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Fall 2012

Asian Studies Course Offerings - Fall 2012


ART 208 NON-WESTERN ART SURVEY (FA)  (4)

Selected survey of great architecture, sculpture and painting of Asia and other non-Western cultures. A study of artworks in relation to religion, culture, philosophy and geography of the non-Western world.

CHIN 111 ELEM CHINESE I  (4)

Introduction to the basic elements of the Chinese language. Practice in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing, including work with grammar, pronunciation, and culture.

CHIN 211 INTERMED CHINESE I  (4)

Review and continued study of grammar together with additional training in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. 211 and 212 emphasize Chinese culture and civilization. Satisfactory completion of Chinese 211 fulfills the core foreign language proficiency requirement.

CHIN 311 CHIN CONVERSATION & COMP I  (4)

Designed to help students solidify and further their communicative and reading ability in Chinese through contact with various written and spoken styles of modern Chinese. Advanced Chinese also provides a basic introduction to contemporary Chinese literature and culture.

ENGL 383 POST-COLONIAL LIT (HM)  (4)

Prereq SOPHOMORE Standing & Fulfillment of HML Literature

A study of literature, partly in translation, from African, Asian and the Caribbean countries. The course focuses on the specific historical and cultural contexts in which these literatures arise. Prerequisite: fulfillment of HML literature.

GEND 290B CHINESE WOMEN IN LITERATURE  (4)

This course aims to engage students with literature by and about Chinese women and the gender, class and cultural issues that are intertwined with this intriguing topic. We will read ancient and contemporary Chinese women's writings, including poems, short novels and autobiographies. Notable female authors that we will discuss include Ban Zhao and Qingzhao Li from ancient China and Bingxin and Huiyin Lin from modern China. We will also discuss who the female writers were and the reasons they took up the pen, a practice often discouraged by the traditional patriarchal society. Furthermore, we will read portrayals of women's lives that were confined to the inner quarters of the household and the expectations imposed upon them by the society and customs of their times. Readings include tomb inscriptions for honorable ladies, biographies of deceased concubines, essays on the proper conduct of women, chapters of novels focusing on the domestic life and diaries of foreign missionaries.

GEND 360A COLONIAL VIOL:MOTHER/DAUGHTER  (4)

This course considers how the figure of the mother in colonial contexts is depicted and imagined from the perspective of the daughter. After a brief introduction of women's autobiographical writings and psychoanalytic theories of motherhood by Irigaray, Kristeva and Klein, we explore a number of questions: do the daughter's views differ depending on whether she belongs to the race of the colonizer or the colonized? Do any discrepancies exist in the daughter's mind between the representation of the mother and the idea of nation? How do heterosexual and/or interracial relationships complicate her relationship with the mother? How does sexual victimization of the daughter affect all of these? Readings include works by Kyoko Hayashi, Takako Takahashi, Taeko Kono, Hiromi Ito, Marguerite Duras, a Filipina ex-comfort woman Maria Rosa Henson, bell hooks, Toni Morrison, and Doris Lessing.

HIST 114 EAST ASIA BEFORE 1800 (HM)  (4)

A survey of East Asia-including China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam-from ancient times to the dawn of the modern era. Explores the building blocks of East Asian civilization and analyzes the changes set in motion by the region¿s contact with the West between 1600 and 1800. Every year.

HIST 117 INDIAN SUBCONT SINCE 1500 (HM)  (4)

This class will trace the history of South Asia (the Indian subcontinent) from the decline of the Mughal Empire, through the rise and decline of the British Empire, and to the period of independent nation-states. Important themes include the development of international trading networks, the effects of colonial ideology in the British context, and the lives of every-day people in South Asia during this period. We will explore the ways in which concepts of religion, gender, nationhood, and identity evolved and changed during this time.

HIST 315 ISLAM/SOUTH ASIA (HM)  (4)

IC designation pending

This class explores the rich history of the expansion and growth of Islam in the Indian subcontinent. We will take account of the role of trade and conquest in the early centuries of Islamic expansion and study the development of specifically Indian forms of Islam. The nature and impact of the Indo-Islamic empires on Indian society will be examined, as will the interaction of Muslims with non-Muslim communities in the medieval and early modern eras. The period of British colonial rule, and an analysis of the specific historical contexts that gave rise to religious nationalist movements, and how these developed according to changing relationships to national liberation movements, secularism, state administrative systems, global economic shifts, and changing social demands. Over the course of the semester we will strive to view the history of Islam and Muslim societies in both highly specific contexts and broader historical milieus.

JAPN 111 ELEM JAPANESE I  (4)

Introduction to the basic elements of the Japanese language. Practice in understanding, reading, writing, and speaking, with a sufficient number of characters. Introduction to Japanese culture.

JAPN 211 INTERMED JAPANESE I  (4)

Review and continued study of language skills. The course will emphasize Japanese culture and civilization. Satisfactory completion of this course fulfills the core foreign language proficiency.

JAPN 311 ADV JAPANESE SPEAK/READ/WRIT  (4)

Prereq JAPN 212 or 216 or permission of instructor

Review and continued development of grammar together with development of skills in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing.

 MCLT 319D TRANSNATIONAL JAPAN  (4)

This course surveys literary and visual texts in East Asia including China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Korea, but with a focus on Japan. We will examine developments of cultural materials in the national and transnational contexts across the region since the turn of the twentieth century, and also how these cultural activities expose collaborative, competitive, and conflicting relationships between them. In Part I, we will analyze what imaginative spaces have emerged from the use of pre-modern narratives in recent box-office hit movies, TV dramas, and best-selling manga. In Part II, we will investigate how national subjects have been formulated through the creation of national literatures in modern Japanese, Korean, and Chinese culture spheres in the wake of the expansion of the Japanese Empire.

MCLT 319E FOLKLORE IN CHIN/CHIN-AMER LIT  (4)

In this class, we read the English translations of popular Chinese folklore, legends, and myths. These include the tale of Mulan, the story of the Cowherd and the Weaver Goddess, and the legend of Caiji. We analyze how the stories evolved throughout history and how they were told differently in mainstream and vernacular cultures. More interestingly, we examine a number of adaptations of these stories in film, story-telling and writings by Chinese American authors, and compare the differences in terms of language, theme and function.

PHIL 156 ASIAN PHILOSOPHY (HM)  (4)

An introduction to the foundational texts of the South Asian and Chinese philosophical traditions. Texts originating in South Asia (i.e., the Indian subcontinent) will include selections from the Upanisads, the Bhagavad Gita, and early sutras from the Theravada Buddhist tradition. The Chinese traditions of Confucianism and Taoism will be approached through study of the Lao Tzu (a.k.a. the Tao Te Ching) and the Analects of Confucius.

POLS 121 INTRO TO INT'L RELATIONS (SS)  (4)

Analysis of the fundamental structure of the international system, including power, development, war and peace and trade viewed from a political, economic and social perspective. Every semester.

POLS 351 U.S. FOREIGN POLICY  (4)

Examination of United States foreign policy. The course focuses on key players as well as institutions and unofficial individuals or groups involved in the making of U.S. foreign policy. Case studies will be used to bring a 'real-life' element to the class. Every year.