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Fall 2016 Course Schedule

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2016 FALL CAMPUS CLASSES

Introductory and Capstone

HCHR 402 01A  History of Christianity I (3)

  • Bill Cahoy
  • Monday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This course is an introductory survey of theology, studying representative texts from the pre-Christian era to the Reformation (100 B.C. to 1650). Figures and issues will be situated within the philosophical and theological currents of their time.

THY 465 01A ThM Research Seminar (3)

  • Charles Bobertz
  • Thursday 2:30-4:30 PM
  • The research seminar is designed to direct and guide students in advanced theological research in preparation for writing a thesis. Students may prepare the thesis proposal in the course, or if approved, can begin writing the thesis. Students will be engaged in dialogue and critique of each other's work in order to enhance understanding of theological research and writing. The proposal will contain: a persuasive and debatable thesis statement, a description of the project that maps the argument with a brief summary of the positions and the lines of argument to be developed; a tentative outline, a preliminary bibliography of primary and secondary sources from current scholarship as well as the history of research on the topic. The bibliography will also include sources in the ancient and/or modern language being utilized in the thesis.

THY 597 01A Comprehensive Exams Seminar (3)

  • Charles Bobertz
  • Thursay 2:30-4:30 PM
  • This seminar provides a context in which students will prepare for the Comprehensive Examinations which complete the MA Degree in Theology. To that end, students will revise and submit a graduate paper begun in a previous course, and they will develop a research paper on a thesis that compares and contrasts content and method from two different theological areas of concentration (e.g., scripture, systematics, church history, etc.). The research paper must have a bibliography of at least twenty items (books and/or journal articles). Students will be expected to have (1) completed and submitted an approved graduate paper and (2) completed an initial draft of this paper by the end of the seminar. A completed and approved graduate paper and research paper will constitute the written portion of the MA comprehensive examination.

THY 580 01A Thesis (6)

  • Dale Launderville, OSB
  • TBA

THY 598 01A Reading for Comprehensive Exams (1-6)

  • Dale Launderville, OSB
  • TBA

THY 599 01A Comprehensive Exams

  • Dale Launderville, OSB
  • TBA

Doctrine

DOCT 411 01A Christian Anthropology(3)

  • Kristin Colberg
  • Tuesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This course is an investigation of the Christian doctrine of the human person: creation and fall, sin and grace, justification and sanctification, eschatological fulfillment.

DOCT 468 01A Religious Pluralism:  Theology of Religions and Comparative Theology (3)

  • Chris Conway
  • Thursday 8:00-11:10 AM
  • Within Christian theology two modes of theological reflection have emerged in response to religious pluralism: Theology of Religions and Comparative Theology. This course will focus on both approaches and will explore the questions and methods central to their theological reflection. For Theology of Religions, this will include the questions of truth and salvation in other religions as understood through scriptural and doctrinal resources within the Christian tradition. For Comparative Theology, this will include the theological insights born from an engagement with the beliefs and practices of other religious traditions and theologies. 

History of Christianity

HCHR 468 01A/ SPIR 468 01A Spiritual Biography and Spiritual Journey (3)

  • Shawn Colberg
  • Tuesday 8:00-11:10 AM
  • This course will involve a careful, critical, and reflective reading of works that might be classified as "spiritual autobiography" in the Christian theological tradition. Examining these "self-presentations" as theological fonts, this course will introduce students to this genre and an understanding of each work in its historical and theological context. Particular attention will be given to the presentation of life as a "journey" with emphasis on those experiences which advance the person in his or her relationship with God. The roles of divine and human action located in experiences such as grace, sacramental action, self-examination, prayer, and good works will inform the way in which the course considers progress in the life stories. To that end, students will survey seminal texts in spiritual autobiography to consider and compare the way in which writers have come to express their movement into life or union with God.

Liturgical Music

LMUS 407 01A Applied Organ (1)

  • Kim Kasling
  • TBA
  • Students will develop technical skills and knowledge of performance practices at the graduate level, including the ability to play a large variety of repertoire fluently and with understanding. Major works of significant periods and schools of organ literature will be studied and performed. Secondary organ students will develop sufficient techniques and familiarity with the instrument to play knowledgeably and/or coach others in parish settings.

LMUS 408 01A Applied Voice (1)

  • Carolyn Finley
  • TBA
  • This course covers the fundamentals of singing and vocal pedagogy (breathing, efficient use of voice, diction, etc.) and addresses differing musical styles and the need to interpret the music based on the performance practices of given periods in music history. Voice majors will study and perform significant bodies of solo repertoire. Majors and secondary voice students will emphasize technique and pedagogical skills appropriate to roles as choral directors,

LMUS 408 02A Applied Voice (1)

  • Patricia Kent
  • TBA
  • This course covers the fundamentals of singing and vocal pedagogy (breathing, efficient use of voice, diction, etc.) and addresses differing musical styles and the need to interpret the music based on the performance practices of given periods in music history. Voice majors will study and perform significant bodies of solo repertoire. Majors and secondary voice students will emphasize technique and pedagogical skills appropriate to roles as choral directors,

LMUS 409 01 Applied Composition (1)

  • Brian Campbell
  • TBA
  • Individualized coaching in advanced composition of sacred music and music appropriate for liturgical performance. Work in various forms and styles is possible, depending on the needs and interests of individual students. Students should normally have a bachelor's degree in music or equivalent training and have significant experience in music composition. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and the liturgical music program director.

LMUS 433 01A Service Playing (1)

  • Kim Kasling
  • TBA
  • This course seeks to develop the qualified church organist as leader and enabler of the assembly's singing. The course will require high proficiency levels of assembly leadership and accompanimental skills (hymns, masses, psalm forms) as well as vocal and choral accompaniment. Students will also develop abilities in sight-reading, modulation, transposing, and extemporization.

LMUS 435 01A Service Leadership (1)

  • Patricia Kent
  • TBA
  • This course examines the historic role of the cantor in Jewish and Christian liturgy. Students will learn how to  teach antiphonal music to the assembly, appropriate directing skills, the cantor's ritual moments, and cantorial music resources. Students will study the role of congregational song leader as distinguished from that of cantor and choir director. Students will develop good song leading style, i.e., teaching new music to a congregation, learning appropriate directing techniques for congregational leadership. Developing vocal and musical styles for both ministries will be emphasized.

LMUS 439 01A Liturgical Music Practicum (1)

  • Kim Kasling/ Anthony Ruff, OSB
  • TBA
  • Students will be directly involved in actual liturgical music planning, rehearsing, and implementing in a variety of liturgical forms. This is to be done in area churches and/or on campus with permission of and under supervision of the adviser and other faculty with the aim of developing skills and the ability to integrate practice with musical and liturgical knowledge.

LMUS 468A 01A Final Project-Recital (1)

  • TBA
  • The final project is developed in consultation with a student's faculty adviser. The project might be a lecture-recital, a research paper and public defense, or a hymn festival.

LMUS 468 01A Gregorian Chant Schola (1)

  • Anthony Ruff, OSB
  • Tuesday 11:20 AM-12:20 PM/Thursday 11:20 AM -12:00 noon
  • Small ensemble which sings Gregorian chant according to informed scholarship and performs regularly at liturgies on campus. Commitment to sing at occasional week day and weekend liturgies outside of class meeting time required.

LMUS 501 01A  Liturgical Music Seminar (1)

Anthony Ruff, OSB

TBA

Students study the interpretation of music and liturgical theology, including the history of liturgical music; official documents; issues, problems, and positions in liturgical music practice; worship aid evaluation; presentation of music/liturgy plans. This course will be offered in 1 credit segments overthe next four terms.

Liturgy

LTGY 421 01A Word and Worship in the Liturgical Year (3)

  • Martin Connell
  • Tuesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This course reflects on the dynamics of time, story, and history in the liturgical shaping of time. Students will explore the theology of Sunday, and of festivals and seasons reflected in the evolution of the liturgical year and in the liturgical books and calendars of the churches today. Students will study the interplay of liturgical time and the rhythms of modern life.

LTGY 468 01A Sacraments as Passages of Commitment and Healing (3)

  • Johan Van Parys
  • Friday, 6:30-9:30 PM
  • Saturday 8:00 AM-3:00 PM
  • September 23-24; October 28-29; November 4-5; December 2-3

    As we journey from baptism to burial, Christ is made present in sacramental encounters that mark significant moments in our life. These ritual moments which make use of abundant Christian symbols mark our individual lives as well as life of the Church. In this course we will first look at liturgy, sacraments and symbols in general. Then, we will discuss the sacraments of vocation (marriage and holy orders) and well as the sacraments of healing (Reconciliations and Sacraments of the Sick).

Monastic Studies

MONS 468 01A Early Monastic Christian Lives in Context (3)

  • Makrina Finlay, OSB
  • Tuesday/Thursday 1:15-3:45 PM
  • August 29-October 27
  • This course considers the influences of Monastic Lives written between the 4th and 7th century, and places them in their literary, historical and theological contexts. It focusses especially on three Lives written by renowned church fathers: Athanasius' Life of St. Antony, Gregory of Nyssa's Life of St. Macrina and the Second book of Gregory the Great's Dialogues, considering ways in which the authors' wider theological positions are conveyed in the Lives as well as ways these monastic Lives shed light on how these theologians foresaw their positions being lived out in a concrete way.

Moral Theology

MORL 421 01A Fundamental Moral Theology (3)

  • Kathy Lilla Cox
  • Monday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This course covers the foundations of the Christian moral life and of Christian moral decision making. The fundamental themes to be covered include, but are not limited to: freedom; conscience formation and moral agency; moral normativity; what constitutes moral reasoning; the use of scripture, tradition, and natural law in moral decisions; the interplay between sin and grace; virtue ethics; and the ecclesial aspect of moral decisions.

Pastoral Theology

PTHM 422 01A Introduction to Ecclesial Law (3)

  • Amy Tadlock
  • Monday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • Students will study the theology, history, and general principles of Church law and build capacity to effectively analyze and solve canonical cases.

PTHM 412 01A Clinical Pastoral Education (4)

  • Barbara Sutton
  • TBA
  • Students participate in a basic unit of an accredited Clinical Pastoral Education program.

PTHM 459 01A- 09A Practicum/Theological Reflection (1-6)

  • Barbara Sutton
  • Friday 9:00 AM -12:00 noon
  • Students work with an organization, project, or parish in the area of their ministerial interest. The supervised experience requires students to integrate theological competence with pastoral practice in developing vocational identity as a public minister, exploring issues of leadership, power and authority; and gaining facility in articulating the Christian faith and in fostering the development of faith with others. Students will reflect on the practice of ministry in theological reflection groups.

Focus Areas:

  • 01A General Parish
  • 02A Religious Education
  • 03A Social Ministry
  • 04A Liturgy
  • 05A Homiletics
  • 06A Pastoral Care
  • 07A Campus Ministry and Young Adult Ministry
  • 08A Spiritual Direction (see special listing)
  • 09A Ministry on the Margins

PTHM 459 08A Spiritual Direction Practicum/Theological Reflection (1 or 2 credits)

  • Becky Van Ness
  • Monday 6:00-8:00 PM
  • August 29; September 28; October 31; November 28

PTHM 468 01A Community and Community Leadership (3)

  • Barbara Sutton
  • Wednesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • While some communities seem to form spontaneously, most require careful attention and consistent work in order to put down roots and thrive. This is the challenge of pastoral leadership. Outcomes for the course include identifying the principles that frame community as a theological, pastoral, and socio-cultural reality; learn and practice a model of gift discernment related to leaders and community members; create a framework for applying the functions of pastoral ministry to building and sustaining community life; articulate one’s personal vision of leadership for the sake of community; and exploration of the impact of culture, ethnicity, place, and mission on forming communities

Scripture

SSNT 422 01A Pauline Letters (3)

  • Michael Patella, OSB
  • Friday 6:30-9:30 PM
  • Saturday 8:00 AM-3:00 PM
  • September 9-10; September 30-October 1; October 21-22; November 11-12
  • A theological, historical and literary analysis of the Pauline letters, the topics studied may include the conversion and mission of Paul, the historical situation of the Pauline communities, the literary and rhetorical quality of the letters, and major theological themes.

SSOT 414 01A Wisdom Literature (3)

  • Dale Launderville , OSB
  • Wednesday 8:00-11:10 AM
  • This course focuses on Wisdom material of the Old Testament (especially Proverbs, Job, Qoheleth, Sirach, and Wisdom) and gives special attention to the exegesis of representative and difficult passages. The development of the Old Testament wisdom tradition in later writings including the New Testament, and the relevance of the wisdom tradition to the present is also addressed.

Spirituality

SPIR 437 01A The Practice of Discernment in Prayer (1)

NOTE:  Course Closed Fall 2016

  • Becky Van Ness
  • Wednesday 6:00-8:30 PM
  • September 21; October 12; October 26; November 16; November 30
  • An exploration of how our personal image of God evolves as we discern God's ways of being present to us in prayer and in life. By both studying and practicing discernment of spirits we can become sensitive to inner movements, understanding where they come from and where they lead us. The course includes an introduction to the practice of lectio divina applied to our lived experience.

SPIR 468 01A/HHTH 468 01A Spiritual Biography and Spiritual Journey (3)

  • Shawn Colberg
  • Tuesday 8:00-11:10 AM
  • This course will involve a careful, critical, and reflective reading of works that might be classified as "spiritual autobiography" in the Christian theological tradition. Examining these "self-presentations" as theological fonts, this course will introduce students to this genre and an understanding of each work in its historical and theological context. Particular attention will be given to the presentation of life as a "journey" with emphasis on those experiences which advance the person in his or her relationship with God. The roles of divine and human action located in experiences such as grace, sacramental action, self-examination, prayer, and good works will inform the way in which the course considers progress in the life stories. To that end, students will survey seminal texts in spiritual autobiography to consider and compare the way in which writers have come to express their movement into life or union with God.

Languages

LANG 401 01A Reading Latin I (3)

  • Jason Schlude
  • Monday/Wednesday/Friday 9:10-10:05 AM
  • An overview of the grammatical structure of the language and practice in reading. Ecclesiastical resources will be utilized for reading proficiency preparation. Graded A-F or pass/fail.

SSNT 401 01A New Testament Greek I (3)

  • Scott Richardson
  • Monday/Wednesday/Friday 9:10-10:05 AM
  • The instruction emphasizes reading comprehension of New Testament Greek with the aid of a dictionary. It includes the study of grammar with an eye toward its practical application. Biblical Resources will be utilized for reading proficiency preparation.
  • Graded A-F or pass/fail.

LANG 468 01A Advanced Greek (3)

  • Jason Schlude
  • Monday/Wednesday/Friday 12:40-1:35 PM
  • This course will offer students a review of key grammatical concepts in ancient Greek and an opportunity to build advanced reading skills through substantial exposure to Classical Greek authors such as Plato. Prerequisite is SSNT 402, GREK 112, or permission of the instructor. Graded A-F or pass/fail.

2016 FALL ONLINE CLASSES

SPIR 468 02A /PTHM 468 03A Contemporary Spiritual Practice (3)

  • Kathleen Cahalan
  • Why is spiritual practice on the rise? What do contemplation and social justice have to do with each other? Can people from different religions borrow practices from others? Students in this course will examine spiritual practices and ways of thinking about them that have become prominent in recent decades. These movements include the retrieval and redefinition of ancient practices (e.g., lectio divina, centering prayer, and the Jesus Prayer); the intersection of spiritual practice and social issues (e.g., the influence of other religions; the environment; and social justice); and contemporary theological emphases (e.g., work, the body, art, science, and gender). Students will explore recent scholarship on the rise of spiritual practice, the theological foundations as well as the actions and disciplines that comprise these approaches.

    PTHM 468 02A Ministry on the Margins (3)

  • Barbara Sutton
  • This course introduces the practices of discipleship for a church that cares for at-risk communities. The Joy of the Gospel (Pope Francis) will shape the essential lens to view, understand and ultimately respond to the context in which students serve. It will explore foundational values of justice and love necessary for missionary activity, provide tools to advocate for the 'least of these' and build communities of hope. Spiritual tools to sustain the person ministering at margin will be explored.
  • NOTE: Course begins October 6, 2016 -- January 19, 2017
  • NOTE: Registrants currently participating in a Faith-Based Volunteer Program must submit additional documents

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