Please update your web browser or disable Compatibility View.

Spring 2017 Course Schedule

Existing Students Registration (Banner) | New Students Registration

2017 SPRING CAMPUS CLASSES

Doctrine

DOCT 407 Trinity,Faith, Revelation (3)

  • Shawn Colberg
  • Thursday   8:00-11:10 AM
  • This course is an investigation of the historical development and the systematic import of the doctrine of the Trinity. Faith and revelation examined from the viewpoint of the Christian confession of God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

DOCT 408  Ecclesiology  (3)

  • Kristin Colberg
  • Wednesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • Students examine the nature and structure of the Roman Catholic Church, including its apostolic origins, the Church as commu¬nion and sacrament, magisterium and authority, local and universal Church, evangelization, ministry, and mission

History of Christianity

HHTH 400 Patristics (3)

  • Charles Bobertz
  • Wednesday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • This course surveys church history from the apostolic age to the Council of Chalcedon in 451, with special emphasis on the Apostolic Fathers, the Christianization of the Roman Empire, and the formation of Christian doctrine.

HCHR 404 01A History of Christianity II  (3)

  • Bill Cahoy
  • Monday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This course will examine the development of the Christian tradition, including the expression of seminal doctrines within the Christian church, from the 11th century to the present day. The course will explore the main trends in the development of the institution and primary doctrines of the church within the larger philosophical, social, and political contexts of the second millennium, paying attention to the ways in which the lived experience of Christian peoples informs and shapes its thinking.

Liturgical Music

LMUS 407 01A Applied Organ (1)

  • Kim Kasling
  • TBA
  • Students will develop technical skills and knowledge of performance practices at the graduate level, including the ability to play a large variety of repertoire fluently and with understanding. Major works of significant periods and schools of organ literature will be studied and performed. Secondary organ students will develop sufficient techniques and familiarity with the instrument to play knowledgeably and/or coach others in parish settings.

LMUS 408 01A Applied Voice (1)

  • Carolyn Finley
  • TBA
  • This course covers the fundamentals of singing and vocal pedagogy (breathing, efficient use of voice, diction, etc.) and addresses differing musical styles and the need to interpret the music based on the performance practices of given periods in music history. Voice majors will study and perform significant bodies of solo repertoire. Majors and secondary voice students will emphasize technique and pedagogical skills appropriate to roles as choral directors,

LMUS 408 02A Applied Voice (1)

  • Patricia Kent
  • TBA
  • This course covers the fundamentals of singing and vocal pedagogy (breathing, efficient use of voice, diction, etc.) and addresses differing musical styles and the need to interpret the music based on the performance practices of given periods in music history. Voice majors will study and perform significant bodies of solo repertoire. Majors and secondary voice students will emphasize technique and pedagogical skills appropriate to roles as choral directors,

LMUS 409 01 Applied Composition (1)

  • Brian Campbell
  • TBA
  • Individualized coaching in advanced composition of sacred music and music appropriate for liturgical performance. Work in various forms and styles is possible, depending on the needs and interests of individual students. Students should normally have a bachelor's degree in music or equivalent training and have significant experience in music composition. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and the liturgical music program director.

LMUS 433 01A Service Playing (1)

  • Kim Kasling
  • TBA
  • This course seeks to develop the qualified church organist as leader and enabler of the assembly's singing. The course will require high proficiency levels of assembly leadership and accompanimental skills (hymns, masses, psalm forms) as well as vocal and choral accompaniment. Students will also develop abilities in sight-reading, modulation, transposing, and extemporization.

LMUS 435 01A Service Leadership (1)

  • Patricia Kent
  • TBA
  • This course examines the historic role of the cantor in Jewish and Christian liturgy. Students will learn how to  teach antiphonal music to the assembly, appropriate directing skills, the cantor's ritual moments, and cantorial music resources. Students will study the role of congregational song leader as distinguished from that of cantor and choir director. Students will develop good song leading style, i.e., teaching new music to a congregation, learning appropriate directing techniques for congregational leadership. Developing vocal and musical styles for both ministries will be emphasized.

LMUS 439 01A Liturgical Music Practicum (1)

  • Kim Kasling/ Anthony Ruff, OSB
  • TBA
  • Students will be directly involved in actual liturgical music planning, rehearsing, and implementing in a variety of liturgical forms. This is to be done in area churches and/or on campus with permission of and under supervision of the adviser and other faculty with the aim of developing skills and the ability to integrate practice with musical and liturgical knowledge.

LMUS 468A 01A Final Project-Recital (1)

  • TBA
  • The final project is developed in consultation with a student's faculty adviser. The project might be a lecture-recital, a research paper and public defense, or a hymn festival.

LMUS 468 01A Gregorian Chant Schola (1)

  • Anthony Ruff, OSB
  • Monday 10:20-11:20 AM
  • Small ensemble which sings Gregorian chant according to informed scholarship and performs regularly at liturgies on campus. Commitment to sing at occasional week day and weekend liturgies outside of class meeting time required.

LMUS 468 02A Liturgical Music Seminar (1)

  • Anthony Ruff, OSB
  • Thursday 10:00-11:15 AM
  • Students study the interpretation of music and liturgical theology, including the history of liturgical music; official documents; issues, problems, and positions in liturgical music practice; worship aid evaluation; presentation of music/liturgy plans. This course will be offered in 1 credit segments over the next four terms.

Liturgy

LTGY 426 Liturgical Presiding (3)

  • Matthew Luft, OSB
  • Thursday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • Training in all aspects of liturgical presiding for those will lead worship as priests and deacons, including the study of rubrics and directives in the relevant official documents. Use of gesture and voice to relate well to the assembly and to other liturgical ministers. Training in singing the ministerial chants in the liturgical books. For future priests, focus on celebrating Mass. For future deacons, focus on their role at Mass, as well as presiding at Sunday Celebrations in the Absence of a Priest and other rites such as baptism and marriage. For non-ordination candidates, Sunday Celebrations in Absence of a Priest, and other rites such as funeral vigils.

LTGY 468 02A Initiation and Eucharist (3)

  • Anthony Ruff, OSB
  • Friday 6:30-9:00 PM; Saturday 9:00-11:00 AM, 1:00-2:30 PM
  • January 20-21, February 17-18, March 24-25, April 28-29
  • The origins of rites of initiation and eucharist, East and West, and their historical development. Theological and doctrinal perspectives. Examination of the postconciliar Roman rite and its attendant documents, with some treatment of other Christian traditions. Issues in contemporary pastoral practice.

Monastic Studies

MONS 410 Rule of Benedict (3)

  • Carmel Posa, SGS
  • Wednesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • The Rule of Benedict has been foundational to Benedictine, Cistercian, Camaldolese, and Carthusian monastic ways of life. This course will address the Rule in the context of its biblical and early Church sources, exegesis of the text, and issues of interpretation.

Moral Theology

MORL 422 01A - Christian Social Ethics (3)

  • Nickolas Becker, OSB
  • Thursday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • Students explore the implications of Christian faith and theological reflection for contemporary society, including the social dimensions of biblical ethics and the social teachings of the Catholic Church.

MORL 428 01A Survey of Moral Topics:  Health Care Ethics (3)

  • Kathy Lilla Cox
  • Tuesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This course examines how the application of fundamental moral themes informs particular issues of Christian morality; this course will examine how the application of fundamental moral themes informs Christian health-care ethics (Bioethics). Using themes such as human dignity, theological anthropology, suffering, and virtue, this course will explore the ethics of various topics within the areas of end-of-life, beginning of life, genetic therapy, professional ethics, research, and others.  Opportunities will be provided to examine particular cases in order to sharpen participants' skills in bioethical analysis and to develop a framework in which to consider new issues as they develop.

Pastoral Theology

PTHM 401 01A Evangelization and Catechesis (3)

  • Jeff Kaster
  • Monday 8:00-11:10 AM
  • This course examines contemporary theologies and principles of evangelization and catechesis, theories of human and faith development, and various models and methods of evangelization and catechesis. Particular attention will be given to advancing catechetical leadership skills in assessment and strategic planning for program improvement.

PTHM 412 01A Clinical Pastoral Education (4)

  • Barbara Sutton
  • TBA
  • Students participate in a basic unit of an accredited Clinical Pastoral Education program.

PTHM 459 01A- 09A Practicum/Theological Reflection (1-6)

  • Barbara Sutton
  • Wednesday 6:00-9:00 PM OR Friday 9:00 AM -12:00 noon

Practicum I required meetings, in addition to 3 TR peer sessions: January 27, February 3, February 10, May 5

Practicum II required meetings, in addition to 3 TR peer sessions: January 25, February 1, February 8, May 3

  • Students work with an organization, project, or parish in the area of their ministerial interest. The supervised experience requires students to integrate theological competence with pastoral practice in developing vocational identity as a public minister, exploring issues of leadership, power and authority; and gaining facility in articulating the Christian faith and in fostering the development of faith with others. Students will reflect on the practice of ministry in theological reflection groups.

Focus Areas:

  • 01A General Parish
  • 02A Religious Education
  • 03A Social Ministry
  • 04A Liturgy
  • 05A Homiletics
  • 06A Pastoral Care
  • 07A Campus Ministry and Young Adult Ministry
  • 08A Spiritual Direction (see special listing)
  • 09A Ministry on the Margins

PTHM 459 08A Spiritual Direction Practicum/Theological Reflection (1 or 2 credits)

  • Becky Van Ness
  • Monday 6:00-8:00 PM
  • Jan 30, Feb 27, March 27, April 24

PTHM 465 01A Integration Seminar (3)

Kathleen Cahalan

  • Tuesday 6:00-9:15 PM
  • This course represents the culmination of the student's preparation for ministry. Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze and construct a response to pastoral situations utilizing biblical, theological, historical, and social scientific resources. Students will develop goals for ongoing theological education and spiritual formation.

Scripture

SSNT 420 01A Synoptic Gospels (3)

  • Charles Bobertz
  • Tuesday 1:15-4:25 PM
  • This study investigates the interrelated histories and theologies of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke within an analysis of the Synoptic problem.

SSOT 412 01A Prophets (3)

  • Dale Launderville, OSB
  • Wednesday 8:00-11:10 AM//Web Class
  • This course studies the phenomenon of prophecy and introduces the problems relating to the composition and liter¬ary genre of selected Old Testament prophetic books. Included is an exegetical treatment of significant units. The relevance of the prophetic message in contemporary church and society is given further consideration.

Languages

LANG 402 01A Reading Latin II (3)

  • Jason Schlude
  • Monday/Wednesday/Friday 9:10-10:05 AM
  • Continuation of an overview the grammatical structure of the language and practice in reading. Ecclesiastical resources will be utilized for reading proficiency preparation. Graded A-F or pass/fail.

SSNT 402 01A New Testament Greek II (3)

  • Scott Richardson
  • Monday/Wednesday/Friday 9:10-10:05 AM
  • Continuation: The instruction emphasizes reading comprehension of New Testament Greek with the aid of a dictionary. It includes the study of grammar with an eye toward its practical application. Biblical Resources will be utilized for reading proficiency preparation.
  • Graded A-F or pass/fail.

Capstone

THY 580 01A Thesis (6)

  • Dale Launderville, OSB
  • TBA

THY 598 01A Reading for Comprehensive Exams (1-6)

  • Dale Launderville, OSB
  • TBA

THY 599 01A Comprehensive Exams

  • Dale Launderville, OSB
  • TBA

2017 Spring Online Classes

SSOT 412 Prophets (3)

  • Dale Launderville, OSB
  • WEB Class//Wednesdays, 8:00-11:10 AM
  • This course studies the phenomenon of prophecy and introduces the problems relating to the composition and liter¬ary genre of selected Old Testament prophetic books. Included is an exegetical treatment of significant units. The relevance of the prophetic message in contemporary church and society is given further consideration.

SPIR 437 01A The Practice of Discernment in Prayer (1)

  • Becky Van Ness
  • WEB Class; Required Campus Meeting Sunday, June 11, 2017, 1:00-4:30 PM
  • An exploration of how our personal image of God evolves as we discern God's ways of being present to us in prayer and in life. By both studying and practicing discernment of spirits we can become sensitive to inner movements, understanding where they come from and where they lead us. The course includes an introduction to the practice of lectio divina applied to our lived experience. Grading is S/U.

Existing Students Registration (Banner)| New Students Registration