Generalist Social Work Practice II

SWRK 344-01A

Fall 2000

Instructor: Lynn Bye, M.S.W., Ph.D., LISW

Course Description

This course is designed as one of three methods courses, which completes the introduction to generalist social work practice. The first course (SWRK 343) focused on social work values in generalist practice, basic interpersonal skills necessary for competent social work practice, the strengths perspective and the problem-solving method used in social work assessment and intervention. Generalist Social Work Practice II will give the student an introduction to the use of these social work perspectives and methods with mezzo systems. Students will learn about social work practice in groups including families and organizations. The process and dynamics that occur in mezzo systems will be covered. Students will learn about the stages of group development and specific techniques that can be used to facilitate the problem-solving work at each stage. Practice principles of social work with oppressed and vulnerable people will be discussed. Information will be presented on how the type of work varies depending upon the nature and purpose of the problems presented. The course will emphasize practical skills necessary for generalist practice at the mezzo level.

This course fulfills the following generalist practice program goals and objectives:

1. Students will gain a basic understanding of the history of generalist social work practice with mezzo systems through the following activities:

  • The class lecture and discussion on the history and theory behind generalist social work practice with mezzo systems
  • Reading Chapters 1 and 3 of the Corey and Schneider-Corey book
  • The video Reflections on Social Work With Groups with Mel Goldstein

2. Students will develop critical thinking skills within the context of professional generalist social work practice through the following activities:

  • The lecture and discussion on critical thinking skills and beginning work with mezzo systems
  • Reading chapters 10 and 11 of the Schulman book
  • The video Problem Solving in Groups with Len Brown

3. Students will acquire the values and ethics of the social work profession and an understanding of and respect for the positive value of diversity through the following activities:

  • The class lecture and discussion on social work ethics, values, legal issues
  • Reading chapters 8 and 16 of the Schulman book
  • This goal is also accomplished in the class session on valuing diversity in work with mezzo systems
  • Reading chapter 9 of the Schulman book
  • The video Tale of O.

4. Students will gain knowledge of the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and the strategies of change that advance social and economic justice in generalist practice and is achieved through the following:

  • This goal is accomplished in the class session on valuing diversity in work with mezzo systems
  • Reading chapter 9 of the Schulman book
  • The video Tale of O. The activities in the manual accompanying the video are very useful in helping students learn about subtle mechanisms of oppressions and discrimination.

 

5. Students will gain knowledge of the stages of group development when working with mezzo systems and is achieved though the following:

  • The class lecture, discussion and written reflections on the beginning phase, transition phase, working phase and termination phase of social work with mezzo systems
  • It is also accomplished with in-class simulations of work with mezzo systems.

 

6. Students will gain knowledge of techniques which demonstrate the professional use of self.

This is done through the following:

  • The community project done in conjunction with Country Manor.

 

7. Students will gain knowledge of bio-psycho-social variables that affect individual development and behavior in mezzo systems and is accomplished by the following:

  • The class discussion and written reflections for the class on bio-psycho-social variables.

 

8. Students will gain knowledge of research and findings related to generalist social work practice and is achieved through the following:

  • Reading and discussing the article Multiple-family groups and psychoeducation in the treatment of schizophrenia by McFarlane et al.

 

9. Students will gain knowledge of the value of supervision for evaluating practice.

This is done through the following:

  • The evaluation and feedback provided in conjunction with the major class projects such as the groups led out in the community as well as the proposed group paper and presentation.

Program Objectives

1. Students learn to apply social work values and ethics to practice during the first class of the course when values and ethics is a main theme of the session. Values and ethics continue to be stressed throughout the course.

2. Students accomplish the program objective of understanding the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and strategies of change that advance social and economic justice when reading, The skills of helping individuals, families, groups, and communities (4th ed.), Chapter 9 and Groups: Process and Practice, Chapter 4. This objective is also accomplished by viewing the video Tale of O and reading Groups: Process and Practice, Chapter 12 and the article on Multiple Family Groups and Psychoeducation in the Treatment of Schizophrenia.

3. Students accomplish the objective of being able to apply knowledge of bio-psycho-social variables that affect individual development and behavior in groups when reading about and discussing how to form groups. Activities used to reinforce this information are Chapters 6 and 7 or the Corey and Corey book and the class discussion.

    1. Critical thinking objectives are met by the questions that are asked in each class and the processing of the material read, the role plays, the class activities and the student projects.
    2. Students learn to evaluate research and apply findings to practice with the proposed group paper.

 

Skills

Students will gain skills in:

1. Articulating the history of generalist social work practice with mezzo systems

2. Applying critical thinking skills within the context of generalist social work practice

3. Practicing within the values and ethics of the social work profession

4. Working with mezzo systems in a way that provides support for the oppressed

5. Helping mezzo systems to form

6. Developing contracts with mezzo systems

7. Identifying common themes in mezzo systems

8. Creating a safe environment where people can disagree and challenge each other

9. Using techniques to facilitate group development

10. Using research to inform practice

11. Using supervision to enhance practice

 

Required Reading (Available at the campus bookstore)

Corey, G., Schneider-Corey, M. (1997). Groups: Process and practice (5th ed.). Pacific Grove: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.

McFarlane, W. R., Lukens, E., Link, B., Dushay, R., Deakins, S., Newmark, M., Dunne, E., Horen, B., & Toran, J. (1995). Multiple-family groups and psychoeducation in the treatment of schizophrenia. Archives of General Psychiatry 52, 679-687.

Shulman, Lawrence. (1999). The skills of helping individuals, families, groups, and communities (4th ed.), Itasca, IL: F.E. Peacock Publishers.

Strom-Gottfried, Kim. (1999). Social work practice: Cases, activities, and exercises. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press.

Bibliography

Anderson, J. (1997). Social work with groups: A process model. White Plains, NY: Longman.

Brown, L. N. (1991). Groups for growth and change. White Plains, NY: Longman.

Corey, G., Schneider-Corey, M. (1997). Groups: Process and Practice (5th ed.). Pacific Grove: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.

Garvin, C. D. (1997). Contemporary group work (3rd ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Greif, G. L., & Ephross, P. H. (Eds.). (1997). Group work with populations at risk. New York: Oxford University Press.

Johnson, D. W. and Johnson, F. P. (2000). Joining together: Group theory and group skills (7th ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Locke, B., Garrison, R., and Winship, J. (1998). Generalist social work practice: Context, story and partnerships. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.

McFarlane, W. R., Lukens, E., Link, B., Dushay, R., Deakins, S., Newmark, M., Dunne, E., Horen, B., & Toran, J. (1995). Multiple-family groups and psychoeducation in the treatment of schizophrenia. Archives of General Psychiatry 52, 679-687.

Northen, H. (1988). Social work with groups (2nd ed.). New York: Columbia University Press.

Shulman, Lawrence. (1999). The skills of helping individuals, families, groups, and communities (4th ed.), Itasca, IL: F.E. Peacock Publishers.

Strom-Gottfried, Kim. (1999). Social work practice: Cases, activities, and exercises. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press.

Tosland, R. W., & Rivas, R. F. (1998). An Introduction to group work practice (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Zastrow, C. (1997). Social work with groups (4th ed.). Chicago: Nelson-Hall Publishers.

Course Requirements (description of written assignments follows class schedule)

Country Manor paper 15%

Country Manor groups 15%

Paper on proposed group 20%

Presentation on proposed group 10%

Weekly reaction papers 10%

Class attendance and participation 15%

Take home exam 15%

 

DESCRIPTION OF ASSIGNMENTS

REACTION TO THE READINGS

Prior to the beginning of each class you will be expected to hand in a half page (typed, double-spaced) reaction to the assigned reading for that day. The reaction is to be more than a summary of what was covered in the text. Rather, the reaction should be your critical analysis of some aspect about what you read. The reaction can be a description of what you consider the most important concepts in the readings and why you made that selection, or your reactions to the content of the readings. You can also relate the readings to your life experience or explain how the concepts could be used. Agree or disagree with the author as long as your meaning is clear. Papers not handed in prior to class will not be accepted. The purpose of the written summary is to facilitate discussion and sharing in class. The written summary is preparation for that discussion. These reactions should follow the guidelines for written assignments. You will be graded on the presentation as well as the content of your ideas. Reaction papers will be graded on a 0 to 4 scale.

A score of 4 is clearly an outstanding piece of writing and reflection, demonstrating new and creative insights on the concepts covered.

A score of 3 is better than average work. It is well-written and demonstrates concepts learned with applications and examples.

A score of 2 is average work that reviews the concepts.

A score of 1 is below average work with errors in writing and little content.

A score of 0 is for journals not completed on time.

TAKE HOME EXAM

The take home exam will be distributed as per the schedule and will be due by the following class. The criteria for all written assignments should be followed for the take home exam.

Criteria for ALL written Assignments

All written assignments should be typed, double-spaced, have one-inch margins and be printed in a 12-point font. You should run spell check on your paper and read it aloud to yourself to ensure that you have made no omissions or that you have no redundancies or other unintended text. Be sure to cite your text and the other readings in the body of your paper using the American Psychological Association format. Also, include a complete list of references. Any written work handed in late or with errors will lose points.

The instructor is willing to read first drafts of papers and give feedback up to (but not after) five days before the due date. Late papers are not accepted unless special arrangements have been made with the instructor. Requests for an extension on papers must be submitted in writing at least 5 days before the assignment is due.

Written reports will be graded according to the following:

Depth and quality of the research 25%

Adequacy of bibliography and appropriate use of citations 5%

Discussion of implications of the information obtained 30%

Conceptual clarity of the thesis, body and conclusion 25%

Presentation of material

Organization of paper (heading, transitions, etc.) 5%

Grammar, spelling, sentence structure and punctuation 5%

APA format 5%

 

PAPER ON PROPOSED GROUP

Select a problem that social workers deal with within practice. Students in previous years have chosen anorexia, homophobia, racism, death of a parent or loved one, chemical dependency, child abuse, foster care and traumatic brain injury. Describe the problem, including what the literature says about the problem. Your review of the literature should include a minimum of six journal articles on the topic of your proposed group. This body of literature should be summarized and cited, using APA format, in your paper.

 

For your proposed group you will design a group intervention that would be appropriate for the problem you have chosen. In detail describe the intervention including how you plan to implement it. You should identify the needs of the population you propose to serve, the purpose

of the group, the composition of the group (age, and general characteristics), time and space needs, program activities, group recruitment, screening, staffing and agency context. You should also include two detailed plans for the first proposed group session and one for the last proposed group session.

 You will need to write a 4 to 6-page paper on a proposed group intervention in which you apply the knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice. The point of this paper is to show you can use the research findings in the literature and apply what you have learned in this class. The way to do that is to cite the literature and clearly state how you have applied it. The paper should address the following areas:

 

PROPOSED GROUP PAPER

What problem will your group address?

For whom is it a problem?

How widespread is the problem?

What has been done in the past by others to address this problem? Review the literature and explain what you found, including information on the effectiveness of the approaches used in dealing with the problem.

Why is a group a good way to address this problem?

Develop plans for two group sessions. One must be the first session. In detail, explain what you would do and why you would do it from the first to the last minute of the session.

Be sure to cover the following:

 

1. NEEDS

A) What do you see as the important needs of the clients served by the agency?

B) Which of these needs do you expect your group to meet?

C) Are there any other specific needs that the clients in your group have?

D) In what ways do you see a group as meeting the needs you have identified?

 

2. PURPOSE

A) What is your conception of the purpose of the group you want to form?

 

3. COMPOSITION

A) How many group members do you expect to start with? Do you have a minimum and maximum
number in mind?

B) What do you anticipate as the background characteristics of the group members?

C) What do you anticipate as the personality characteristics of the members?

D) What are the significant commonalties and differences among members that you anticipate in regard
to background and personality characteristics?

4. TIME AND SPACE

A) How many sessions are you planning for the group?

B) Will the group be open or closed?

C) What will be the frequency and duration of sessions?

D) What are the physical arrangements for the group?

E) How will you structure the space?

F) Are you planning refreshments?

 

5. PROGRAM ACTIVITIES

A) What will be the content of group meetings?

B) Will they all be group discussions, or do you plan for lectures, outside speakers, films, etc.?

C) What supplies or equipment will you need?

 

6. GROUP RECRUITMENT AND SCREENING

A) How will you recruit potential members?

B) What will you communicate about the group to referral sources?

C) What plans do you have for the screening of potential members?

D) What type of information do you want to obtain?

E) What criteria will you use to determine a client’s appropriateness for the group?

F) What alternatives will you provide for individuals who are not appropriate group members?

7. STAFFING THE GROUP

A) Do you plan to lead the group alone, or with a co-leader?

B) If you plan to work with a co-leader, what do you see as the advantages and disadvantages?

C) What steps do you think you and your co-leader need to take to work effectively together?

8. AGENCY CONTEXT

A) Whose approval will you need to obtain to start and maintain your group?

B) What structural supports are needed for the group to run smoothly? Examples:

adequate space; transportation for members; funds; statistical; credit for running

the group; supervisory time, etc.

You may also want to read Chapter 6 of Toseland, R. and Rivas, R. (1998). An introduction to group work practice. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon and page 132 of the Corey and Corey textbook for detailed information on planning a group.

Presentation on Proposed Mezzo Level Intervention

You will need to give a 30-minute presentation to the class on your proposed group paper. The first part of your presentation should cover a summary of what you found in your literature review. It should also cover the need you have identified, the purpose of your intervention, a rationale for using this particular intervention and the logistics involved in implementing your intervention. In other words, your presentation should cover the information in your paper. The second half of your presentation should include a demonstration of a shortened simulated group, using the plan for your first group session. The presentation should be well-organized and delivered which means that you should use all the public speaking skill you acquired in your symposium courses. Please see me if you would like a refresher on the skills covered in symposium. The delivery will have an impact on your grade. The simulated group activity portion of your presentation will be graded according to the following criteria:

Criteria for Evaluation of Simulated Group Session

__Introduced self

__Introduced group members

__Had each member share something about him or herself

__Dealt with feelings about being in the group

__Accepted positive and negative feelings

__Identified group members= and leader=s expectations

__Defined appropriate boundaries such as smoking or not

__Seemed aware of cultural and psychological issues

__Took care of concrete needs

__Explained the group purpose

__Located areas of commonality that will provide direction

__Recognized and dealt with resistance in the group

__Reflected upon and validated concerns expressed

__Did not minimize differences

__Introduced structure to the session

__Involved the group members in making decisions

__Offered feedback by sharing perceptions of values, feelings and ideas

__Identified common themes and defined the issue/need

__Sought further clarification about the nature of the problem

__Reached agreement on what the group will work on

__Partialized issues

__Considered alternatives for action and problem-solving

__Arranged physical structure

__Recognized strengths

__Arranged for activities that enabled the participants to shine

__Confronted the members to examine consequences of negative behavior

__Related individual issues to the group as a whole

__Encouraged individuals to relate to group as a whole

__Asked the group how members plan to take responsibility for activities

__Validated differences

__Sought areas of agreement

__Demonstrated active listening

__Demonstrated empathy

__Appeared to be genuine

__Was aware of body language

__Started and ended meeting on time

__Asked members what the session meant to them

__Asked members how they will use the gains made in the session

__Discussed the extent to which they believe that their objectives were met in the group.

__Discussed confidentiality

 

SERVICE-LEARNING PROJECT

Each student in this course is expected to work with a partner for a hands-on experience facilitating a group session in the community. Members of this class will facilitate four one-hour group sessions for senior citizens at Country Manor during the month of November. The students in this course will be asked to each pair up to facilitate these groups. The purpose of this experience is to allow CSB/SJU students to study the dynamics involved in working with groups in the community by observing the stages of group development first hand. Another goal is to provide an important service to the seniors in our community. The group sessions are intended to serve as an experiential component in the acquisition of knowledge about social work. These sessions will be videotaped or observed directly by your instructor and evaluated for the demonstration of social work skill. Part of this project involves the use of supervision and feedback appropriate to generalist practice.

The service project at Country Manor will allow students to learn about the aging process from direct interaction with seniors. Students will have an opportunity to develop skills pacing interactions to communicate effectively with seniors. This service-learning experience will also provide students with a chance to really "start where the client is at" in terms of honoring the client’s style of interaction and view of reality.

SERVICE-LEARNING PROJECT PAPER

You will need to write reflection on your experience with the service-learning sessions you facilitated with the seniors at Country Manor. This paper should be a record of what happened each time you met with the group of seniors. What did they say? Who participated? What did you say? What was the emotional content of the experience? What meaning do the events have to you? What meaning do the events have to the seniors with whom you worked? How do you interpret what happened? How will you use the information you obtained from this experience?

Describe what social work techniques and strategies you used in the group sessions. Evaluate the effectiveness of the approaches you used and what you would do differently in the future.

This paper should cover what you learned about the following areas:

Each of the stages of group development

Honoring diversity and different points of view

Recognizing strengths

Confronting members

Co-leading a group

Contracting

Surfacing a concern

Challenging members

Clarifying issues

Pointing out commonalties and differences

Dealing with difficult behavior

Using groups for problem solving

The power of mutual support

Staying focused on the contract

Opening and closing activities for each session

 

Simulated Parent Group

All class members will participate in a four-session simulated parenting group. Each session will last 60 minutes with about 40 minutes of discussion following each simulation. Two class members will serve as co-facilitators of the group, two other class members will serve as observers of the group and the rest of the class will serve as group participants. The co-facilitators will receive extra credit for the additional preparation for each class. The simulation is taken from exercise 27 in the Strom-Gottfried (1999) book, Social Work Practice: Cases, Activities, and Exercises. The forms and logs for each session are to be completed and turned in as indicated in the course schedule. Although our class will be conducted like a group, the simulation activity will give you a chance to get another view of how groups operate. You will be asked to watch for stages of group development as well as strategies and techniques used by the co-facilitators as the group progresses over the four-week period.

ATTENDANCE AND CLASS PARTICIPATION

Class participation is important because the exchange of ideas is necessary in the quest for knowledge. Active class participation facilitates learning not only for the individual participating but for the other class members as well. In order to obtain full credit for participation students need to attend all classes. Each class period a sign-in sheet will be passed around. It is your responsibility to sign this attendance sheet. Students who are not signed in will not earn any class participation points for that session. Absence from classes more than twice a semester will result in failure of the course. Any time you miss class you will need to submit a 3-page paper on the topic of the class you missed. This is not intended as punishment for missing class but rather to insure that adequate time was spent reflecting on the content covered in the missed class. Failure to write this 3-page paper will result in failure of the course.

Developing the ability to participate in a group discussion is essential in the social work field. In class students are expected at all times to demonstrate courteous listening skills. In other words, when someone is speaking, others are quiet and attentive.

Class participation will be graded as follows:

A = Excellent participation includes frequent and appropriate contributions which:

1. Pose good questions for the group

2. Use relevant reading material to answer particular questions

3. Invite others to contribute information or interpretations to the discussion

4. Build on the comments of others

5. Admit confusions, and ask for clarifications

6. Give interpretations, explanations, and opinions (sometimes personal)

B = Regular contributions that are not so integrative or interpretive such as:

1. Offering discrete facts and some new information

2. Single sentences or phrases, rather than more complex formulations

3. Less connection with other participants in conversation

 

C = Little contribution such as:

1. Speaking only a few times

2. Offering just a little information

3. Offering ideas that are vague or relatively unformulated

4. Stating unsubstantiated opinions or educated guesses.

 

D = Minimal participation such as:

1. Usually saying nothing

2. Speaking without having done the reading

3. Speaking or making noises while another person has the floor

 

F = No class participation.

Grading System

A=95-100 AB=90-94

B=85-89 BC=80-84

C=75-79 CD=70-74

D=65-69

Note: Changes in this syllabus may be necessary. Whenever possible, such changes will be negotiated with the class.

 

 

SCHEDULE OF TOPICS AND READING ASSIGNMENTS

9/6 Themes: Introduction and overview: Social work ethics, values, legal issues,

types of groups and functioning within the structure of organizations and

service delivery systems

Must Do Tonight the class will partner up for the service-learning project at Country

Manor. It is important for us to have a list of the partners in class as well as

the dates and times when each pair is available to go to Country Manor each

week during November.

Reading: The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities

Chapters 8 and 16, Groups: Process and Practice, Chapter 2

Video: Group and Group Dynamics (HM133.G78 1991 30 min.)

Recommended Reading: Linzer, N. (1999). Resolving ethical dilemmas in social

work practice. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Loewenberg, F. M., & Dolgoff, R. (1996). Ethical decisions for social

work practice (5th ed.). Itasca, IL: F. E. Peacock Publishers, Inc.

 

9/13 Theme: Working with senior citizens

Video: I ‘m Pretty Old (20 min.)

We will be meeting at Country Manor, 520 First Street NE, Sartell, MN with

Nancy Thomes and other members of the Country Manor staff. We can meet at my office at 6:30 p.m. and then drive out following each other. The phone number at Country Manor is 320-253-1920. We will spend this class session touring the facility, meeting the staff, hearing about the programs and discussing the groups you will be facilitating there the last month of the semester. We will meet in the Care Center by Nancy’s office at 7:00 p.m.

9/20 Themes: The history and theory behind generalist social work practice with mezzo systems

Reading: Groups: Process and Practice, Chapters 1 and 3

Video: Reflections on Social Work with Groups with Mel Goldstein

Recommended Reading: Chapter 2 in Tosland, R. W., & Rivas, R. F. (1998). An

introduction to group work practice (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Chapter 2 in Anderson, J. (1997). Social work with groups: A process model. White Plains, NY: Longman.

9/27 Themes: Valuing diversity and understanding of bio-psycho-social variables in work with mezzo systems

Reading: The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities,

Chapter 9

Groups: Process and Practice, Chapter 4

Video: Tale of O

Recommended Reading: Chapter 2 of Devore, W. & Schlesinger E. G. (1999).

Ethnic-sensitive social work practice (5th ed.). Needham Heights, MA:

Allyn & Bacon.

10/4 Themes: Critical thinking skills, strengths perspective and beginning work with mezzo systems

Reading: The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities

Chapters 10 and 11

Groups: Process and Practice, Chapter 5

  • Video: Problem-solving in Groups with Len Brown (HM 131.B76 1992)
  • Recommended Reading: Gibbs, L. & Gambrill, E. (1996). Critical thinking for social
  • workers. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press.
  • 10/11 Themes: The transition stage in groups and problem-solving with difficult situations
  • Reading: The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities,
  • Chapter 13

Groups: Process and Practice, Chapter 6

Video: Gazda on Groups (BF. C6 G-39 1992)

Recommended Reading: Chapter 2 in Greif, G. L., & Ephross, P. H. (Eds.).

(1997). Group work with populations at risk. New York: Oxford University Press.

Chapter 8 in Johnson, D. W. and Johnson, F. P. (2000). Joining together:

Group theory and group skills (7th ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn &

Bacon.

 

10/18 Themes: The working phase and problem-solving

Reading: The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities,

Chapter12

Groups: Process and Practice, Chapter 7

Recommended Reading: Chapter 9 in Anderson, J. (1997). Social work with groups: A process model. White Plains, NY: Longman.

 

10/25 Theme: Termination skills with mezzo systems

Reading: The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities,

Chapter 15

Groups: Process and Practice, Chapter 8

Handout for next class on multiple family groups

Recommended Reading: Chapter 10 in Northen, H. (1988). Social work with groups

(2nd ed.). New York: Columbia University Press.

 

11/1 Themes: Generalist practice with the elderly and Multiple family groups

Reading: The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families, Groups, and Communities,

Chapter 16

Groups: Process and Practice, Chapter 12

Multiple Family Groups and Psychoeducation in the Treatment of

Schizophrenia

Recommended Reading: Chapter 8 in Greif, G. L., & Ephross, P. H. (Eds.). (1997).

Group work with populations at risk. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

11/8 Themes: Working with oppressed populations.

Simulation of generalist practice with a mezzo system

Reading: Social Work Practice: Cases, Activities, and Exercises, pages 283-299.

Assignment:

Form A: Pre-Group Self-Assessment of Group Leader to be completed by each person in the class and shared in dyads prior to the first simulation. You will have time in class for this.

Form B: Observational Record to be completed by the two observers during the simulation.

Recommended Reading: Chapter 15 in Garvin, C. D. (1997). Contemporary group

work (3rd ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Chapter 11 in Brown, L. N. (1991). Groups for growth and change.

White Plains, NY: Longman.

11/15 Theme: Generalist practice with a mezzo system

Reading: Social Work Practice: Cases, Activities, and Exercises, pages 283-299.

Assignment:

Form C: Assessing Co-leader Compatibility to be completed independently by all members of the class prior to the simulation. Again time will be allowed in class for this activity.

Form D: Group Process Log to be completed by observers.

Activity: Role play in dyads of co-leading.

Recommended Reading: Chapter 2 in Locke, B., Garrison, R., and Winship, J. (1998).

Generalist social work practice: Context, story and partnerships. Pacific

Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.

11/22 Theme: Generalist practice with a mezzo system

Reading: Social Work Practice: Cases, Activities, and Exercises, pages 283-299.

Assignment:

Form E: Observational Analysis of Group Leader to be completed by observers during the simulation and by all other members after the simulation.

Form D: Group Process LogBObservational Analysis of Group Dynamics to be completed by observers during the simulation and all other members after the simulation.

Recommended Reading: Chapter 1 in Greif, G. L., & Ephross, P. H. (Eds.).

(1997). Group work with populations at risk. New York: Oxford University

Press.

 

11/29 Theme: Simulation of generalist practice with a mezzo system

Formal presentations of proposed groups

Reading: Social Work Practice: Cases, Activities, and Exercises, pages 283-299.

Assignment:

Form E: Observational Analysis of Group Leader to be completed by observers during the simulation and by all other members after the simulation.

Form D: Group Process LogBObservational Analysis of Group Dynamics to be completed by observers during the simulation and all other members after the simulation.

Recommended Reading: Chapter 15 in Tosland, R. W., & Rivas, R. F. (1998). An

introduction to group work practice (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

12/6 Formal presentations of proposed groups

Three page paper on simulated group due

12/13 Formal presentations of proposed groups

Paper on proposed group due

Exam distributed

 

CURRICULUM MODULE ON MULTIPLE-FAMILY GROUPS AND PSYCHOEDUCATION IN THE TREATMENT OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

Developed by Lynn Bye

First Activity

Goals: 1.) Students will be able to assess their current level of knowledge about schizophrenia and the treatments available. 2.) Students will become more familiar with the definition, causes and treatment options related to schizophrenia. 3.) Students will focus on the evaluation of treatment.

To introduce the research, students are given the following short pretest and informed that the pretest is not graded, but rather used for instructional purposes as a way to measure the effectiveness of the lessons. The students are also informed that they will be asked to answer the same questions on a post-test after they work through the curriculum module.

Pretest for curriculum module on Multiple-Family Groups and Psychoeducation in the Treatment of Schizophrenia

1. Define schizophrenia.

2. Describe the typical age of onset and the symptoms associated with schizophrenia.

3. Describe the treatments available for schizophrenia.

4. Define multi-family group.

5. Define psychoeducation.

6. Which treatments are most effective in the treatment of schizophrenia?

7. How do you demonstrate treatment effectiveness?

 

The pretest is designed to assess the students’ knowledge related to the identification and treatment of schizophrenia. The pretest is also intended to spark interest and get the students thinking about areas covered in the research.

Following the pretest the students are given copies of the McFarlane et al (1995) article and instructed to read it prior to the next class. The students are asked to write about: The major findings of the research, strengths of the study, limitations of the study, the compatibility between the treatments described and social work values, group dynamics (such as developing trust and a working contract), leadership skills required for multi-family groups versus the individual family groups, and the difference in how the multi-family groups and individual family groups move through the stages of group development. Students are informed that this written evaluation of the research is due two hours prior to the start of the next class to insure that everyone has time for their ideas to incubate. Students are then shown the 18 minute video Unlocking the Secrets of Schizophrenia (Films for the Humanities & Sciences, 1997) which is a documentary about the causes of schizophrenia and treatments available.

Second Activity

Goals: 1.) Students will be able to evaluate the application of the research article in social work.

2.) Students will be able to explain how schizophrenia is diagnosed and treated. 3.) Students will be able to compare and contrast multi-family groups and individual family treatment. 4.) Students will be able to critique one research article on multi-family groups.

Reviewing the research article. Students are divided into groups of three or four and asked to select a recorder so that the information generated in their discussion can be shared with the rest of the class. Each group is given a transparency to record their main ideas so that they can use an overhead projector when sharing their information with the rest of the class. Each group is assigned one of the following questions to answer.

Questions for small groups to answer

1. What makes this an important research article for a social work course?

2. What is the structure of the research?

3. What is schizophrenia, what are the symptoms and how is schizophrenia diagnosed?

4. What treatments are available for schizophrenia and what is a multiple-family

psychoeducational group?

5. What treatments are effective and what differences emerged in the study between the

multi-family psychoeducational group and the single family treatment?

6. What were the strengths of the study?

7. What were the limitations of the study?

8. Why is it important for social workers to continually evaluate their practice?

When the students come back together as a class, each group shares their ideas with the rest of the class. After each group presents their information the class is asked for comments and questions.

Third Activity

Goals: 1.) Students will be able to explain "intervening processes" in the treatment of schizophrenia and explain the level to which multi-family groups and single family groups address them.

2.) Students will have a visual and tactile knowledge of the support and power that can come from a large group working toward a common goal.

Show the video, Mental Illness in the Family (The Mental Illness Education Project, 1997), from the Bonnie Tapes which are a series of three videos documenting one family’s experience with schizophrenia. In the videos Bonnie talks about her diagnosed schizophrenia and how it has affected her life. Bonnie’s family also discusses how difficult it has been to cope with this illness, to talk to anyone about Bonnie’s illness, and how isolated and embarrassed they felt. During the first several years of Bonnie’s illness the family was not in a support group, and finally became involved with the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill. Before the tape is shown, students are asked to think about elements including the following "intervening process" described in the research article covered in the first class of this curriculum module on Multiple-Family Groups and Psychoeducation in the Treatment of Schizophrenia (McFarlane et al. 1995):

1. How education, or lack of education about schizophrenia helped or hindered the family’s ability to cope with Bonnie’s illness.

2. How stigma isolated the family.

3. The level of emotional overinvolvement on the part of the family.

4. The lack of social support for Bonnie and her family.

5. The problem-solving capacities of Bonnie and her family.

6. The way the societal and ethnic culture shaped the family’s behavior.

After viewing the Bonnie tape the students are asked to address, in writing, the six areas they were to think about during the video. The students are then put into small groups and asked to compile their observations into a master list to be brought back to the entire class where one list of observations would be recorded on the board.

Students are assigned to small groups of four, representing Bonnie’s family. One student from the class is asked to volunteer to pick up a table or other piece of furniture large enough so that one strong person could not lift it alone. Then the three other members of Bonnie’s family are recruited to help in lifting this large object. It would be all right if this small group was able to lift the object, but with great difficulty. Then the other families are asked to join in the effort. The person who initially volunteered is asked first to share how he or she felt when trying to lift the object alone, with the family, and then finally with all of the families. Next, the group serving as Bonnie’s family is asked to describe their experience when they tried to lift the table as a small group and when they had the help of all the other families. Finally, the other family groups are asked to share what it was like to help the person playing Bonnie and her family lift the table. The students then write about what they learned from this experience in relation to the research article on multi-family psychoeducational groups.

Fourth Activity

Goals: 1.) Students will be able to relate the "intervening processes" in the treatment of schizophrenia, specifically to cultural issues in multi-group or individual family treatment.

2.) Students will be able to cite examples from the video, The Whole Family, (Rosenberg, 1992) of family strengths, coping strategies and family reactions to the illness of schizophrenia. 3.) Students will be able to use the video, The Whole Family (Rosenberg, 1992), to illustrate issues that must be addressed the first session the family attends.

Students are shown the video The Whole Family (Rosenberg, 1992) which is about a 45 minute production geared toward bridging the cultural gap that often occurs in mental health settings. The video can be shown in Spanish with English subtitles. Prior to watching the video the students are asked to think about and record their observations of the same six "intervening processes" used for the viewing of the Bonnie tapes. Students are put into one of six groups with each group being assigned the job of documenting observations from the video related to one of the "intervening processes."

Fifth Activity

Goals: 1.) Students will be able to develop pictorial summaries of how the "intervening processes" are addressed by multi-family and individual family treatments. 2.) Students will be able to evaluate the effectiveness of the learning activities they have engaged in during the past four classes.

 

Students are divided into six groups with each group being assigned one of the six "intervening processes." The groups are each given a large sheet of paper with a box of markers and asked to list their observations of their intervening process on one side of the paper and then draw a picture communicating their combined observations on the other side of the paper. Each group then shares their list of observations and their picture with the rest of the class.

The students are asked to complete the post-test which is simply a re-administration of the pretest. After completion of the post-test, students evaluate the curriculum module, rating the instructional effectiveness of each of the activities over the past four class periods. The following is the curriculum module evaluation.

Curriculum Module Evaluation for the Unit on

Multi-family Groups and Psychoeducational Treatment of Schizophrenia

 

Please rate from 1 to 6 the educational effectiveness of the following activities:

 

1. No value 2. Little value 3. Some value 4. Good value 5. Considerable value 6. Excellent value

1. Pretest 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

2. Reading the research article 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

3. Writing about the findings, etc. 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

4. Class discussion of the findings, etc. 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

5. Small group on one of 9 questions 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

6. Class discussion on the 9 questions 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

7. Bonnie Tapes video 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

8. Individual analysis of Bonnie Tapes 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

9. Small group analysis of Bonnie Tapes 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

10. Class discussion of Bonnie Tapes 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

11. Furniture activity 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

12. The Whole Family video 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

15. Small group analysis of The Whole Family 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____

16. Large class discussion of The Whole Family 1____ 2____ 3____ 4____ 5____ 6____