Fall 2014 Course Schedule

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DOCT 406 01A  Christology (3)

  • William Cahoy
  • Tuesday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • Students explore understandings of the person, presence and mission of Christ in Scripture, in doctrine and dogma, and in contemporary theology.

DOCT 468 01A/ HHTH 468 01A Christianity in Latin America and Among US Latinos (3)

  • Rebecca Davis
  • Wednesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • Taking a historical and cultural studies approach with attention to theology, this course examines the impact, conflicts, and transformation Christianity made and continues to make in Latin America and among U.S. Latinos. It explores the confluence of indigenous, Iberian, and African traditions, expressions of popular religion and devotion, the rise of Protestant evangelicalism, current debates related to immigration and Catholic social teaching, and present day Roman Catholic ministerial interests within a Latino context. In addition to the use of primary and secondary source readings, visual imagery will be used to explore these perspectives and themes. Cross listed with HHTH 468.

HHTH 468 01A / DOCT 468 01A Christianity in Latin America and Among US Latinos (3)

  • Rebecca Davis
  • Wednesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • Taking a historical and cultural studies approach with attention to theology, this course examines the impact, conflicts, and transformation Christianity made and continues to make in Latin America and among U.S. Latinos. It explores the confluence of indigenous, Iberian, and African traditions, expressions of popular religion and devotion, the rise of Protestant evangelicalism, current debates related to immigration and Catholic social teaching, and present day Roman Catholic ministerial interests within a Latino context. In addition to the use of primary and secondary source readings, visual imagery will be used to explore these perspectives and themes. Cross listed with DOCT 468.

LMUS 407 01A Applied Organ (1)

  • Kim Kasling
  • TBA
  • Students will develop technical skills and knowledge of performance practices at the graduate level, including the ability to play a large variety of repertoire fluently and with understanding. Major works of significant periods and schools of organ literature will be studied and performed. Secondary organ students will develop sufficient techniques and familiarity with the instrument to play knowledgeably and/or coach others in parish settings.

LMUS 408 01A Applied Voice (1)

  • Carolyn Finley
  • TBA
  • This course covers the fundamentals of singing and vocal pedagogy (breathing, efficient use of voice, diction, etc.) and addresses differing musical styles and the need to interpret the music based on the performance practices of given periods in music history. Voice majors will study and perform significant bodies of solo repertoire. Majors and secondary voice students will emphasize technique and pedagogical skills appropriate to roles as choral directors,

LMUS 408 02A Applied Voice (1)

  • Patricia Kent
  • TBA
  • This course covers the fundamentals of singing and vocal pedagogy (breathing, efficient use of voice, diction, etc.) and addresses differing musical styles and the need to interpret the music based on the performance practices of given periods in music history. Voice majors will study and perform significant bodies of solo repertoire. Majors and secondary voice students will emphasize technique and pedagogical skills appropriate to roles as choral directors,

LMUS 409 01 Applied Composition (1)

  • Brian Campbell
  • TBA
  • Individualized coaching in advanced composition of sacred music and music appropriate for liturgical performance. Work in various forms and styles is possible, depending on the needs and interests of individual students. Students should normally have a bachelor's degree in music or equivalent training and have significant experience in music composition. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and the liturgical music program director.

LMUS 433 01A  Service Playing (1)

  • Kim Kasling
  • TBA
  • This course seeks to develop the qualified church organist as leader and enabler of the assembly's singing. The course will require high proficiency levels of assembly leadership and accompanimental skills (hymns, masses, psalm forms) as well as vocal and choral accompaniment. Students will also develop abilities in sight-reading, modulation, transposing, and extemporization.

LMUS 435 01A Service Leadership (1)

  • Patricia Kent
  • TBA
  • This course examines the historic role of the cantor in Jewish and Christian liturgy. Students will learn how to  teach antiphonal music to the assembly, appropriate directing skills, the cantor's ritual moments, and cantorial music resources. Students will study the role of congregational song leader as distinguished from that of cantor and choir director. Students will develop good song leading style, i.e., teaching new music to a congregation, learning appropriate directing techniques for congregational leadership. Developing vocal and musical styles for both ministries will be emphasized.

LMUS 439 01A  Liturgical Music Practicum (1)

  • Kim Kasling
  • TBA
  • Students will be directly involved in actual liturgical music planning, rehearsing, and implementing in a variety of liturgical forms. This is to be done in area churches and/or on campus with permission of and under supervision of the adviser and other faculty with the aim of developing skills and the ability to integrate practice with musical and liturgical knowledge.

LMUS 468 01A  Final Project-Recital (1)

  • TBA
  • The final project is developed in consultation with a student's faculty adviser. The project might be a lecture-recital, a research paper and public defense, or a hymn festival.

LMUS 501 01A Liturgical Music Seminar (3)

  • Davd Jenkins
  • Thursday   3:30-7:00 PM
  • Students study the interpretation of music and liturgical theology, including the history of liturgical music; official documents; issues, problems, and positions in liturgical music practice; worship aid evaluation; presentation of music/liturgy plans.

LTGY 404 01A Rites of Initiation (3)

  • Martin Connell
  • Tuesday/Thursday 1:30-3:00 PM
  • This course explores the historical development and theology in the East and West of the catechumenate and the rites of baptism, the Spirit-gift, and first Eucharist, including contemporary reforms in the churches, with special emphasis on the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults.

LTGY 406 01A Eucharistic Theology (3)

  • Annie McGowan
  • Wednesday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • This course examines the origins of the Eucharistic liturgy and its historical development in both the East and West. Discussion will include doctrinal perspectives, an evaluation of contemporary reformed rites, particularly the new Roman Missal, and current ecumenical dialogue and pastoral practice.

LTGY 407 01A Liturgical Celebration (3)

  • Annie McGowan
  • Tuesday/Thursday    9:45-11:10 AM
  • Through a sustained reflection on the church's tradition of lex orandi, lex credendi, students will be introduced to the theory and practice of good liturgical celebration. Contemporary liturgical practice will be evaluated in its historical, cultural, and theological context. Students will learn how the historical development of Christian liturgy, its anthropological dimensions, and important church documents influence how we worship today.

MONS 435 01A / SPIR 435 01A  Christian Asceticism (3)

  • Columba Stewart, OSB
  • Tuesday 8:00-11:10 AM
  • Christian asceticism is centered upon a discernment of motivations, influences, and goals conducted within a relationship of spiritual accompaniment by an experienced guide. The psychological and spiritual insights of many early Christian writers, especially monastic ones, are a valuable but rarely used resource for spiritual directors, pastors, counselors, and persons seeking spiritual guidance. This course will be a study of classical, early Christian, and relevant later texts which bear on issues of spiritual growth and pastoral guidance. Cross-listed with SPIR 435.

MORL 421 01A Fundamental Moral Theology (3)

  • Kathy Lilla Cox
  • Monday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This course covers the foundations of the Christian moral life and of Christian moral decision making. The fundamental themes to be covered include, but are not limited to: freedom; conscience formation and moral agency; moral normativity; what constitutes moral reasoning; the use of scripture, tradition, and natural law in moral decisions; the interplay between sin and grace; virtue ethics; and the ecclesial aspect of moral decisions.

PTHM 405 01A  Introduction to Pastoral Ministry (3)

  • Virginia Stillwell
  • Thursday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • This course introduces students to the theology of ministry, including historical and contemporary theologies of ordained and lay ministry. Students also explore basic methods in the practice of ministry.

PTHM 412 01A  Clinical Pastoral Education (4)

  • Barbara Sutton
  • TBA
  • Students participate in a basic unit of an accredited Clinical Pastoral Education program.

PTHM 458 01A Social Ministry  (3)

  • Gary Reierson
  • Monday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • The course examines social outreach programs, which include direct service ministries such as homeless shelters, prison ministry, food pantries, as well as initiatives that address systemic social, political, and economic change. Students explore how the Catholic social teaching traditions inform a broad range of ministries at the parish, diocesan, and national levels.

PTHM 465 01A Integration Seminar (3)

  • Kathleen Cahalan
  • Thursday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This course represents the culmination of the student's preparation for ministry. Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze and construct a response to pastoral situations utilizing biblical, theological, historical, and social scientific resources. Students will develop goals for ongoing theological education and spiritual formation.

PTHM 459 01A- 08A Practicum/Theological Reflection (1-6)

  • Barbara Sutton
  • Friday 9:00 AM -12:00 noon
  • Students work with an organization, project, or parish in the area of their ministerial interest. The supervised experience requires students to integrate theological competence with pastoral practice in developing vocational identity as a public minister, exploring issues of leadership, power and authority; and gaining facility in articulating the Christian faith and in fostering the development of faith with others. Students will reflect on the practice of ministry in theological reflection groups.

SPIR 435 01A/MONS 435 01A Christian Asceticism (3)

  • Columba Stewart, OSB
  • Tuesday 8:00-11:10 AM
  • Christian asceticism is centered upon a discernment of motivations, influences, and goals conducted within a relationship of spiritual accompaniment by an experienced guide. The psychological and spiritual insights of many early Christian writers, especially monastic ones, are a valuable but rarely used resource for spiritual directors, pastors, counselors, and persons seeking spiritual guidance. This course will be a study of classical, early Christian, and relevant later texts which bear on issues of spiritual growth and pastoral guidance. Cross-listed with MONS 435.

SPIR 468 01A The Practice of Discernment in Prayer (1)

  • Becky Van Ness
  • Monday 6:00-8:00 PM | September 8, 22; October 6, 27; November 10; December 1
  • Preparatory to listening to others' experiences of God we will explore how our own image of God evolves as we discern God's ways of being present to us in prayer and in life. The course will include an introduction to the practice of lectio divina applied to our lived experience. Prerequisites: None.***Grading is satisfactory / unsatisfactory.***

SSNT 401 01A New Testament Greek I (3)

  • J. Schulde
  • M/W/F 3:00-3:35 PM - T/TH 2:20-3:40 PM
  • The instruction emphasizes reading comprehension of New Testament Greek with the aid of a dictionary. It includes the study of grammar with an eye toward its practical application.

SSNT 420 01A Gospels (3)

  • Michael Patella, OSB
  • WEB course--Religious Communities Cohort course
  • NOTE: September 12-14, 2014: On-site class meeting at New Melleray Abbey, Peosta Iowa
  • This study investigates the interrelated histories and theologies of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke within an analysis of the Synoptic problem.

SSNT 422 01A Pauline Letters (3)

  • Charles Bobertz
  • Thursday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • A theological, historical and literary analysis of the Pauline letters, the topics studied may include the conversion and mission of Paul, the historical situation of the Pauline communities, the literary and rhetorical quality of the letters, and major theological themes.

SSOT 400 01A Reading the Old Testament (3)

  • Corrine Carvahlo
  • Weekends: Sept. 12-13; Oct. 3-4; Oct. 24-25; Nov. 14-15
  • Friday 6:30-9:30 PM; Saturdays 8:00 AM-3:00 PM
  • The Israelites forged their identity as a people and sustained their common bonds through interaction and communication with YHWH. This course will examine the testimony of the Old Testament to this relational dynamic between YHWH, the people, and their leaders through the exegesis of representative texts from the Pentateuch, the Prophets, and the Writings.

SSOT 410 01A Pentateuch (3)

  • Irene Nowell, OSB
  • WEB Class--No Campus
  • The course introduces the student to the content, the traditions of interpretation, and the exegetical methods employed in the study of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy. The themes of creating, liberating, and covenanting are emphasized

THY 402 01A Introduction to Christian Tradition (3)

  • Shawn Colberg
  • Monday/Wednesday 9:45-11:10 AM
  • This course is an introductory survey of theology, studying representative texts from the pre-Christian era to the Reformation (100 B.C. to 1650). Figures and issues will be situated within the philosophical and theological currents of their time.

THY 465 01A ThM Research Seminar (3)

  • Charles Bobertz
  • Tuesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • The research seminar is designed to direct and guide students in advanced theological research in preparation for writing a thesis. Students may prepare the thesis proposal in the course, or if approved, can begin writing the thesis. Students will be engaged in dialogue and critique of each other's work in order to enhance understanding of theological research and writing. The proposal will contain: a persuasive and debatable thesis statement, a description of the project that maps the argument with a brief summary of the positions and the lines of argument to be developed; a tentative outline, a preliminary bibliography of primary and secondary sources from current scholarship as well as the history of research on the topic. The bibliography will also include sources in the ancient and/or modern language being utilized in the thesis.

THY XXX 01A Comprehensive Exams Seminar (3)

  • Shawn Colberg
  • Tuesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This seminar provides a context in which students will prepare for the Comprehensive Examinations which complete the MA Degree in Theology.  To that end, students will revise and submit a graduate paper begun in a previous course, and they will develop a research paper on a thesis that compares and contrasts content and method from two different theological areas of concentration (e.g., scripture, systematics, church history, etc.).  The research paper must have a bibliography of at least twenty items (books and/or journal articles).  Students will be expected to have (1) completed and submitted an approved graduate paper and (2) completed an initial draft of this paper by the end of the seminar.  A completed and approved graduate paper and research paper will constitute the written portion of the MA comprehensive examination.

THY 580 01A Thesis (6)

  • William Cahoy
  • TBA

THY 598 01A Reading for Comprehensive Exams (6)

  • William Cahoy
  • TBA

THY 599 01A/ THY 599 02A Comprehensive Exams

  • William Cahoy
  • TBA

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