM 378A (Migration and Culture: Contemporary Germany)

HISP 335 (Spanish Cultural Identity)

HISP 344 (Progress/Rev/Freedom in Spain)

HISP 349 (Contemporary Spain: Power & Social Change

HISP 359 (Spain & the European Union)

HIST 329 (Guns, Gold and Slaves: Africa and the British Empire)

HIST 333 (Gender & Society in Western Europe)

HIST 337 (The Age of Reformation)

HIST 344 (Modern Germany)

HIST 346 (Cold War Europe)

HIST 347 (Modern Britain)

HIST 349 (Modern Russia)

MUSC 336 (History of Music II)

PHIL 334 (Modern Philosophy)

PHIL 336 (19th C European Philosophers)

PHIL 341 (20th C Continental Philosophers)

PHIL 346 (Philosophy of Religion)

PHIL 355 (Philosophy of Violence/Nonviolence)

PHIL 356 (Aesthetics of Violence/Nonviolence)

THEA 338 (History of Theater 18th C to Present)

THEA 367 (Topics in Theater History/Literature/Theory, when topic is relevant)

THEA 368 (Modern Drama Seminar, when topic is relevant)

THEO 319 (Topics in Historical Theology, when topic is relevant)

Minor (None)

Courses (EURO)

Courses (HUMN)