2 Credit In-Depth Courses

In-depth, 2 credit Course descriptions

 Note that the In-depth courses do not require completion of all the foundation courses.   Course materials will include textbooks and articles from the literature.  Classroom assessment will include exams, quizzes, student presentation and papers, and participation. 

CHEM 343  Climate and Habitat Change

Along with the positive advances that result from chemistry, copious amounts of toxic and corrosive chemicals have also been produced and dispersed into the environment.  The course will address selections from different areas of environmental study that impact our climate and habitat.  Specific topics could include global warming, ozone depletion, pollution, energy production and usage and toxic waste disposal.  Approaches for remediation will be discussed.  Prerequisites: Chem 250 & 255. 

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. Gain an understanding of the impact of environmental stresses from a chemical perspective
  2. Understand how environmental samples are analyzed and draw conclusions
  3. Explore remediation strategies 

CHEM 344 A & B Environmental Chemistry A: Atmosphere  (B: Lithosphere and Hydrosphere) (pending approval Spring 14)

The behavior of chemicals in earth's natural systems is critical to the study of environmental chemistry.  Recently, copious amounts of toxic and corrosive chemicals have been produced and dispersed into the environment.   This course will address the source and fate of compounds found both in natural and polluted air or soil and water.  The reactivity of compounds and their effect on the natural cycle in the atmosphere or lithosphere and hydrosphere will also be explored.  Specific topics could include CFCs, dioxins, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), ozone, and particulate matter OR water treatment processes, pharmaceuticals and personal care products, dioxins, pesticides, polybrominated biphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and DOM.  Prerequisite: Chem 343

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate the role and transformation of chemicals in the environment.
  2. Apply fundamental chemistry principles to environmental topics. 

CHEM 345  Industrial and Engineering Processes

This course is intended to teach students the underlying principles in the operation and process development of a product for industrial scale mass production.  Topics for this course will include testing/trials, production design, and resource management. Prerequisite:  CHEM 255

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. Recognize and classify modern chemical/pharmaceutical industries in terms of products, raw materials, scale and types of transformations
  2. Describe the basic chemical principles underlying selected organic and inorganic industrial chemistry processes
  3. Develop critical skills at analyzing cost/benefit/impact of traditional industrial chemical processes including green chemistry on the society as a whole

CHEM 346  Nanomaterials

This course will focus on the fundamental principles in nanomaterials.  Topics may include structural materials, conductors, semiconductors, sensors or polymers.  The students will be presented with current synthetic techniques for the production of bulk and nanostructured materials along with analytical methodologies to physically characterize materials. Prerequisites: CHEM 315 OR 318 

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. Explain or predict how the atomic/molecular/nanoscale structure is related to important properties such as material strength, conductivity, absorption and emission of light, and chemical reactivity.
  2. Understand the typical methods for the synthesis of such materials.
  3. Understand methods for characterizing materials.
  4.  Be aware of application of materials chemistry in everyday life as well as areas of current research interest.

CHEM 347  Chemical Biology

Chemical biology will cover topics of current interest in chemical biology and will survey the way in which small molecules are used to investigate and manipulate biological systems either for a biological or chemical purpose. Specific topics may include protein design, development of unnatural biological molecules, peptide-carbohydrate interactions, combinatorial synthesis/libraries, molecular recognition, chemical genetics, biosynthesis and methods of drug discovery. Prerequisite: CHEM 251 Recommended: BIOL 121 and CHEM 315

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. Understand the role of synthetic chemistry to elucidate molecular pathways
  2. Explore biological systems using chemical informatics
  3. Understand molecular probes in studying disease biology

CHEM 348A  Molecular Design - Organic

Molecular design and catalysis are important applications of chemical reactivity concepts.  In this course, students will learn about some current methods useful in synthesis and see these methods applied in the synthesis of complex molecules. Topics may include organo-transition metal reactions, catalytic methods of enantioselective synthesis and retrosynthetic analysis.  Students will demonstrate basic proficiency in these areas and also carry out detailed analyses of total syntheses from the current literature. Pre- OR Co-requisite: CHEM 315

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. Propose syntheses of organic or biologically relevant molecules
  2. Understand methods of asymmetric control
  3. Analyze syntheses from the chemical literature

CHEM 348B  Molecular Design-Inorganic (pending approval Spring 14) 

The design and synthesis of compounds containing transition metals is an important area of modern chemistry.  In this course, students will learn the general principles of inorganic syntheses.  Case studies from the chemical literature will then be examined in areas such as the synthesis of homogenous and heterogeneous catalysts, models for active sites in metalloenzymes, and solid state compounds.  Pre- OR Co-requisite: CHEM 315

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. know general driving forces for chemical reactions involving inorganic species, including entropy and enthalpy effects, hard and soft acids and bases, use of labile ligands, and the like;
  2. assess the likelihood of success of a proposed synthesis ;
  3. understand different synthetic techniques in solid state, organometallic and coordination chemistry.

CHEM 352  Signal Transduction and Cell Communication (pending approval Spring 14) 

Living cells and organisms must respond to their environment, which allows them to adapt to a variety of external conditions.  We will use the language of chemistry (thermodynamics, kinetics, analysis, reactivity and modeling) as well as the languages of biology and mathematics, to explore systems of interactions and regulations within and between cells, and how signaling and regulation within complex biological systems leads to biological function, behavior, homeostasis, adaptation and emergence of new traits.  Especially attention will be given to the development of learning and memory.  Prerequisite: CHEM 251; Recommended: BIOL 121 and CHEM 315.

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. explain general strategies used in the regulation of biological pathways and systems and the analytical tools used to study such pathways;
  2.  describe and analyze communication pathways involved in complex processes such as learning and memory;
  3.  use web databases, mathematical programs, and the literature to model, analyze and interpret molecular interactions in biological pathways.

CHEM 353  Xenobiotic Metabolism

This course will explore biological mechanisms of activation and detoxification of xenobiotics. Topics will include oxidation/ reduction mechanisms (e.g. Cytochrome P450, Flavin Mono-Oxygenase), transferase reactions (e.g. Glutathione S-Transferase, Glycosyltransferases, Acetyltransferases), adduct formation, and repair mechanisms. Prerequisite: CHEM 315 Recommended BIOL 121.Course Objectives:

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. To understand fundamental toxicology principles and applications    
  2. To classify the different routes of toxic exposure, metabolic pathways, mechanisms of distribution within the body, and elimination processes;
  3. To understand the effects of different toxicants and stressors in terms of target effect on cells, organs and organisms

CHEM 354 Sustainable Energy (pending approval Spring 14) 

The world's energy demands are increasing, and drawbacks associated with fossil fuels have spurred the search for energy alternatives.  This course will examine alternative options such as solar energy, nuclear energy, hydrogen economy and fuel cells, ethanol production from switchgrass or algae versus corn, other biofuels and batteries.  In addition, methods for making fossil fuels more sustainable will be discussed.  Emphasis will be on the chemistry and thermodynamics of these processes with a focus not only the final energy production but the actual energy costs and environmental impacts of a given technology.  Prerequisites:  Chem 250 and Chem 255.

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. understand how energy is produced via each of the energy alternatives
  2. demonstrate that they can apply thermodynamic  and other chemical principles learned in other courses to energy production;
  3. explain the pros and cons of different energy choices.

CHEM 355  Analysis of Biomaterials

This course provides an overview of principles of bioanalytical methods and the application of modern instrumental techniques to biological systems. Particular focus will be placed on fundamental principles and analytical measurements of biomolecules, immunoassays, separations, biological mass spectrometry, microscopy and imaging. Emerging technologies such as nanotechnology-enabled biosensors, microfluidic devices and lab-on-chip may also be addressed. Error analysis, statistical treatment of data and validation of bioanalytical methods and devices are included. Prerequisite:  CHEM 255 AND CHEM 205 Recommended: BIO 121

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1.  Identify and select the most effective technique/instrument for addressing a given bio-analytical problem
  2. Understand the physical, chemical and instrumental fundamentals underlying the bioanalytical experimental design and quality control
  3.  Understand the application of advanced analytical chemistry and biochemistry in solving problems in chemistry, biochemistry, and medical science

CHEM 356 Instrumental Design and Technology (pending approval Spring 14)

This course will study the modern techniques of instrumental analysis focusing on electronics, optics, physical design and limitations of instrumentation in analytical chemistry. Upon completion of this course students will understand the theory of instrumentation for optical spectroscopy, chromatography, mass spectroscopy, and electrochemistry.  Additionally, students will be able to select an instrument based on what needs to be known about a sample.  The course will also examine the development of new technologies for instrumentation used in security devices, in the human body for medical devices, as well as in space and underwater exploration.    Prerequisite:  CHEM 255 AND CHEM 205  

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. Choose an appropriate instrumental technique when you encounter a measurement or separation problem.
  2. Process, interpret, and present instrumental data (both orally and in writing).
  3. Knowledgeably operate chemical instrumentation based on an understanding of their operating principles.

CHEM 357: Separation Science (pending approval Spring 14)

This course provides a systematic study of the modern techniques for analytical separations in terms of underlying principles, instrumentation, data interpretation and practical applications. Emphasis will be placed on gas and liquid chromatography, electrophoresis, two dimensional separations, and hyphenated techniques. Topics will be explored through a combination of scientific readings, case studies, and independent projects. Prerequisite:  CHEM 255 AND CHEM 205

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. Describe and explain the fundamental principles and instrumentation of selected analytical separation techniques
  2. Interpret data from separation methods for the purpose of method development, validation, and quantitation
  3. Select and apply appropriate separation methods for analysis of complex real-world samples

CHEM 358  Biomacromolecules

Student will explore how the unique 3D structures of proteins, RNA, nucleic acids, and glycans arise and confer on those molecules their roles in catalysis, regulation, recognition and information storage.  Students will develop an enhanced structural, thermodynamic and dynamic understandings of biomacromolecules and their biological functions and how in vivo and in vitro alternations in structure confers on them new biological properties. Prerequisite: CHEM 251 and 255; Recommended: BIOL 121

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. explain how the biological functions of proteins, nucleic acids and glycans can be understood through knowledge of the chemical and physical properties of the monomeric units and of the structures of the polymers that are formed from them;
  2.  use basic principles of thermodynamics, molecular dynamics, chemical reactivity and conformational analyses to explain and predict the properties of biomacromolecules and how their structure and properties can be changed;
  3. read recent literature and analyze data derived from experimental and theoretical studies on biomacromolecules to predict and modify theri structure, properties, and biological function.

CHEM 359  Symmetry, Orbitals and Spectroscopy

This course will involve the study and application of symmetry, group theory and quantum mechanics to spectroscopy and molecular orbital theory.  Prerequisite: CHEM 318

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. Xx
  2. Xx
  3. xx.

CHEM 361 Insights into Mechanistic Determination (pending approval Spring 14)

This course will study how chemists determine organic, inorganic and biochemical reactions.  Emphasis will be on methods for monitoring reaction rates and using experimental data to propose reaction mechanisms.  Techniques discussed could include kinetics, isotopic labeling studies, isolation of reaction intermediates, site-directed mutagenesis, computational models and/or synthesis of compounds for model studies.  Pre- OR Co-requisite: CHEM 315

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. Understand a variety of experimental techniques used by chemists for mechanism determination and the limitations of these experiments
  2. Analyze mechanistic studies of a system from primary literature sources
  3. Propose reasonable mechanisms for reactions based on experimental data and an understanding of chemical reactivity

CHEM 364 Medicinal Chemistry (pending approval Spring 14)

This course will explore the fundamental aspects and current methodologies involved in the drug discovery process.  The fundamental aspects include the physical, chemical and pharmaceutical properties of drugs. The methodologies include lead discovery strategies, structure activity relationships, structure-based and mechanism-based design methods, computational drug design methods, combinatorial chemistry techniques, and drug delivery considerations.  Application to current topics such as chemotherapy of cancer, or viral or microbial diseases will be examined.  Prerequisite: CHEM 315 Recommended BIOL 121.

Course Objectives: After completion of this course the successful students will be able to:

  1. To understand fundamental medicinal chemistry principles and applications;    
  2.  To have an appreciation of the various types of drug design approaches;
  3.  To have an understanding of covalent and non-covalent interactions between the drug targets and the small molecule drugs.