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Courses

Art 309A Art/Religion:Spain Americas

This course explores the transmigration of Christian art and iconography from Spain, including its Jewish and Muslim influences and its convergence with indigenous cultures and African expressions in the Americas. The course will consider the ways religious art and iconography reflects, transmits, changes and maintains theological, socio--]political, cultural, and aesthetic meanings over space and time. Designed with an art historical focus with attention to theological issues, interdisciplinary methods will be used to assess religious imagery, devotional objects, and sacred spaces that continue to hold significance for Latin American and Latino/a populations today.

Art 309B Latin American Art & Culture

The study of artistic phenomena is a useful tool for an in-depth study of a culture. This course aims to promote the understanding of Latin American artistic forms from the pre-Columbian world to the popular expressions of the Twentieth Century, seeking, in its iconography and morphology, signs of cultural identity of the nations found on in Central America and the South American continent. This course will count toward the culture requirement in the Hispanic Studies major. This course will count toward the LLAS minor. Prerequisite HISP 312 or concurrent enrollment in HIPS 316. Offered periodically.

GBUS 338 Doing Business in Latin America
This course will focus on Latin America. Students will learn about the cultural milieu in a variety of Latin American countries, and the impact of that milieu on business practice. We will study the strategic environment of doing business in Latin America, learn about major Latin American businesses, and immerse ourselves in Latin American business practices. Prerequisite GBUS 210, 220, 230, and 240 or permission of instructor.

History121:  Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas: From Indigenous Empires to Conquered Peoples
This course examines the development of indigenous civilizations in Mesoamerica and the Andes from 1200, paying particular attention to the rise of the Aztec and Inca Empires. Investigates the Spanish conquest of the Americas in the 1500s and its consequences, focusing on how indigenous peoples and European settlers through conflict and cooperation created new, hybrid societies and cultures in the colonial New World.

History122: Revolution and Repression in Modern Latin America
This course examines revolutionary and reform movements in twentieth-century Latin America and the social and economic conditions that shaped them. Also investigates conservative reaction to revolution and the repression it unleashed. Ends by examining the decline of revolution and dictatorship and the return to democracy in contemporary Latin America.

History 321: Colonial Mexico
This course begins with the Spanish conquest and ends with Independence from Spain in 1821. Includes the consequences of the conquest for Native Americans, the formation of new hybrid societies and cultures in a racially diverse world, gender relations, religion and the church, and 18th-century efforts to reform Mexican society according to Enlightenment ideals.

History 322: Modern Mexico
This course traces the history of Mexico from Independence in 1821 to the present. Although we will examine Mexico's political development since 1821, this course focuses mostly on the social and cultural history of Mexico. We will explore Mexico's ethnic diversity, national identity, religious traditions, and gender patterns and how all these elements changed over time-from a chaotic nineteenth attempt to forge an independent nation, through the throws of the Mexican Revolution, to the present-day struggles between the state and drug cartels.

History 323: Religion in Latin America
This course studies the changing nature of religious cultures in Latin America from the pre-Columbian period to the present day. Includes the study of indigenous religious practices, the European “spiritual conquest” of the New World, the creation of syncretic forms of Catholicism, 19th century conflicts between religion and secularism, the spread of Protestantism in the 20th century, and the advent and course of liberation theology in Latin America. Within a historical context, examines the role of religion in shaping sense of self, forms of community, and human interaction with the physical world. Prerequisites: None.

History 324: Topics in Modern Latin American History (Guatemala)
Latin America is comprised of nearly 30 countries (depending on who’s counting) with very different histories especially in the post-colonial era (after 1800). The purpose of this course is to avoid deceptive over-generalizations about a complex region and (on a more positive note) provide historical perspective on issues of special interest to North American students. Course toics will vary. (Study abroad only.)

Hispanic Studies 321 Mayan Societies: History, Politics and Economy (Guatemala)
How should Mayan societies in Guatemala be understood? What reading should be given to the "original" demands of Mayan culture in the context of a globalized economy? What are the historical and contemporary constructions of autonomy and self-governance in Mayan societies? These are the questions that form the basis of the course, Sociedades Mayas: Historia, Política y Economía. We will approach the subject by analyzing these questions through reading contemporary and historical texts that suggest various possible responses. This course will count toward the culture requirement in the Hispanic Studies major. This course will count toward the LLAS minor. Prereq: HISP 312 or concurrent enrollment in HISP 316. (Taught in Spanish).

Hispanic Studies 328 History of Chile (Chile)
This course will provide a panoramic view of the problems, ideologies and political and economic realities Chile has faced throughout its history. It will include the study of the indigenous state in Chile prior to the arrival of the Spaniards and their current role in Chilean society. The course will end with an analysis of the political, social and economic conflicts during the century. This course will count toward the culture requirement in the Hispanic Studies major. This course will count toward the LLAS minor. Prerequisite HISP 312 or concurrent enrollment in HISP 316.

HISP 329 Seminar on Latin American Literature (Chile)

HISP 330 Latin American Society and Cinema (Chile)

Hispanic Studies 336: Latin American Culture

This course examines the political, social, cultural and historical development of the Spanish-speaking Americas. In geographic terms, the course includes countries of North, Central and South America as well as the Caribbean. Historically, the course covers the period prior to the Conquest, the Colonial era, the emergence of national identities, and current cultural trends, issues and conflicts. The primary texts of the course—whether these be literary, visual, performative, or ideological in character—will be approached in an interdisciplinary fashion that combines socio-historical, political and literary critical perspectives. Prerequisite: Spanish 312 or 316. Offered in Fall.

Hispanic Studies 337: Latino Identity in the United States
The diverse population of Latino groups traces its origins to a variety of countries and their experience in the United States is quite varied. This course will examine the socio-historical background and economic and political factors that converge to shape Latino/Hispanic identities in the United States. This class will explore issues of race, class, and gender within the Latino community in the United States (Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, Central and South America). Prerequisites: 312 or 316.Offered in Spring.

Hispanic Studies 340: Latin America: Conquest and Colonization
This course examines the origins of regional literature in the period of the Spanish Conquest and colonization of the indigenous peoples of the Americas. Representative literary texts—encompassing genres such as essay, chronicle and biography among others—will serve as the basis for a study of the historical development of regional literary traditions out of the cultural conflicts and transformations of the colonial period. Prerequisite: Spanish 312 or 316.

Hispanic Studies 342: Latin America: Autonomy, Nation and Identity  
This course examines the emergence and development of regional and national literary traditions in the Spanish-speaking Americas following Independence of Spain. Works from a variety of genres, such as poetry, essay and the novel, will be used to explore important aesthetic, economic and political manifestations of the nineteenth-century quest for autonomy and development in Latin America. Prerequisite: Spanish 312 or 316.

Hispanic Studies 345: Modern Latin America through Literature
A study of major themes and works of contemporary narrative, criticism, poetry. This course examines the historical background of the texts under study as well as the emerging literary and cultural debates surrounding them. Prerequisite: Spanish 312 or 316.

Hispanic Studies 355: Seminar: Topics in Hispanic Literature (with LLAS topic)
An in-depth study of a particular work, author, or theme in Hispanic literature or language. The precise subject to be studied will be announced prior to registration. Recent topics include: the picaresque novel; literature of the gaucho; women authors; Siglo de Oro; Generación del 98; Spanish drama from Lope de Vega to Buero Vallejo; Latin America short story. Prerequisites: 312  or 316 and one upper-division course in linguistics, literature or culture. (To count toward the LLAS Minor the topic must be a Latino or Latin American topic.)

Hispanic Studies 356: Seminar: Topics in Hispanic Culture
An in-depth study of cultural issues in the Spanish-speaking world. The precise subject to be studied will be announced prior to registration. Recent topics include: race, gender, ethnicity, national identity and its construction/invention, globalization, etc. Prerequisites: 312 or 316 and one upper-division course in linguistics, literature or culture. (To count toward the LLAS Minor the topic must be a Latino or Latin American topic.)

HISP 357 International Relations between Latin America and the U.S. (Chile)

Latino/Latin American Studies 270: Readings in Latino/Latin American Studies
Readings and discussions in specific areas of Latino/Latin American Studies. Topics tied to on-campus lectures, performances, or exhibits presented by invited speakers or artists. Approval of the Latino/Latin American Studies Rpogram Chair and/or the faculty moderator of the reading circle required. This course can be repeated for credit with the permission of the Program Director. S-U grading only.

Latino/Latin American Studies 280A Politics & Society in Cuba
Study in Cuba provides a unique opportunity to learn about a nation's past and present. It remains a mystery to many and hostile relations between the governments of the United States and Cuba have sharply limited contact between the two countries for almost forty years. Current U.S. law still restricts the travel of U.S. citizens to the island nation. However, this course, which will obtain legal permission to be in Cuba, is a unique opportunity to study Cuban history and the political and economic system of one of the world's few remaining socialist countries. Students do reading on the historic background of the area under study and then focus on contemporary political, social, and economic issues through meetings with resource people: professors, political and religious leaders, and grass roots organizers. The course will be conducted in English but knowledge of Spanish will definitely enhance appreciation of our stay in Cuba and study of Cuban history, politics and society. Offered for A-F Grading only.

Latino/Latin American Studies 280B Brazil: People & Culture
On the Brazil short term program, students will live on an island in southeastern Brazil called Florianopolis (known as Floripa). Florianopolis is a modern and cosmopolitan area with over 42 beaches, rolling mountains, the Atlantic rainforest, and soft white sand dunes. Expect to cook and eat regional food, learn some survival Porteguese, and participate in Brazilian dance! On this short -term program, you will discuss and reflect on your experiences in Brazil, and complete required coursework.

Latino/Latin American Studies 360 Topics in LLAS
An in-depth examination of selected topics in Latino/Latin American Studies at the upper-division level. Course may be repeated when topics vary and with consent of the LLAS Program Chair.

Latino/Latin American Studies 371 Individual Learning Project
Supervised reading or research in Latino/Latin American Studies at the upper-division level. Permission of LLAS Program Chair required.

Political Science 347: Latin American Politics
Comparative analysis of Latin American politics focusing on the themes of the military in politics, economic dependency, reform and revolution, and agrarian reform. Case studies include Mexico, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Nicaragua and Cuba.

Theology 317 Religion in Latin America
The changing nature of religious cultures in Latin America from the pre-Columbian period to the present day. Includes the study of indigenous religious practices, the European "spiritual conquest" of the New World, the creation of syncretic forms of Catholicism, 19th century conflicts between religion and secularism, the spread of Protestantism in the 20th century, and the advent and course of liberation theology in Latin America. Within a historical context, examines the role of religion in shaping sense of self, forms of community, and human interaction with the physical world. Usually offered every third semester. Prerequisite: THEO 111 or HONR 240A

Theology 328: Hispanic Theology in the US
This course explores how U.S. Hispanic experiences (of religion, culture, gender, etc.) mediate theological approaches to the Bible and Christian doctrines. It offers a survey of the origins and presence of U.S. Hispanic communities and examines central biblical and theological themes in the writings of contemporary U.S. Hispanic theologians. Prerequisite: THEO 111 or HONR 240A

Theology 329D Theologies of Liberation
Liberation theology is the name for a well-known and, to some, notorious form of religious action and reflection that emerged in Latin American some forty years ago. Today, it has now grown into a family of related though different theologies, which have similar methods, and which all start for the experience of oppression. Although Latin American theology of liberation is perhaps the most influential expression of this relation in the twentieth century, other forms of religious reflection owe a debt to liberation theology, even as they add to the profundity of its insights. This course will begin with Latin American liberation theology and then turn to the work of black, feminist, womanist, U.S. Latino/a, gay/lesbian and ecological theologies to broaden our understanding of the relationship between the Gospels and the imperative to structural change in our society. Prerequisite THEO 111 or HONR 240A

Theology 339E Art/Religion: Spain/Americas
This course explores the transmigration of Christian art and iconography from Spain, including its Jewish and Muslim influences and its convergence with indigenous cultures and African expressions in the Americas. The course will consider the ways religious art and iconography reflects, transmits, changes and maintains theological, socio--]political, cultural, and aesthetic meanings over space and time. Designed with an art historical focus with attention to theological issues, interdisciplinary methods will be used to assess religious imagery, devotional objects, and sacred spaces that continue to hold significance for Latin American and Latino/a populations today.