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Fall 2015 Course Schedule

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CAMPUS CLASSES

DOCT 406 01A  Christology (3)

  • William Cahoy
  • Tuesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • Students explore understandings of the person, presence and mission of Christ in Scripture, in doctrine and dogma, and in contemporary theology.

DOCT 468 01A  The Theology of Vatican II (3)

  • Kristin Colberg
  • Weekends: Friday, 6:30-9:30 PM; Saturday, 8:00 AM-3:00 PM
  • September 11-12; October 9-10; November 6-7; December 4-5
  • The Second Vatican Council has impacted virtually every area of Catholic life and thought. The council invited and guided the church to know itself and its relation to the world more deeply, and the implications of this enhanced understanding continue to unfold today. This course approaches the Second Vatican Council as a historical, sociological, and theological event. It examines the development of Vatican II, its final documents and the council's interpretation. Emphasis will be given to seeing the council as a whole and the way that each particular document -- and all the documents together -- are an expression of the council's general aims and overarching goals. Additionally, students will be asked to think independently about the connections between particular documents and how the council's teachings inform contemporary issues.

HHTH 412 01A Reformation, Modernity, and the Global Church (3)

  • Shawn Colberg
  • Wednesday 8:00-11:10 AM
  • This course surveys church history from the age of Luther to the present, introducing students to the historical dynamics that transformed the united "Christendom" of the Middle Ages into a diverse and truly global twenty-first century church.

HHTH 468 01A/SPIR 468 02A/PTHM 468 01A Latino Religious Expressions: Foundations in History and Spirituality (3)

  • Rebecca Berru Davis
  • Thursday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • This course draws on history and cultural studies to examine the theological and spiritual faith practices of U.S. Latinos. It explores the confluence of indigenous, Iberian, and African traditions; expressions of popular religion and devotion; gender and generational issues; diversity within the Latino community; current debates related to immigration and Catholic social teaching; and present day pastoral interests and concerns within a Latino context. Through the use of text analysis, case studies, writing, and class discussion this course aims at developing deeper appreciation, practical knowledge and the intercultural competencies needed to better serve an increasingly diverse Church.

LMUS 407 01A Applied Organ (1)

  • Kim Kasling
  • TBA
  • Students will develop technical skills and knowledge of performance practices at the graduate level, including the ability to play a large variety of repertoire fluently and with understanding. Major works of significant periods and schools of organ literature will be studied and performed. Secondary organ students will develop sufficient techniques and familiarity with the instrument to play knowledgeably and/or coach others in parish settings.

LMUS 408 01A Applied Voice (1)

  • Carolyn Finley
  • TBA
  • This course covers the fundamentals of singing and vocal pedagogy (breathing, efficient use of voice, diction, etc.) and addresses differing musical styles and the need to interpret the music based on the performance practices of given periods in music history. Voice majors will study and perform significant bodies of solo repertoire. Majors and secondary voice students will emphasize technique and pedagogical skills appropriate to roles as choral directors,

LMUS 408 02A Applied Voice (1)

  • Patricia Kent
  • TBA
  • This course covers the fundamentals of singing and vocal pedagogy (breathing, efficient use of voice, diction, etc.) and addresses differing musical styles and the need to interpret the music based on the performance practices of given periods in music history. Voice majors will study and perform significant bodies of solo repertoire. Majors and secondary voice students will emphasize technique and pedagogical skills appropriate to roles as choral directors,

LMUS 409 01 Applied Composition (1)

  • Brian Campbell
  • TBA
  • Individualized coaching in advanced composition of sacred music and music appropriate for liturgical performance. Work in various forms and styles is possible, depending on the needs and interests of individual students. Students should normally have a bachelor's degree in music or equivalent training and have significant experience in music composition. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and the liturgical music program director.

LMUS 431 01A  Advanced Choral Conducting (3)

  • Axel Theimer
  • Monday/Wednesday 9:30-11:00 AM
  • Students will review basic conducting techniques and will apply advanced vocal and conducting techniques through studies of standard choral literature representing various styles and forms. Special attention will be given to application of vocal techniques in the choral setting, gestures, and their effects on singing. The course will include score preparation, analysis of major choral works, and special rehearsal techniques.

LMUS 433 01A Service Playing (1)

  • Kim Kasling
  • TBA
  • This course seeks to develop the qualified church organist as leader and enabler of the assembly's singing. The course will require high proficiency levels of assembly leadership and accompanimental skills (hymns, masses, psalm forms) as well as vocal and choral accompaniment. Students will also develop abilities in sight-reading, modulation, transposing, and extemporization.

LMUS 435 01A Service Leadership (1)

  • Patricia Kent
  • TBA
  • This course examines the historic role of the cantor in Jewish and Christian liturgy. Students will learn how to  teach antiphonal music to the assembly, appropriate directing skills, the cantor's ritual moments, and cantorial music resources. Students will study the role of congregational song leader as distinguished from that of cantor and choir director. Students will develop good song leading style, i.e., teaching new music to a congregation, learning appropriate directing techniques for congregational leadership. Developing vocal and musical styles for both ministries will be emphasized.

LMUS 439 01A Liturgical Music Practicum (1)

  • Kim Kasling/ Anthony Ruff, OSB
  • TBA
  • Students will be directly involved in actual liturgical music planning, rehearsing, and implementing in a variety of liturgical forms. This is to be done in area churches and/or on campus with permission of and under supervision of the adviser and other faculty with the aim of developing skills and the ability to integrate practice with musical and liturgical knowledge.

LMUS 468 01A Final Project-Recital (1)

  • TBA
  • The final project is developed in consultation with a student's faculty adviser. The project might be a lecture-recital, a research paper and public defense, or a hymn festival.

LMUS 468 01A Gregorian Chant Schola (1)

  • Anthony Ruff, OSB
  • Tuesday and Thursday 11:15 AM-12:30 PM
  • Small ensemble which sings Gregorian chant according to informed scholarship and performs regularly at liturgies on campus. Commitment to sing at occasional week day and weekend liturgies outside of class meeting time required.

LTGY 400 History and Sources of the Liturgy (3)

  • Martin Connell
  • Monday/Wednesday 1:15-2:45 PM
  • This course explores the historical development and theology in the East and West of the catechumenate and the rites of baptism, the Spirit-gift, and first Eucharist, including contemporary reforms in the churches, with special emphasis on the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults.

LTGY 407 01A Liturgical Celebration (3)

  • TBA
  • Monday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • Through a sustained reflection on the church's tradition of lex orandi, lex credendi, students will be introduced to the theory and practice of good liturgical celebration. Contemporary liturgical practice will be evaluated in its historical, cultural, and theological context. Students will learn how the historical development of Christian liturgy, its anthropological dimensions, and important church documents influence how we worship today.

LTGY 468 01A Modern Liturgical Movements (3)

  • Anthony Ruff, OSB
  • Thursday 8:00-11:10 AM
  • A study of the modern liturgical movement, with its roots in the 19th century (Solesmes, Oxford, Tractarians), the new impulse given in 1903 with Pope Pius X’s call for active participation in the liturgy, the breakthrough of the Second Vatican Council, the development of an ecumenical understanding of liturgical renewal, and the implementation of liturgical renewal in the various churches (especially Roman Catholic, Anglican, and Lutheran). Attention will be given to the more recent controversies caused by questioning of the movement’s goals at both grass roots and official levels.

MONS 468 01A/SPIR 468 01A Eastern Christianity (3)

  • Columba Stewart, OSB
  • Tuesday 8:00-11:10 AM
  • The traditions of eastern Christianity were formative of the western church, and have continued to develop their distinctive identities rooted in ancient Christian cultures. This course will consider the variety and history of eastern Christian traditions, and then examine distinctive characteristics of eastern Christian faith and practice, especially liturgical spirituality, the importance of image and sacred space, the use of the body in prayer, and an emphasis on monasticism as the fundamental form of spiritual life for both vowed monastics and lay people. Cross listed.

MONS 468 02A Monastic Spaces  (3)

  • Colman O'Clabaigh, OSB
  • Wednesday 6;00-9:15 PM
  • Throughout history, nuns and monks have interacted with their environments to create distinctive 'monastic spaces'. Using insights derived from archaeology, art history, gender studies, geography, history, landscape studies, philosophy, sociology and theology this course explores how notions of enclosure and mission, cloister and world, earthly and heavenly emerged in the Middle Ages and how they find expression in contemporary monasticism.

MORL 421 01A Fundamental Moral Theology (3)

  • Kathy Lilla Cox
  • Monday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This course covers the foundations of the Christian moral life and of Christian moral decision making. The fundamental themes to be covered include, but are not limited to: freedom; conscience formation and moral agency; moral normativity; what constitutes moral reasoning; the use of scripture, tradition, and natural law in moral decisions; the interplay between sin and grace; virtue ethics; and the ecclesial aspect of moral decisions.

PTHM 401 01A Evangelization and Catechesis (3)

  • Jeff Kaster
  • Weekends: Friday, 6:30-9:30 PM; Saturday, 8:00 AM-3:00 PM
  • September 11-12; October 2-3; October 30-31; December 11-12
  • This course examines contemporary theologies and principles of evangelization and catechesis, theories of human and faith development, and various models and methods of evangelization and catechesis. Particular attention will be given to advancing catechetical leadership skills in assessment and strategic planning for program improvement.

PTHM 405 01A Introduction to Pastoral Ministry (3)

  • Dawn Carrillo
  • Thursday 8:00-11:10 AM
  • This course introduces students to the theology of ministry, including historical and contemporary theologies of ordained and lay ministry. Students also explore basic methods in the practice of ministry.

PTHM 412 01A Clinical Pastoral Education (4)

  • Barbara Sutton
  • TBA
  • Students participate in a basic unit of an accredited Clinical Pastoral Education program.

PTHM 459 01A- 09A Practicum/Theological Reflection (1-6)

  • Barbara Sutton
  • Friday 9:00 AM -12:00 noon
  • Students work with an organization, project, or parish in the area of their ministerial interest. The supervised experience requires students to integrate theological competence with pastoral practice in developing vocational identity as a public minister, exploring issues of leadership, power and authority; and gaining facility in articulating the Christian faith and in fostering the development of faith with others. Students will reflect on the practice of ministry in theological reflection groups.
  • Focus Areas:
    • General Parish
    • 02A Religious Education
    • 03A Social Ministry
    • 04A Liturgy
    • 05A Homiletics
    • 06A Pastoral Care
    • 07A Campus Ministry and Young Adult Ministry
    • 08A Spiritual Direction (see special listing)
    • 09A Ministry on the Margins

PTHM 459 08A Spiritual Direction Practicum/Theological Reflection (1 or 2 credits)

  • Becky Van Ness
  • Monday 6:00-8:00 PM
  • August 31; September 28; October 24; November 30

PTHM 468 01A/SPIR 468 02A/HHTH 468 01A Latino Religious Expressions: Foundations in History and Spirituality (3)

  • Rebecca Berru Davis
  • Thursday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • This course draws on history and cultural studies to examine the theological and spiritual faith practices of U.S. Latinos. It explores the confluence of indigenous, Iberian, and African traditions; expressions of popular religion and devotion; gender and generational issues; diversity within the Latino community; current debates related to immigration and Catholic social teaching; and present day pastoral interests and concerns within a Latino context. Through the use of text analysis, case studies, writing, and class discussion this course aims at developing deeper appreciation, practical knowledge and the intercultural competencies needed to better serve an increasingly diverse Church.

PTHM  468 02A / SPIR 468 03A  Theology and Spirituality of Vocation (3)

  • Kathleen Cahalan
  • Tuesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This course examines theologies of vocation and practices of discernment from both Catholic and Protestant traditions. The course examines vocation in relationship to who I am, how I live (marriage, single or religious life), and what I do (work and service). Students will explore God’s callings across the lifespan, in relationship to work and profession, and in terms of gifts and social context.

 PTHM 468 05A  Community and Community Leadership (3)

  • Barbara Sutton
  • Tuesday  6:00-9:15 PM
  • While some communities seem to form spontaneously, most require careful attention and consistent work in order to put down roots and thrive.  This is the challenge of pastoral leadership.  Outcomes for the course include identifying the principles that frame community as a theological, pastoral, and socio-cultural reality; learn and practice a model of gift discernment related to leaders and community members; create a framework for applying the functions of pastoral ministry to building and sustaining community life; articulate one’s personal vision of leadership for the sake of community; and exploration of the impact of culture, ethnicity, place, and mission on forming communities.

SPIR 437 01A The Practice of Discernment in Prayer (1)

  • Becky Van Ness
  • Monday 6:00-8:30 PM
  • September 14; October 5, 19; November 2, 16
  • Preparatory to listening to others' experiences of God we will explore how our own image of God evolves as we discern God's ways of being present to us in prayer and in life.
    The course will include an introduction to the practice of lectio divina applied to our lived experience. Grading is S/U.

SPIR 468 01A/MONS 468 01A Eastern Christianity (3)

  • Columba Stewart, OSB
  • Tuesday 8:00-11:10 AM
  • The traditions of eastern Christianity were formative of the western church, and have continued to develop their distinctive identities rooted in ancient Christian cultures. This course will consider the variety and history of eastern Christian traditions, and then examine distinctive characteristics of eastern Christian faith and practice, especially liturgical spirituality, the importance of image and sacred space, the use of the body in prayer, and an emphasis on monasticism as the fundamental form of spiritual life for both vowed monastics and lay people. Cross listed.

SPIR 468 02A/HHTH 468 01A/PTHM 468 01A Latino Religious Expressions: Foundations in History and Spirituality (3)

  • Rebecca Berru Davis
  • Thursday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • This course draws on history and cultural studies to examine the theological and spiritual faith practices of U.S. Latinos. It explores the confluence of indigenous, Iberian, and African traditions; expressions of popular religion and devotion; gender and generational issues; diversity within the Latino community; current debates related to immigration and Catholic social teaching; and present day pastoral interests and concerns within a Latino context. Through the use of text analysis, case studies, writing, and class discussion this course aims at developing deeper appreciation, practical knowledge and the intercultural competencies needed to better serve an increasingly diverse Church.

SPIR 468 03A /PTHM 468 02A  Theology and Spirituality of Vocation (3)

  • Kathleen Cahalan
  • Tuesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This course examines theologies of vocation and practices of discernment from both Catholic and Protestant traditions. The course examines vocation in relationship to who I am, how I live (marriage, single or religious life), and what I do (work and service). Students will explore God’s callings across the lifespan, in relationship to work and profession, and in terms of gifts and social context.

SSNT 401 01A New Testament Greek I (3)

  • Jason Schlude
  • Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:20-11:15 AM
  • The instruction emphasizes reading comprehension of New Testament Greek with the aid of a dictionary. It includes the study of grammar with an eye toward its practical application.

SSNT 424 01A Johannine Tradition (3)

  • Michael Patella, OSB
  • Tuesday and Thursday 9:45-11:10 AM
  • The Gospels and Letters of John have been very influential in the shaping of Christian theology. A close reading of the texts will provide an examination of the Johannine corpus within its theological, social and historical context.

SSNT 468 01A Catholic Epistles, Hebrews, and the Book of Revelation (3)

  • Charles Bobertz
  • Thursday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This course will survey the historical context as well as the major theological and literary themes of the Catholic Letters, the Epistle to the Hebrews and Revelation. Special attention will be given to the dynamic history of interpretation associated with these New Testament writings.

SSOT 416 01A Psalms (3)

  • Dale launderville , OSB
  • Thursday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • The Psalms have formed the backbone of Jewish and Christian prayer for three thousand years. In addition to the study of selected psalms, topics include: the formation of the Psalter, various translations, the spirituality of the psalms, and the use of psalms in Christian prayer, especially the Eucharist and the Liturgy of the Hours.

THY 402 01A Introduction to Christian Tradition (3)

  • Dale Launderville, OSB
  • Monday and Wednesday 8:00-9:45 AM
  • This course is an introductory survey of theology, studying representative texts from the pre-Christian era to the Reformation (100 B.C. to 1650). Figures and issues will be situated within the philosophical and theological currents of their time.

THY 465 01A ThM Research Seminar (3)

  • Charles Bobertz
  • Tuesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • The research seminar is designed to direct and guide students in advanced theological research in preparation for writing a thesis. Students may prepare the thesis proposal in the course, or if approved, can begin writing the thesis. Students will be engaged in dialogue and critique of each other's work in order to enhance understanding of theological research and writing. The proposal will contain: a persuasive and debatable thesis statement, a description of the project that maps the argument with a brief summary of the positions and the lines of argument to be developed; a tentative outline, a preliminary bibliography of primary and secondary sources from current scholarship as well as the history of research on the topic. The bibliography will also include sources in the ancient and/or modern language being utilized in the thesis.

THY 597 01A Comprehensive Exams Seminar (3)

  • Shawn Colberg
  • Tuesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This seminar provides a context in which students will prepare for the Comprehensive Examinations which complete the MA Degree in Theology. To that end, students will revise and submit a graduate paper begun in a previous course, and they will develop a research paper on a thesis that compares and contrasts content and method from two different theological areas of concentration (e.g., scripture, systematics, church history, etc.). The research paper must have a bibliography of at least twenty items (books and/or journal articles). Students will be expected to have (1) completed and submitted an approved graduate paper and (2) completed an initial draft of this paper by the end of the seminar. A completed and approved graduate paper and research paper will constitute the written portion of the MA comprehensive examination.

THY 580 01A Thesis (6)

  • William Cahoy
  • TBA

THY 598 01A Reading for Comprehensive Exams (1-6)

  • William Cahoy
  • TBA

THY 599 01A Comprehensive Exams

  • William Cahoy
  • TBA

2015 FALL ONLINE CLASSES

THY 402 01A Introduction to Christian Tradition (3)

  • Dale Launderville, OSB
  • This course is an introductory survey of theology, studying representative texts from the pre-Christian era to the Reformation (100 B.C. to 1650). Figures and issues will be situated within the philosophical and theological currents of their time.

DOCT 406 01A Christology (3)

  • William Cahoy
  • Students explore understandings of the person, presence and mission of Christ in Scripture, in doctrine and dogma, and in contemporary theology.

PTHM 468 03A (3) Campus Ministry--At the Intersection of Church, University, and Culture (3)

  • Barbara Humphrey McCrabb and Donald R McCrabb
  • An exploration of the context, mission, people, and strategies of campus ministry in service to the evangelizing mission of the Church. What are the fundamental aspects, characteristics and dimensions of campus ministry? Students will consider how campus ministry now - and may in the future - contributes to the Church's evangelization of culture.

PTHM 468 04A Ministry on the Margins (3)

  • Barbara Sutton
  • This course introduces the practices of discipleship for a church that cares for at-risk communities. The Joy of the Gospel (Pope Francis) will shape the essential lens to view, understand and ultimately respond to the context in which students serve. It will explore foundational values of justice and love necessary for missionary activity, provide tools to advocate for the 'least of these' and build communities of hope. Spiritual tools to sustain the person ministering at margin will be explored.
  • NOTE:  Course begins October 12, 2015-January 25, 2016
  • NOTE: Registrants currently participating in a Faith-Based Volunteer Program must submit additional documents

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