Summer 2014 Course Schedule

Summer Registration for new students |(Continuing students should register through Banner.)

Course Descriptions (Classes are subject to change.)

DOCT 411 01A - Christian Anthropology (3) | Fr. Michael Byron

  • June 16 - July 1, 2014
  • 1:00 - 4:15 P.M.
  • This course is an investigation of the Christian doctrine of the human person: creation and fall, sin and grace, justification and sanctification, eschatological fulfillment.

DOCT 468 01A - Ecology and the Old Testament (3) | Samuel Thomas

  • July 7 - 25, 2014
  • 1:00 - 4:15 P.M.
  • What is the relationship between human beings and nature? This question is at least as old as the Epic of Gilgamesh, and it runs throughout the Old Testament in a fascinating variety of ways. In this course we will engage deeply with ancient texts and consider what an Old Testament theology of creation might mean for contemporary times. In our age of environmental crises, the Old Testament can provide a restorative vision of right and ordered relations between humans, nature, and God.
  • Cross-listed with SSOT 468 02A

HHTH 468 01A - Households of God: Monasticism in Ireland 1028-1541 (3) | Colman O'Clabaigh, OSB

  • July 7 - 25, 2014
  • 1:00 - 4:15 PM
  • A survey of the various ways in which medieval Irish men and women led the monastic life from the establishment of a community of Benedictine monks at Holy Trinity Cathedral in Dublin c. 1028 to the Henrician campaign to dissolve the monasteries in 1540-1541. WE will include a special examination of the economic, pastoral, political, architectural and artistic achievements of late-medieval Irish religious and details the manner in which they faced the challenges of the Tudor Reformation.

LTGY 400 01A - History and Sources of Liturgy (3) | Maxwell Johnson

  • July 7 - 25, 2014
  • 8:00 - 11:15 A.M.
  • This course is a survey of Christian liturgical history with regard to both Eastern and Western rites, from antiquity to the present. Students will examine fundamental liturgical sources. This course serves as a basic introduction to the methodology and auxiliary sciences of liturgy.

LTGY 468 01A - Mary and the Saints in Liturgy (3) | Maxwell Johnson

  • June 19 - July 3, 2014
  • 8:00 - 11:15 A.M.
  • This course explores the evolution and theology of Mary and the saints in their liturgical and doctrinal expressions in an attempt to discern, evaluate, and articulate their proper place within Christian liturgy, doctrine, and life today in relationship to the central mediatorial role of Christ. Issues of popular piety, "models of holiness," and ecumenical division, dialogue, convergence, the feminist critique, and liturgical renewal will also be examined.

LTGY 468 01A - Eucharist in the Non-Byzantine Christian East (1) | Rev. Daniel Findikyan

  • July 14 - 18, 2014
  • 1:00 - 4:15 P.M.
  • The one-credit course will survey the Eucharistic liturgies of the Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopian, East and West Syrian Rites. Our aim will be to uncover the distinctive Christian witness coded in each rite's liturgy by means of a careful reading of the texts and rituals against a survey of the history, development and unique features of each rite. The Spirituality of these churches emanates particularly from their liturgy.

LMUS 407 01A - Applied Organ (1) | Kim Kasling

  • June 16 - July 25, 2014
  • TBA-individually scheduled
  • Students will develop technical skills and knowledge of performance practices at the graduate level, including the ability to play a large variety of repertoire fluently and with understanding. Major works of significant periods and schools of organ literature will be studied and performed. Secondary organ students will develop sufficient techniques and familiarity with the instrument to play knowledgeably and/or coach others in parish settings.

LMUS 408 01A - Applied Voice (1) | Carolyn Finley

  • June 16 - July 25
  • TBA-individually scheduled
  • This course covers the fundamentals of singing and vocal pedagogy (breathing, efficient use of voice, diction, etc.) and addresses differing musical styles and the need to interpret the music based on the performance practices of given periods in music history. Voice majors will study and perform significant bodies of solo repertoire. Majors and secondary voice students will emphasize technique and pedagogical skills appropriate to roles as choral directors, section leaders and coaches for cantors/song leaders in parishes.

LMUS 409 01A - Applied Composition (1) | Brian Campbell

  • June 16 - July 25, 2014
  • TBA-individually scheduled
  • Students receive individualized coaching in advanced composition of sacred music and music appropriate for liturgical performance. Work in various forms and styles is possible, depending on the needs and interests of individual students. Students should normally have a bachelor's degree in music or equivalent training and have significant experience in music composition. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and the liturgical music program director.

MONS 468 02A - Households of God: Monasticism in Ireland 1028-1541 (3) | Colman O'Clabaigh, OSB

  • July 7 - 25, 2014
  • 1:00 - 4:15 P.M.
  • A survey of the various ways in which medieval Irish men and women led the monastic life from the establishment of a community of Benedictine monks at Holy Trinity Cathedral in Dublin c. 1028 to the Henrician campaign to dissolve the monasteries in 1540-1541. WE will include a special examination of the economic, pastoral, political, architectural and artistic achievements of late-medieval Irish religious and details the manner in which they faced the challenges of the Tudor Reformation.

MORL 421 01A - Fundamental Moral Theology (3) | Angela Senander

  • June 16 - 20, 2014 - 8:00 - 11:15 A.M.
  • July 28 - August 1, 2014 - 1:00 - 4:30 PM
  • This course covers the foundations of the Christian moral life and of Christian moral decision making. The fundamental themes to be covered include, but are not limited to: freedom; conscience formation and moral agency; moral normativity; what constitutes moral reasoning; the use of scripture, tradition, and natural law in moral decisions; the interplay between sin and grace; virtue ethics; and the ecclesial aspect of moral decisions.

PTHM 452 01A - Youth Ministry (3) | Jeff Kaster

  • June 23 - 27, 2014 - 8:00 - 11:15 A.M.
  • July 28 - August 1, 2014 - 8:00 - 12:00 noon
  • This course will explore the vision and practice of Catholic youth ministry within the framework of a theology of evangelization and catechesis. Emphasis will be placed on exploring contextual issues facing youth and families. Particular attention will be given to developing research methodology for assessing youth ministry programs with the purpose of program improvement.

PTHM 459 01A-07A - Practicum (3) | Barbara Sutton

  • June 23 - 27, 2014 - 8:00-11:15 A.M.
  • July 28 - August 1, 2014 - 8:00-12:00 noon
  • Students work with an organization, project, or parish in the area of their ministerial interest. The supervised experience requires the students to integrate theological competence with pastoral practice in developing vocational identity as a public minister, exploring issues of leadership, power and authority; and gaining facility in articulating the Christian faith and in fostering the development of faith with others. Students will reflect on the practice of ministry in theological reflection groups.

PTHM 468 01A - Religion in Higher Education: History, Analysis and Practice of Chaplains and Campus Ministers (3) | J. Cody Nielsen

  • June 16 - July 3, 2014
  • 1:00 - 4:15 P.M.
  • Drawing on historical roots, this class with explore the work of religion in higher education in discussion and practice. Models of Chaplaincy and Campus ministry will be explored alongside an in-depth analysis of what religious and spiritual identity brings to the academy. Participants should expect conversations on development theory as well as practical understanding of higher education.

PTHM 468 02A - Digital Storytelling and Communities of Faith: Resources and Strategies for Ministry in a Media Culture (1) | Mary Hess

  • June 23 - 27, 2014
  • 1:00 - 4:15 P.M.
  • This course will focus on finding constructive ways to engage digital stories -- both the commercialized ones presented by media culture, and the generative ones created within faith community. Using communicative theology as a base, we will explore how to use digital story creation for ministry, worship, and evangelization. Along the way we will explore several free, or low cost, digital media tools.

PTHM 468 03A - Exploring Forgiveness (1) | Joyce Zavarich

  • July 21 - 25, 2014
  • 8:00 - 11:15 A.M.
  • Perhaps the most difficult issue we face as individuals and as a world community is can we forgive after harm has been done. This course provides an opportunity to examine the concept and process of forgiveness through the lens of theology, philosophy, and social sciences. An understanding of the power of forgiveness and healing in terms of intrapersonal, interpersonal and societal/political conflict context will be explored.
  • Our discussions will focus on such foundational yet challenging questions as: What does it mean to forgive? Is the difference between forgiveness and reconciliation? Do we have an ethical/moral duty to forgive? What does the process of forgiveness look like? What are the interpersonal and global dimensions of forgiveness?

SSNT 468 01A - Catholic Letters, Epistle to the Hebrews and Revelation (3) | Laszlo Simon, OSB

  • July 7 - 25, 2014
  • 8:00 - 11:15 A.M.
  • This course will survey the historical context as well as the major theological and literary themes of the Catholic Letters, the Epistle to the Hebrews and Revelation. Special attention will be given to the dynamic history of interpretation associated with these New Testament writings.

SSOT 406 01A - Biblical History and Sites (3) | Michael Patella, OSB

  • May Study Abroad-Holy Land
  • May 20 - June 11, 2014
  • This course forms the educational component for the study tour of the Holy Land. It surveys the historical and archaeological sites which provide the context for both the Old and New Testaments. It includes visits to places held sacred by Christians as well as those revered by Jews and Muslims.

SSOT 416 01A - Psalms (3) | Laszlo Simon, OSB

  • June 16 - July 3, 2014
  • 1:00-4:15 P.M.
  • The Psalms have formed the backbone of Jewish and Christian prayer for three thousand years. In addition to the study of selected psalms, topics include: the formation of the Psalter, various translations, the spirituality of the psalms, and the use of psalms in Christian prayer, especially the Eucharist and the Liturgy of the Hours.

SSOT 468 01A - Ecology and the Old Testament (3) | Samuel Thomas

  • July 7 - 25, 2014
  • 1:00-4:15 P.M.
  • What is the relationship between human beings and nature? This question is at least as old as the Epic of Gilgamesh, and it runs throughout the Old Testament in a fascinating variety of ways. In this course we will engage deeply with ancient texts and consider what an Old Testament theology of creation might mean for contemporary times. In our age of environmental crises, the Old Testament can provide a restorative vision of right and ordered relations between humans, nature, and God.
  • Cross-listed with DOCT 468 01A

SPIR 468 01A - The Practice of Discernment for Prayer (1) | Becky Van Ness

  • June 23 - 27, 2014
  • 1:00-4:15 P.M.
  • Preparatory to listening to others' experiences of God, we will explore how our own image of God evolves as we discern God's ways of being present to us in prayer and in life.  The course will include an introduction to the practice of lectio divina applied to our lived experience.

SPIR 468 02A - Eucharist in the Non-Byzantine Christian East (1) | Rev. Daniel Findikyan

  • July 14 - 18, 2014
  • 1:00-4:15 P.M.
  • The one-credit course will survey the Eucharistic liturgies of the Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopian, East and West Syrian Rites. Our aim will be to uncover the distinctive Christian witness coded in each rite's liturgy by means of a careful reading of the texts and rituals against a survey of the history, development and unique features of each rite. The Spirituality of these churches emanates particularly from their liturgy.

SPIR 468 03A - Movies, Monks, and Heroes: Finding Meaning and Success through Authenticity (1) | August Turak

  • July 21 - 25, 2014
  • 1:00-4:15 P.M.
  • Is authenticity the new holiness? Authenticity holds the secret to success in our personal, professional, and spiritual lives. Even business experts now argue that economic success emerges from "authentic brands" and "authentic products" managed by "authentic leaders."  Yet what exactly is authenticity? How do we get it and how do we teach it? And what is the relationship between authenticity and spirituality? This course will use a blend of reading, movies, exercises, Joseph Campbell's Hero's Journey and especially the monastic tradition to answer these questions. As much a guided adventure as a traditional class, students will learn how to live a more meaningful, successful, and spiritually fulfilling life by becoming more authentic individuals.

THY 404 01A - Introduction to Christian Tradition II (3) | Kevin Mongrain

  • June 16 - 20, 2014 - 8:00-11:15 A.M.
  • July 28 - August 1, 2014 - 1:00-4:30 PM
  • This course is an introductory survey of theology, studying representative texts from the Enlightenment to the modern age (1650-present). Students will examine figures and issues selected from various historical periods.

Summer Registration