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Summer 2015 Course Schedule

Summer Registration for new students |(Continuing students should register through Banner.)

Summer Courses 2015     Flip through our Summer Session course booklet

Course Descriptions (organized by alpha-order according to academic discipline.)  Classes are subject to change.  

For questions, contact:  [email protected]

DOCT 408 01A Ecclesiology (3) | Fr. Michael Byron

  • June 22-26, 2015 -- 8:00-11:30 AM AND July 27-31, 2015 -- 8:00-11:30 AM
  • Class meets M-T-W-TH-F both weeks
  • Students examine the nature and structure of the Roman Catholic Church, including its apostolic origins, the Church as commu¬nion and sacrament, magisterium and authority, local and universal Church, evangelization, ministry, and mission.

DOCT 424 01A - Theology of Sacraments and Worship (3) | Annie McGowan

  • June 15-July 2, 2014 -- 1:00-4:15 PM
  • Class meets M-T-TH-F in weeks 1 and 2, and M-T-W-TH in week 3
  • This course examines the roots of Christian worship in human myth, symbol, ritual, and celebration. Students will study the historical development of sacramental life in the Church and theological reflection upon it. Contemporary approaches to a theology of sacrament, especially in relation to Christology and ecclesiology, will be included. Cross-listed with LTGY 424 01A.

LTGY 424 01A - Theology of Sacraments and Worship(3) | Annie McGowan

  • June 15-July 2, 2014 -- 1:00-4:15 PM
  • Class meets M-T-TH-F in weeks 1 and 2, and M-T-W-TH in week 3
  • This course examines the roots of Christian worship in human myth, symbol, ritual, and celebration. Students will study the historical development of sacramental life in the Church and theological reflection upon it. Contemporary approaches to a theology of sacrament, especially in relation to Christology and ecclesiology, will be included. Cross-listed with DOCT 424 01A.

LTGY 468 01A - Liturgy and Aesthetics: The Ars Celebrandi (1) | Michael Driscoll

  • June 29-July 2, 2015 -- 8:00-11:15 AM
  • Class meets M-T-W-TH
  • Liturgy requires beauty in order to achieve meaning. Art and liturgy, when they join forces, express transcendence, and both art and liturgy are work that demands much care and attention. This course will look at the interplay of liturgy with the sacred arts (i.e. music, visual arts, architecture) and how they are united in the One who is the supreme beauty. Moreover, it will deal with the topic of liturgy as art.

LMUS 407 01A - Applied Organ (1) | Kim Kasling

  • June 15-July 24, 2015
  • TBA-individually scheduled
  • Students will develop technical skills and knowledge of performance practices at the graduate level, including the ability to play a large variety of repertoire fluently and with understanding. Major works of significant periods and schools of organ literature will be studied and performed. Secondary organ students will develop sufficient techniques and familiarity with the instrument to play knowledgeably and/or coach others in parish settings.

LMUS 408 01A - Applied Voice (1) | Carolyn Finley

  • June 15 - July 24, 2015
  • TBA-individually scheduled
  • This course covers the fundamentals of singing and vocal pedagogy (breathing, efficient use of voice, diction, etc.) and addresses differing musical styles and the need to interpret the music based on the performance practices of given periods in music history. Voice majors will study and perform significant bodies of solo repertoire. Majors and secondary voice students will emphasize technique and pedagogical skills appropriate to roles as choral directors, section leaders and coaches for cantors/song leaders in parishes.

LMUS 409 01A - Applied Composition (1) | Brian Campbell

  • June 15 - July 24, 2015
  • TBA-individually scheduled
  • Students receive individualized coaching in advanced composition of sacred music and music appropriate for liturgical performance. Work in various forms and styles is possible, depending on the needs and interests of individual students. Students should normally have a bachelor's degree in music or equivalent training and have significant experience in music composition. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and the liturgical music program director.

LMUS 421 01A - Psalmody and Hymnody  (3) | Don Saliers

  • July 6-24, 2014 -- 8:00-11:15 AM
  • Class meets M-T-TH-F each week
  • Students will examine the body of psalmody - text, music, poetic expression - as its forms have evolved from ancient Jew¬ish tradition, and study the forms, origins, numbering, translations and sources as they pertain to musical use. The course will include a survey of historical development of mainline Christian hymnody, authors, composers, styles, liturgical use. Current hymnals, styles of text, music and appropriateness for liturgical use will be scrutinized.

MONS 434 01A - Monastic Spiritual Theology (3) | Gregory Peters

  • July 7 - 25, 2014; 1:00-4:15 PM
  • Class meets M-T-TH-F each week
  • Monasticism is an ancient Christian institution and is historically present in all three of the major Christian traditions: Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Protestant. In this course, students will explore the Christian monastic tradition through reading and discussion of primary texts of these great monastic figures: John Cassian, Maximus the Confessor, Julian of Norwich, Martin Luther, Teresa of Avila, Seraphim of Sarov, Edward Pusey and Thomas Merton. Cross Listed with SPIR 434 01A.

MORL 468 01A - Ethical Lessons from the HIV/AIDS Pandemic: What Can Infectious Diseases Teach Us? (1) | Mary Ann Kish

  • July 20- 24, 2015 -- 8:00-11:15 AM
  • Class meets M-T-W-Th-F
  • Thirty years of the HIV/AIDS pandemic have seen rapid medical changes to which ethics struggles to keep apace. This course explores ethical issues raised by changes in medical treatment and prevention. It examines aspects of theological anthropology, sexuality, and social ethical questions. It provides a framework in which to approach ethical issues raised by other infectious diseases of worldwide import, such as tuberculosis and Ebola virus.

PTHM 405 01A - Introduction to Pastoral Ministry (3) | Dawn Carrillo

  • June 15-19, 2015 -- 8:00-11:30 AM  AND July 27-31, 2015 -- 1:00-4:15 PM
  • Class meets M-T-W-TH-F each week
  • This course introduces students to the theology of ministry, including historical and contemporary theologies of ordained and lay ministry. Students also explore basic methods in the practice of ministry.

PTHM 418 01A - Dynamics of Spiritual Direction (3) | Becky Van Ness

  • June 15 - July 2, 2015 -- 8:00-11:15 AM
  • Class meets M-T-TH-F in weeks 1 and 2, and M-T-W-TH in week 3
  • The study of spiritual direction allows student to develop skills in guiding others to identify and articulate their relationship with God through the life of faith, religious experience, discernment, and prayer. Students learn various models of spiritual direction and the purpose and dynamics of peer and individual supervision.

  • Prerequisites: 1)"The Practice of Discernment in Prayer" course; 2) Completion of an approved ministry core theology course; 3) Admission to the spiritual direction program

PTHM 459 01A-07A - Practicum (3) | Barbara Sutton

  • June dates and times TBA AND July 27-31, 2015 - 1:00-4:15 PM
  • Class meets M-T-W-TH-F in July
  • Students work with an organization, project, or parish in the area of their ministerial interest. The supervised experience requires the students to integrate theological competence with pastoral practice in developing vocational identity as a public minister, exploring issues of leadership, power and authority; and gaining facility in articulating the Christian faith and in fostering the development of faith with others. Students will reflect on the practice of ministry in theological reflection groups.

PTHM 468 01A - Integrating Spiritual Direction (3) | Eileen Flanagan

  • June 15-July 2, 2015 -- 1:00-4:15 PM
  • Class meets M-T-TH-F in weeks 1 and 2, and M-T-W-TH in week 3
  • Emphasis will be on integrating a theological understanding of spiritual direction with the experiences of practicum. This course will go more deeply into topics already introduced in the pre-practicum course, in addition to covering more advanced issues in spiritual direction. An exploration of Benedictine stability will support the on-going development of contemplative presence.  Grading is satisfactory / unsatisfactory.

    Prerequisites: 1) Completion of the "Practicum for Spiritual Direction" 2) recommendation of the director of the Certificate Program in Spiritual Direction.

SSNT 468 01A - The Spirituality of the New Testament (3) | Laszlo Simon, OSB

  • June 15-July 2, 2015 -- 1:00-4:15 PM
  • Class meets M-T-TH-F in weeks 1 and 2, and  M-T-W-TH in week 3
  • The documents of the New Testament cannot be correctly understood without an examination of the historical circumstances that shaped them. Each sector of research - textual criticism, literary analysis, redaction criticism etc. - has its own proper rules but no one of these specializations is an end in itself. The Catholic interpretation of the New Testament is a theological discipline. Its main task is to contribute to the authentic and vital transmission of God's Word to his people and to the spiritual task of deepening genuine Christian faith. Cross-listed with SPIR 468 02A.

SSOT 406 01A - Biblical History and Sites (3) | Michael Patella, OSB

  • May Study Abroad-Holy Land and Turkey
  • May 19 - June 10, 2015
  • This course forms the educational component for the study tour of the Holy Land and Turkey. It surveys the historical and archaeological sites which provide the context for both the Old and New Testaments. It includes visits to places held sacred by Christians as well as those revered by Jews and Muslims.

SSOT 468 02A - Who is the Old Testament God? (1) | Laszlo Simon, OSB

  • July 13-17, 2015; 8:00-11:15 AM
  • Class meets M-T-W-TH-F
  • No one can know what God is really like. The Bible does not speak of who God is but of what God says, how God acts and how God is experienced. The Old Testament is full of variety and of contradictions: in this we course we will explore briefly God's relationship to the world, to humans, and quite especially to Israel. We will uncover both the fragility and the resilience of these relationships. Cross-listed with SPIR 468 04A.

SPIR 434 01A - Monastic Spiritual Theology (3) | Gregory Peters

  • July 7 - 25, 2014; 1:00-4:15 PM
  • Class meets M-T-TH-F each week
  • Monasticism is an ancient Christian institution and is historically present in all three of the major Christian traditions: Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Protestant. In this course, students will explore the Christian monastic tradition through reading and discussion of primary texts of these great monastic figures: John Cassian, Maximus the Confessor, Julian of Norwich, Martin Luther, Teresa of Avila, Seraphim of Sarov, Edward Pusey and Thomas Merton. Cross Listed with MONS 434 01A.

SPIR 468 02A - The Spirituality of the New Testament (3) | Laszlo Simon, OSB

  • June 15-July 2, 2015 -- 1:00-4:15 PM
  • Class meets M-T-TH-F in weeks 1 and 2, and M-T-W-TH in week 3
  • The documents of the New Testament cannot be correctly understood without an examination of the historical circumstances that shaped them. Each sector of research - textual criticism, literary analysis, redaction criticism etc. - has its own proper rules but no one of these specializations is an end in itself. The Catholic interpretation of the New Testament is a theological discipline. Its main task is to contribute to the authentic and vital transmission of God's Word to his people and to the spiritual task of deepening genuine Christian faith. Cross-listed with SSNT 468 01A.

SPIR 468 04A - Who is the Old Testament God? (1) | Laszlo Simon, OSB

  • July 13-17, 2015 -- 8:00-11:15 AM
  • Class meets M-T-W-TH-F
  • No one can know what God is really like. The Bible does not speak of who God is but of what God says, how God acts and how God is experienced. The Old Testament is full of variety and of contradictions: in this we course we will explore briefly God's relationship to the world, to humans, and quite especially to Israel. We will uncover both the fragility and the resilience of these relationships. Cross-listed with SSOT 468 02A.

SPIR 468 05A - Praying with Imagination (3) | Barbara Sutton with Dawn Carrillo and Anne Kaese

  • July 12, 2015 --4:00 PM to July 17, 2015 -- 2:00 PM (retreat schedule)
  • Class begins with on-line components in early July and concludes with final on-line components following the retreat week; will meet S-M-T-W-TH-F July 12-17
  • This course invites pastoral leaders and catechists to pray with the Illuminated Word of The Saint John's Bible and to extend that prayer through the arts of bookmaking, such as calligraphy, painting, and storytelling. The morning sessions empower participants to practice the Seeing the Word process, delve deeper into learning the rhythm of visio divina and facilitate the practice with others. The afternoon sessions will invite participants to ground their own spirituality through developing their artistic imagination. Some evening hours will also be scheduled. Pre-reading and post-reflection/integration assignments for credit-earning students.

Summer Registration