Please update your web browser or disable Compatibility View.

Spring 2016

Asian Studies Course Offerings - Spring 2016

ASIA 200:  Introduction to Asian Studies
ASP Staff, Time TBA
This colloquium course introduces the academic discipline of Asian Studies.  Through modules from across the multidisciplinary spectrum, students will acquire an interdisciplinary understanding of Asia's enduring traditions, modern transformations, and recent emergence as a central player in global affairs. 

ASP ELECTIVES

ART
Art 200: Environmental Art/Architecture (FA, cross-listed with ENVR 200A)
Richard Bresnahan, T/TH 9:35 & R 12:45,  SJU
This course focuses on a range of issues addressing art, architecture and their relationship to a sustainable environment. Through an analysis of critical theory, students will gain an understanding of the language and critical issues of art, architecture and their impact upon the environment. Through a hands-on approach, students will apply these concepts to make ceramic artwork in the SJU Pottery studio. Students will critically analyze readings, discuss examples of art and architecture and meet with artists in order to expand their understanding of the relationship between art, architecture and the environment

ART 208 Non-Western Art Survey (FA/IC)
Dr. Carol Brash, T/TH 1245, SJU
Selected survey of great architecture, sculpture and painting of Asia and other non-Western cultures. A study of artworks in relation to religion, culture, philosophy and geography of the non-Western world.

CHINESE
CHIN 112: ELEM CHINESE II
Limei Danzeisen, MWF, 10:40, CSB
Introduction to the basic elements of the Chinese language. Practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including work with grammar, pronunciation, and culture.

CHIN 212 INTERMED CHINESE II
Limei Danzeisen, MWF, 9:30, CSB
Review and continued study of grammar together with additional training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. 211 and 212 emphasize Chinese culture and civilization. Satisfactory completion of Chinese 211 fulfills the global language proficiency requirement.

CHIN 312 CHIN CONVERSATION & COMP II
Dr. Sophia Geng, T/TH, 2:40, CSB
Designed to help students solidify and further their communicative and writing ability in Chinese through contact with various written styles of modern Chinese. Advanced Chinese also provides a basic introduction to contemporary Chinese literature and culture.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
ENVR 200A  Environmental Art/Architecture
Richard Bresnahan, T/T 9:35-10:55 & R 1:00-3:55
This course focuses on a range of issues addressing art, architecture and their relationship to a sustainable environment. Through an analysis of critical theory, students will gain an understanding of the language and critical issues of art, architecture and their impact upon the environment. Through a hands-on approach, students will apply these concepts to make ceramic artwork in the SJU Pottery studio. Students will critically analyze readings, discuss examples of art and architecture and meet with artists in order to expand their understanding of the relationship between art, architecture and the environment.

GEOGRAPHY
GEOG 230: World Geography
Luke Feierabend, W, 6:15pm, CSB
A spatial frame of reference for the changing patterns of world events. Study of the relationships between physical and cultural environments and major, global issues such as population, pollution and economic change.

GLOBAL BUSINESS
GBUS 300: Global Enterprise (prerequisite GBUS 210, 220, 230, 240)   
Dr. Sanford Moskowitz, T/TH, 12:45 and 2:20, SJU
This course covers the fundamental concepts, issues, and structure of 21st century global business. It explores the historical, cultural, economic, and political underpinnings of the basic themes of, and critical actors operating within international business today. The student learns about the nature of and relationships between the major components (or systems) that make up the international business system as a whole.

HISTORY
HIST 114: East Asia before 1800 (HM)
Dr. Elisheva Perelman, MWF, 11:50, CSB
A survey of East Asia-including China, Korea, And Japan-from ancient times to the dawn of the modern era. Explores the origin and building blocks of East Asian civilization and analyzes the changes prior to 1600.

HIST 317: Revolution in Modern China (HM)
Dr. Elisheva Perelman, MWF, 2:10, CSB
This course looks at China in the 20th century and the intellectuals who attempted consciously to direct or deflect its agonizing transformation and incorporation into the "modern" world then dominated by Euro-America and the Soviet Union

JAPANESE
JAPN 112 Elementary Japanese II
Masami Limpert, MWF, 10:40, CSB
Introduction to the basic structure of the Japanese language. Practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing, with a focus on an accurate command of grammar and culturally appropriate communication skills.

JAPN 212 Intermediate Japanese Language II
Dr. Jeffrey Dubois, MWF, 1:00, CSB
Review and continued study of grammar together with additional training in speaking, listening, reading and writing.

JAPN 312 Advanced Japanese Language I
Dr. Jeffrey Dubois, MWF, 9:30, CSB
Review and continued development of grammar together with development of skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing.

JAPN 330C Nuclear Japan: Bombs/Energy/Art
Dr. Jeffrey Dubois. 11:50, CSB
This course explores literary, film, and artistic representations of Japan's nuclear past from Hiroshima to Fukushima and today. While we consider the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on one hand, and the nuclear meltdown in Fukushima following the triple disaster of March 11, 2011 on the other in their respective specificities, the class also looks for points of convergence and divergence between the understanding of atomic weapons and atomic energy in the imagination of Japan and the world. We look at witness narratives in short story and novel form; dramatic films depicting nuclear issues from Godzilla to recent dramatic and documentary films; we traverse through manga, anime, photography, painting, children's books, poetry, digital art and more to gain insight into the possibilities for expression and representation in the atomic age. At every turn, we will consider the ethical considerations and debates surrounding the use and development of both nuclear weapons and nuclear energy, thinking about these issues from comparative perspectives including environmental science, peace studies, history, and philosophy. To this extent, we'll have guest speakers visit class to discuss how nuclear issues relate to their areas of expertise.


PEACE STUDIES
PCST 333/THEO 345  Theology of Violence and Non-Violence (TU, cross-listed with Theology)
Dr. Jon Armajani, T/TH, 9:55 CSB
After providing an introduction to the beliefs, practices, and history of Islam, this course will examine several theologies of violence and non-violence in that religion. At the same time, using students' knowledge from Theology 111:  The Biblical Tradition as a basis, the course will give some attention to theologies of violence and non-violence in the Israelite, Jewish, and Christian traditions. One working definition of a theology of non-violence is that such a religious and political worldview can be comprised of a set of ideas and/or practices which encourage a person or persons (1) to act in peaceful ways and/or (2) to attempt to make changes to society using peaceful means. One working definition of a theology of violence is that such a religious and political worldview can be comprised of a set of ideas and/or practices, which encourage a religious person or persons to act in physical ways, which may be physically harmful to others, as that religious person or those persons may attempt to make changes to society.

PHILOSOPHY
PHIL 156 Asian Philosophy (HM, IC)
Dr. Charles Wright, T/TH, 8:00, SJU
We will engage in careful study of wisdom teachings from the Hindu, Buddhist, Daoist and Shinto traditions. In the Hindu tradition we will read the Bhagavad Gita. Buddhist teachings will be taken primarily from the Theravada scriptures, though there will be a brief introduction to the Mahayana tradition as well. The Taoist tradition will be approached through the Lao Tzu (a.k.a. the Tao Te Ching). We'll read an introduction to Shinto beliefs and then finish the class with a text that illustrates how the philosophy of the martial art Aikido weaves insights from all four of these traditions together. This course has a practical component requiring a minimum of one hour of meditation practice per week in addition to class meetings.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
POLS 121 Introduction to International Relations (SS, IC)
Dr. Christi Siver, MWF, 10:20, SJU
Dr. John Friend, MWF, 3:00, SJU
Analysis of the fundamental structure of the international system, including power, development, war and peace and trade viewed from a political, economic and social perspective.

POLS 223 Comparative Politics, MWF, 1:50, SJU
Dr. Christi Siver, MWF, 1:50, SJU
In this course, students will learn to understand and compare different styles of political and economic organization around the globe. We will research concepts, including democracy and nationalism, and gain greater understanding of what they mean in different contexts. We will also discuss the emergence of new forms of political and economic organization and discuss their implications for international relations. Students will also learn about social science methods commonly used in comparative politics and prepare individual research designs.

POLS 346:  Asian Politics
Dr. John Friend, T/TH, 11:10, SJU
Examination of the politics and economics of three Asian countries, namely India, China and Japan. Contemporary politics is examined through a broad study of history, cultural and social traditions, and economic conditions. The U.S. relationships with each of these nations are also studied.

THEOLOGY
THEO 345 Theologies of Violence and Non-Violence (TU, cross-listed with PCST 333)
Dr. Jon Armajani, T/TH, 9:55, CSB
After providing an introduction to the beliefs, practices, and history of Islam, this course will examine several theologies of violence and non-violence in that religion. At the same time, using students' knowledge from Theology 111:  The Biblical Tradition as a basis, the course will give some attention to theologies of violence and non-violence in the Israelite, Jewish, and Christian traditions. One working definition of a theology of non-violence is that such a religious and political worldview can be comprised of a set of ideas and/or practices which encourage a person or persons (1) to act in peaceful ways and/or (2) to attempt to make changes to society using peaceful means. One working definition of a theology of violence is that such a religious and political worldview can be comprised of a set of ideas and/or practices, which encourage a religious person or persons to act in physical ways, which may be physically harmful to others, as that religious person or those persons may attempt to make changes to society.

THEO 369C Islam and Gender (Gender, TU)
Dr. Jon Armajani, T/TH, 8:20, CSB
"This course will focus on the various ways in which relations between Muslim women and men have been appropriated, interpreted, and concretized in a variety of real-life situations throughout the early, medieval, and modern periods in Islam with a regional focus on Islam and gender in the Middle East, North Africa, South Asia, Europe, and/or North America.  This course will use gender as a primary lens of analysis for examining course content by examining the, at times static and at other times dynamic, roles of women and men in societies where Muslims are in the majority and others where they are the minority in order to gain an understanding of the relationship between appropriations of gender with respect to Islam and its corresponding cultural contexts.  The course will also give serious consideration to scholarly literature on Islam and its relationship to lesbians, gays, bigendered (i.e., bisexual), and transgendered (i.e., transexual) persons."