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S. Ryan Vidrine ’08

Ability of salivary osmolality to predict urine osmolality and hydration status in athletes

To convey the case of collecting saliva to use as a marker for hydration status, and to compare the use of saliva to urine as a hydration screening tool. 17 NCAA Division III male athletes volunteered to participate.  Saliva and urine samples were collected every 30 minutes over 60 minutes of aerobic exercise and then 120 minutes of rehydration. Sample osmolality was determined using the Fiske 110 osmometer. Linear regressions were performed to determine that salivary osmolality did not highly predict urine osmolality (correlation coefficient -= 0.236). The data shows that saliva osmolality does not highly correlate with urine osmolality, but it does not rule out saliva as a potential research tool in determining hydration status. Further research is needed to determine other variables that may affect saliva osmolality as well as to determine saliva's usefulness as a predictor of hydration status.

 Ryan Vidrine and his research advisor Erin Kronenberg at the Northland Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine where Ryan presented his research,  March 28, 2008, St. Cloud, MN

To view Poster, click on link below:
Ability of salivary osmolality to predict urine osmolality and hydration status in athletes

Research Advisor: Erin Kronenberg, MS