Spring 2018 Courses

SOCI 111       INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY

       MWF 10:20am-11:15am                         SIMNS-G30                                              Dr. Sheila Nelson

       TR       11:10am-12:30pm                        SIMNS-G40                                              Dr. Jeff Kamakahi

       TR       9:35am-10:55am                          SIMNS-G40                                              Dr. Jeff Kamakahi

 

SOCI 121       INTRO TO ANTHROPOLOGY

       MWF   9:10am-10:05am                         SIMNS-360                                               Dr. Megan Sheehan           

       MWF   10:20am-11:15am                       SIMNS-360                                               Dr. Megan Sheehan

 

SOCI 304       SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY 

       TR       9:35am-10:55am                          SIMNS-310                                              Dr. Michael Rosenbaum

This course focuses on the central ideas and assumptions of the founders of modern Sociology: Durkheim, Weber, Marx, Simmel, and Mead.  We will read these influential theorists’ original work, discuss the epistemological significance of sociological theory, survey recent schools of thought and intellectual trajectories within the discipline, and apply sociological theory to contemporary issues.

 

SOCI 322       TRANSNATIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY

       TR       9:35am-10:55am                          QUAD-447                                                Dr. Ellen Block     

Cultures and cultural groups have never been bounded to a single location – people have always been in movement, learning from people outside their cultural groups, and hybridizing ideas and ways of life. This course uses cultural anthropology theory and method to study transnational cultural groups that are present in contemporary Minnesota. In particular, we will study ethnographic manuscripts about Hmong, Somali, and Mexican people and topics including ethnicity, migration, refugeeism, tourism, nomadism, political economy, and medical anthropology

 

SOCI 329       FAMILY & SOCIETY 

       MWF   1:50pm-2:45pm                           SIMNS-360                                               Dr. Sheila Nelson

Examines the historical development of the family as a social institution, the relationship between families and social class, interpersonal relationships within families, changes in family structure, and the impact of public policy on families.

 

SOCI 337H      CULTURAL THOUGHT & MEANING

       Wednesday 6:15pm-9:15pm                  SIMNS-360                                               Dr. Megan Sheehan

How have engagements with cultural "others" helped create knowledge, expand our understanding of ourselves and the world, and inspired us to think about humanity? In this class, we will learn about some of the key theoretical paradigms in cultural anthropology, from its earliest inception through contemporary, experimental anthropological thought. As anthropological theory must be deployed in ethnographic practice to have any effect, theoretical material in this class will be paired with ethnographies, articles, manuscripts, and films-which exemplify, challenge, and build upon abstract concepts

 

SOCI 337M    MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

       TR       12:45pm-2:05pm                          SIMNS-360                                               Dr. Ellen Block

Medical anthropology seeks to understand human health and wellbeing, the experience and distribution of illness, and methods of healing across cultures.  While illness and health are universal concepts, the specific conditions that lead to illness and health, and the understanding of what these various states do to one’s body and one’s spirit, vary greatly. In our biomedically-oriented society, we often take for granted the various ways that culture, political economy, social structures, religion, and environment impact health. In this course, we explore the cultural variations that exist in the ways people experience, diagnose, and treat illnesses.  We will cover a variety of topics from childhood disease and stress to medical travel and pharmaceutical marketing. The course readings will be rooted in ethnographic inquiry – that is, we will read about the lived experiences of people seeking health and healing, the methods anthropologists use to collect such data, and the theories that help us explain them. Course readings include a graphic novel about medical promise, an ethnography about Malawian medical students, and numerous case studies from all over the world that will bring us closer to understanding the various and complex ways people experience health, illness, and healing.

 

SOCI 341       URBAN STUDIES

       TR       12:45pm-2:05pm                          QUAD-247                                                Dr. Michael Rosenbaum

Urban Sociology is exactly what it sounds like—the study of the city from a sociological perspective, whether 19th century Berlin, 20th century Chicago, or 21st century Los Angeles. Urbanization was a seminal force in the origin of Sociology as an academic discipline, and there is now a significant history of sociological research investigating urban growth patterns and their effects on community, culture, and interaction. The city is a built environment that lends material form to social relations. We will study how people interact with the city, and how the city structures people’s interactions with others. Liberating for many, the city offers unprecedented access to a cornucopia of subcultures, lifestyles, and communities. For many others, the city constrains opportunity in unprecedented ways.