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Spring 2018 Course Offerings

HONR 210D ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE: THE INTERRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN HUMANS AND EARTH SYSTEMS (NS) 
Dr. Anna McKenna, MWF, 9:30am-11:35am, HAB-115

A study of environmental science and current issues involving the interrelationships between human enterprises and natural systems, focusing on the impact that humans have had on the environment. Class topics include climate change, the use of natural resources and the alteration of natural systems, focusing on the challenges and opportunities to minimize human impact on the earth. Laboratory experiments, integrated into the class period, will provide concrete, hands-on experience with the scientific topics discussed.

HONR 230G PHILOSOPHY OF MUSIC (FA)  
Dr. Erica Stonestreet, TR, 11:10am-12:30pm, QUAD-349 

Philosophy of Music will help students reflect more deeply on their experiences of music. Most people experience music on a basic level of emotion and are left with an overall impression; those educated in music are able to more readily recognize forms, musical references, and context in more detail. But few of either group has thought systematically about what music is, whether music possesses meaning, and, if so, how that meaning is conveyed or expressed. These are central issues in the philosophy of music and will be central issues in our course. We will begin by giving some attention to the history of musical aesthetics to develop a context for these questions, but the greatest emphasis will be on exploring them in the context of our world today. The course will present divergent philosophical theories that will be considered with respect to a wide range of music including Western “classical” music, music of non-Western cultures, and the popular music many of us enjoy. Class will regularly involve discussing philosophical readings and musical selections.

HONR 240A THEOLOGICAL EXPLORATIONS (TH)  (4)
Dr. Kristin Colberg, MWF, 11:30am-12:25pm/MWF, 12:40pm-1:35pm, QUAD-347

This course offers an introduction to the discipline of Christian theology, giving special attention to some of its primary sources, especially Sacred Scripture, and to the ultimate questions and major themes on which theology focuses. All sections of this course share as common learning goals that students demonstrate 1) a capacity to think critically and historically about some primary sources, doctrines, and themes that shape Christian theology, 2) an ability to explain differing viewpoints on at least one contemporary theological issue, and 3) an ability to apply at least one aspect of the Benedictine tradition to at least one of the topics addressed in the course. Nevertheless, each section of the course provides its own distinctive way into the world of theology.

HONR 250T FREEDOM NARRATIVES (HM)  
Dr. Yvette Piggush, MWF, 3:00pm-3:55pm, QUAD-344

Freedom and memory can sometimes seem like opposites in American culture, but these themes are powerfully entwined in stories of resisting and escaping enslavement.  The freedom narratives composed by African Americans and Afro-Britains are one of the most creative and enduring forms of modern literature.  In this class, we will explore how and why enslaved people used story-telling and writing to transmit their gendered experiences of enslavement, resistance, and liberation.  We will also examine how their example and methods gave rise to the modern genre of the neo-slave narrative that continues debate memory, forgetting, and freedom in the Atlantic World.

 

HONR 270A DIRECTED READING  
Dr. Bret Benesh, A-TR, 1:05pm-2:25pm, RICHA-P39

Problem Solving:  How to Solve It. This is a course on problem solving.  The goal of the course would be to teach you how to solve novel problems/puzzles which you have not yet seen how to solve the problem.  We will develop a framework (developed by Polya, Schoenfeld, and others) that could potentially be transferred to all sorts of fields; most of the problems will come from (high school-level) mathematics and logic, although I hope to incorporate some other types of problems, too.

 

HONR 270C PROBLEM SOLVING  
Dr. Sarah Yost, F, 3:00pm-3:55pm, PENGL-212
Prerequisite: MATH 119 & admission to MAPCORES program or consent in instructor.

An introduction to solving complex problems in interdisciplinary topics which will be drawn from mathematics, computer science, and physics. Students will work in groups and present their results.

HONR 311 GREAT BOOKS/IDEAS (HM)  
Dr. Scott Richardson, MWF, 10:20am-11:15am, QUAD-347

A year-long discussion-based seminar for juniors which concentrates on many of the world's greatest works of literature, political philosophy and intellectual history. Authors include Plato, Aristotle, Biblical writers, Augustine, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Goethe, Marx, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Freud, Woolf, Faulkner, O'Connor, and Toni Morrison.  Students selected for this seminar are asked to read a number of novels and plays to prepare themselves for participation.  Applications are taken the spring before the year in which you would like to join this year-long course.

HONR 340B CHRISTIANITY IN RELATION TO JUDAISM (TU)  
Dr. John Merkle, TR, 2:20pm-3:40pm, QUAD-341
Cross-listed with HONR 350C/Prerequisite: THEO 111 or HONR 240A or 240B

This course explores the Jewish tradition, the emergence of Christianity within and from that tradition, the de-Judaization of Christianity, traditional Christian teachings about Judaism, anti-Jewish formulations of Christian faith, contemporary Christian affirmations of Judaism's abiding validity, and the implications of these new affirmations for Christian self-understanding and for Christian-Jewish relations.

HONR 370B RESEARCH SEMINAR  
Dr. Sarah Yost, F, 3:00pm-3:55pm, PENGL-212
Prerequisite: HONR 270C, MATH 120 & admission to MAPCORES program or consent of instructor. 

Solving complex problems in interdisciplinary topics which will be drawn from mathematics, computer science, and physics.  Students will work in groups and present their results.

HONR 390C READING FOR LIFE (ES) 
Dr. Tony Cunningham, T, 6:15pm-9:15pm, QUAD-343

Everyone loves a good story. Great stories can provide us with far more than mere recreation. Stories can provide us with rich character portraits that can reveal the subtleties and nuances of what it means to live well and responsibly. In this course we'll use novels and films to address Socrates' most basic ethical questions, "How should one live?" and "What sort of person should I be?" We'll do so by attending to all the concrete, particular details of real life and fictional characters thoroughly embroiled in the "business of living." Reading well offers the possibility of vicarious experience and ultimately, ethical insight. Our readings will include: The Crucible (Arthur Miller), The Remains of the Day (Kazuo Ishiguro), Beloved (Toni Morrison), How To Be Good (Nick Hornby), Cold Mountain (Charles Frazier), and A Constellation of Vital Phenomena (Anthony Marra).