Dress Code

This dress code was established with student input as stipulated in the NSNA Bill of Rights and Responsibilities for Students of Nursing.

Classroom
There is no established dress code for regular classroom attendance of courses in the Nursing Department. Students are advised to consult either the Bennie Book (CSB students) or The J-Book (SJU students) for information for any college/university policies related to dress code.

Clinical
Each student represents the professional standards of the CSB/SJU Nursing Department. Therefore, general uniform standards must be followed in each clinical area, and specific codes must be followed to accommodate different institutional preferences. Furthermore, these requirements may be amended at the discretion of the clinical faculty.

Faculty in clinical sites shall observe appearance of their students on a daily basis and insure compliance with the dress code policy for that institution. Because you are students and not employees of the clinical agencies where you do your clinical experiences, faculty have the discretion to decide what is professional attire and final decision on dress code implementation. Students not in compliance or properly attired, may be sent off the clinical unit, which may negatively impact your course grade.

Clinical Dress Code Policy for Most Acute Care Settings (also applies to laboratory testing situations and designated simulation experiences)

  1. Clean solid-colored (a modest color, not neon) enclosed, flat-heeled shoes, and clean school uniform (unless otherwise specified in course syllabus) with prominent display of CSB/SJU name tag. If tennis/jogging shoes are worn, they must be a solid neutral color.

Rationale: Professional appearance and aesthetic value to clients and colleagues as well as freedom from bacteria.

  1. Hair should not be worn longer than collar length or should be pulled back and secured with neutral elastic. Only small hair adornments are acceptable. This can be individually stipulated for unique clinical settings. Mustache or beards must be neatly groomed and relatively close to the face. Fad hairstyles and hair dyed in unnatural colors are not allowed.

Rationale: Hair can be a fomite for bacteria and can contaminate food and procedures as well as be offensive to the client.

  1. Earring posts or small unobtrusive earrings may be worn (no more than two per ear). No other visible body piercing. Religious necklaces and jewelry may be worn inside the uniform.

Rationale: Large or inappropriately dressy earrings or jewelry can be offensive as well as hazardous.

  1. Nails must be short and clean. Artificial nails or nail tips are not acceptable.

Rationale: Long fingernails can injure the client and artificial nails harbor bacteria.

  1. No strong perfumes or colognes or aftershaves can be worn. No offensive body odor. All students are required to maintain high standards of personal cleanliness.

Rationale: Strong and varied odors can be offensive to clients and co-workers. Some people are allergic or sensitive to scents.

  1. Moderate make-up allowed. Discretion should be employed. Excessive tattoos must not be visible.

Rationale: Non-professional appearance may be offensive in a multicultural society.

  1. If a lab coat is worn, it must be clean and pressed with an appropriate CSB/SJU name tag which is visible at all times.

Rationale: Professional appearance to clients and colleagues as well as freedom from bacteria.

  1. Rings should be kept to a minimum. Jewelry should not interfere with job performance and client safety-no dangling earrings, necklaces, or bracelets.

Rationale: Rings can harbor bacteria, can injure clients, and can be misplaced or lost.

  1. Name tags should be visible in any clinical setting.
  2. Student uniforms are to be worn only in the clinical or lab area or while traveling between home and the hospital. They are not to be worn on campus or elsewhere.

Rationale: Freedom from bacteria for clients and campus contacts.

Clinical Dress Code Policy for Psychiatric-Mental Health, Community, and Other Settings

  1. No jeans. No sleeveless shirts/blouses, halter-tops, see-through blouses, athletic attire (sweatshirts, sweatpants, and jogging suits), tight knit clothing, imprinted t-shirts and any type of attire which is low-cut or where the midriff or chest is exposed may be worn. Extreme styles should be avoided. Hair, beards, and mustaches should be neatly groomed. This can be individually stipulated for unique clinical settings. Fad hairstyles and hair dyed in unnatural colors are not allowed.

Rationale: Unprofessional attire and appearance and may be offensive to the client.

  1. Nails must be short and clean. Artificial nails or nail tips are not acceptable.

Rationale: Long fingernails can injure the client and artificial nails harbor bacteria.

  1. No strong perfumes or colognes or aftershaves can be worn. No offensive body odor.

Rationale: Strong and varied odors can be offensive to clients and co-workers. Some people are allergic to scents.

  1. Moderate make-up allowed. Discretion should be employed. Excessive tattoos must not be visible.

Rationale: Non-professional appearance may be offensive in a multicultural society.

  1. If a lab coat is worn, it must be clean and pressed with an appropriate CSB/SJU name tag which is visible at all times.

Rationale: Professional appearance to clients and colleagues as well as freedom from bacteria.

  1. Rings should be kept to a minimum. Jewelry should not interfere with job performance and client safety-no dangling earrings, necklaces, or bracelets.

Rationale: Rings can harbor bacteria, can injure clients, and can be misplaced or lost.

Note: Some courses or clinical experiences necessitate the students be advised by individual faculty regarding appropriate attire. Each course may specific specify requirements in the course syllabus.

Approved by Faculty Organization 12/10/2012. Students notified of the policy update on 12/12/12 via email.