Curriculum

Approved Student Learning Outcomes

Within the context of a liberal education and grounded in Catholic principles and Benedictine values graduates will:

- Provide quality and safe nursing care across the levels of prevention.

- Apply transformational leadership principles in the coordination and delivery of healthcare.

- Apply principles of global citizenship to advocate for and improve health care.

 

Curriculum Plan for Nursing Program

The nursing curriculum is highly structured and requires careful planning to complete in four years. The Academic Planner listed below provides the four year plan of courses for nursing students. 

Academic Planner - Nursing Major

 

Prerequisite Course Descriptions

Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Biology (BIOL 121)

An introduction to biological chemistry, cell structure, metabolism, classical and molecular genetics. Laboratories provide the students with opportunities to investigate living organisms at a cellular and molecular level. Intended for science majors. Fall.

 

Microbiology (BIOL 212)

Survey of microorganisms emphasizing those that cause disease. Topics include morphology and physiology of microorganisms, sterilization, disinfection, and specific diseases and their causative agents. Laboratory work emphasizes aseptic technique.

 

Introductory Psychology (PSYC 111)

Prerequisite to all upper-division psychology courses. Survey of the major content areas of psychology, introducing the basic vocabulary, concepts, principles, and theories of the discipline. Specific topics include history and methods of psychology; biological bases of behavior; sensation and perception; learning and memory; cognition, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; lifespan development; personality; psychological disorders; psychological treatment/psychotherapy; and social psychology. Students must register for PSYC 111L (lab) during the same semester as PSYC111.  The PSYC 111 labs operate independently from the lecture series and are an opportunity to give students direct experience with psychological concepts and research techniques that might not be covered as in depth during lecture. 

 

Introduction to Chemical Structure and Properties (CHEM 125)

And introductory chemistry course in which students study how the structure of atoms, ions, and molecules determine their physical and chemical properties.  Starting with atoms and their electron configurations, students build a progressive and linked understanding of bonding, ionic and molecular geometry, and physical and chemical properties that emerge from structure.  Intended as a first course for students majoring in the natural sciences. 

 

Concepts of Nutrition Science (NUTR 125)

Basic concepts of nutrition are introduced emphasizing the role of nutrition in health. Topics include: Dietary Guidelines, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, and minerals; energy balance and weight control, sports nutrition and fitness; and food safety. Students are provided the opportunity to assess their own nutritional status through computerized diet analysis, blood cholesterol and glucose screening, and to learn principles of diet planning and food selection to promote health through a variety of hands-on experiences in the lab setting. Laboratory. Fall and spring.

 

Conversations in Culture (NRSG 220)

The course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive view of the Hmong culture including social, political, and historical factors that have shaped it and continue to affect it. Students will understand that the Hmong culture is neither static nor monolithic, but rather shaped by gender, class, personal experience, migration patterns, and other factors. An exploration of the Hmong migration patterns will allow students to examine culture change as the Hmong people live and interact in refugee camps, and in the United States and other regions. Students will also be asked to explore their own cultural identity through self-awareness and assessment and articulate how their cultural identity shapes their interactions with those from another culture. 

 

Corequisite Course Descriptions

Statistics (MATH 124, PSYC 221, SOCI 201)

Graphs and charts, mean, median and other measures of location. Terminology and rules of elementary probability; normal distribution, random sampling, estimation of mean, standard deviation and proportions, correlation and regression, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses. Prerequisites: three years of college preparatory mathematics.

 

Developmental Psychology (PSYC 360)

The study of age-related changes that occur as the individual moves through life. Major theoretical perspectives, concepts, and research methods for examining physical, cognitive, moral and social-emotional development. Prerequisite: 111.

 

Human Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL 325)

Integrated study of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body, with emphasis placed on structure-function relationships.  Major concepts stressed are how function at the cellular level governs events observable at the tissue, organ, or systemic tier, and physiological mechanisms necessary for homeostasis.  Topics covered include excitable tissue, skeletal system, nervous system, muscular system, endocrine system.  Laboratory component involves dissection exercises, study of human models, and inquiry-based investigations of muscle physiology and nervous system function.  Prerequisites:  121, 221 and CHEM 123 or instructor's consent.  Fall.

 

Human Anatomy and Physiology II (BIOL 326)

Integrated study of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body, with emphasis placed on structure-function relationships. Major concepts stressed are how function at the cellular level governs events observable at the tissue, organ, or systemic tier, and physiological mechanism necessary for homeostasis. Topics covered include the cardiovascular system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, reproductive system and water, electrolyte and acid-base balance. Laboratory component involves dissection exercises, study of human models, inquiry-based investigations of cardiovascular, respiratory, and urinary system physiology, and a group independent research project. Prerequisite: 325 or instructor's consent. Spring.

 

Nursing Major Course Descriptions

NRSG 240 Core Concepts I: Primary Prevention

This course is an introduction to core concepts of nursing, which includes professional standards and values, caring, levels of prevention focusing on health and wellness, teaching/learning and motivation for behavior change. The development and beginning application of therapeutic interpersonal communication skills will be addressed.

 

NRSG 341 Core Concepts II: Secondary Prevention

This course focuses on the concepts related to secondary prevention (early identification and intervention) in the care of acutely ill individuals.  The primary concepts addressed are: clinical reasoning, crisis communication and health care systems in the context of acute mental and physical illness and injury across the lifespan. Application of these concepts will occur in Clinical Nursing II.

 

NRSG 342 Core Concepts III: Tertiary Prevention

This course focuses on the concepts related to tertiary prevention (restoring optimal level of functioning).  The primary concepts addressed are: family as context, end-of-life care, rehabilitation, grief and loss, advocacy, and chronic mental and physical illnesses across the lifespan. Application of these concepts will occur in Clinical Nursing III.

 

NRSG 343 Core Concepts IV:  Integration of Levels of Prevention in Nursing Care of Populations

This course focuses on integrating the Levels of Prevention in the care of communities and populations across the lifespan. The primary concepts addressed are community as client and local/global public health. Application of these concepts will occur in Clinical Nursing IV.

 

NRSG 211 Integrated Pathophysiology and Pharmacology I

This is part one of a two-course sequence that builds upon scientific knowledge and focuses on foundational pathophysiology, psychopathology and pharmacology concepts. The course emphasizes selected clinical models and treatments to illustrate these concepts. 

 

NRSG 311 Integrated Pathophysiology and Pharmacology II

This is part two of a two-course sequence that builds upon scientific knowledge and focuses on advanced pathophysiology, psychopathology and pharmacology concepts. The course emphasizes increasingly complex clinical models and related treatments to illustrate these concepts.

  

NRSG 255 Leadership I: Introduction to Transformational Leadership

This course introduces selected leadership concepts, research and evidence-based practice, health literacy, and information technologies. Students are expected to develop the skills necessary for evaluating evidence to promote quality and safe nursing care and to function effectively in an interdisciplinary team.

 

NRSG 355 Leadership II: Leading Transformational Teams

Within the context of a liberal learning environment and Catholic and Benedictine values, learners will develop professional knowledge and skills to effectively integrate designer, manager, and coordinator of care roles in professional nursing practice.

 

NRSG 356 Leadership III: Leading Transformational Systems

Within the context of a liberal learning environment, Catholic and the Benedictine traditions and values, students will explore factors that influence the development and sustainability of complex organizational systems and their role within those systems. Students will be actively involved in policies that shape health and/or health care. Students will be expected to articulate their leadership role as an entry level professional nurse.

 

NRSG 201 Clinical Nursing I: Implementing Primary Prevention

In the context of health promotion across the lifespan, this course provides a foundation for quality and safe nursing care through holistic assessment, technical skills, and application of professional nursing standards, evidence based practice and teaching/learning principles. This course will provide clinical experiences for application of concepts taught in the Core Concepts I, Leadership I, and Integrative Sciences I courses.

 

NRSG 301 Clinical Nursing II: Implementing Secondary Prevention

In the context of secondary prevention across the lifespan, this course provides the application of quality and safe, culturally relevant patient centered nursing care in acute care environments. The emphasis of this course will be on the utilization of clinical reasoning models, inter/intra disciplinary collaboration, and crisis communication. This course will provide clinical experiences for application of concepts taught in all concurrent and previous courses.

 

NRSG 302 Clinical Nursing III: Implementing Tertiary Prevention

In the context of tertiary prevention across the lifespan, this course provides the environment for application of quality and safe, culturally relevant family-centered nursing care in chronic physical and mental illness situations. The emphasis of this course will be on family assessment, genomics, chronic illness, co-morbidities, transitional care, and end-of-life care. This course will provide clinical experiences for application of concepts taught in all concurrent and previous courses.

 

NRSG 303 Clinical Nursing IV: Implementing Community-Based Nursing Care

In the context of integrating levels of prevention across the lifespan, the emphasis of this course will be on providing quality, safe nursing with populations to affect change in the community. This course will provide clinical experiences for application of concepts taught in all concurrent and previous courses. 

 

 NRSG 395 Nursing Capstone

Utilizing knowledge and skills acquired in both nursing and liberal arts courses, this course emphasizes the integration of the full baccalaureate professional nurse role as provider, designer, and coordinator of care, and member of a profession. This course will require application of concepts taught in all concurrent and previous courses. These experiences will occur in a variety of health care settings. This course meets the college requirement for experiential learning and capstone.

 

Common Curriculum courses

First Year Seminar (FYS 100, FYS 101)

Ethics Common Seminar

Humanities

Gender

Theology-lower division

Theology-upper division

Fine Arts

Social Science

Natural Science

Mathematics

Global Language Proficiency