Education

Department Chair: Janet Grochowski

Faculty: Tom Andert OSB, Karen Bengtson, Delbert Brobst, Jeanne Cofell, Susan Cogdill, Melisa Dick, Shannon Essler-Petty, Luke Feierabend, James Forsting, Janet Grochowski, Kristi Hendricks, Emily Hoeschen, Theresa Johnson, Michael Leach, David Leitzman, Mark Mortrude, Dale Neuschwander, Elaine Odette, Alicia Peters, Natalie Prasch, Terri Rodriguez, Lynn Schnettler, Matt Siers, Allison Spenader, Gretchen Starks-Martin, Janet Tilstra.

The education department prepares women and men for teaching careers in elementary, middle school and secondary education. Courses of study currently prepare students academically to apply for licensure in elementary education for grades K-6 with an optional endorsement in communication arts and literature for grades 5-8, mathematics for grades 5-8, science for grades 5-8, world language (French, German, or Spanish) for grades K-8, middle and secondary education in Communication Arts and Literature, Mathematics, Social Science, and Sciences for grades 5-12, as well as K-12 licensure in World Language, Art, Music, and Teaching English as a Second Language in the State of Minnesota.  These programs are approved and accredited by the Minnesota State Board of Teaching (MBOT). In addition, the Education Department is fully accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education/Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (NCATE/CAEP).

The Education Department seeks to develop teachers who are committed to high standards of learning and professional ethics. Our shared vision places reflective decision-making at the heart of the teaching process. We emphasize active decision-making which is intentional, value-based, and which reflects a rational consideration of alternatives. We believe teachers must have a firm grasp of a diverse, research-based body of knowledge. Likewise, the Benedictine values of concern for community; respect for all persons; and balance of mind, body and spirit are cornerstones of our program. Through an on-going reflective process, students incorporate their knowledge and values into their personal philosophy and practice of teaching.

Students are strongly advised to contact the Education Department during their first year to become aware of the current program requirements and devise a course plan. Programs are subject to change according to the Minnesota Board of Teaching licensure guidelines.

Admission to Teacher Education

Students must make formal application to the Education Department for admission to the Teacher Education Program. Application is made while students are enrolled in EDUC 310. Applicants are required to meet criteria specified in the online Education Department Handbook prior to acceptance by the department. In addition to these specific admission requirements, all students must complete the following:

  1. It is mandated by the Minnesota Department of Education that all students applying for acceptance into any Teacher Education Licensure Program in Minnesota must take the Minnesota Teacher Licensure Exam (MTLE-Basic Skills).  Registration materials for the test are available in the Education Department. Passing scores on the MTLE must be achieved before acceptance into the Education program and application for teacher licensure can be made in Minnesota.  Students must take the MTLE in their first year of college or during the summer prior to their sophomore year. (More information is available in the Education Department upon request.)

  2. Students requesting admission to any Education Program are assessed on their writing skills and must achieve competency at the basic level (or above). The writing assessment takes place while students are enrolled EDUC 111.

  3. Education students must maintain a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.50 or above. They must also carry a G.P.A. of 2.50 or above in the courses of the Education sequence and in their major sequence, and in their area of endorsement. In addition, a grade of C or above is required in all major/minor/endorsement courses.
  4. Students must complete the Education Department application paperwork and a structured interview. (Forms and specific directions are available from the Education Department Secretary.) The application procedure must be completed during the semester that the student is registered for EDUC 310.
  5. Students must successfully complete the speech proficiency requirement in one of the following ways prior to application to the major/minor:
    • proof of a formal high school speech course in grade 10 or above with a grade of B or higher;
    • pass the Speech Adequacy Test given by the Education Department;
    • successfully complete a college level speech course.

Additional requirements for acceptance and retention are specifically outlined in the Teacher Education Handbook which can be found on the Education Department homepage under "Student Resources". Students must follow these requirements carefully and be aware of revisions that are made each year.

Criminal Background Checks

All students applying for a Minnesota Teaching License are required to complete a criminal background check. Forms for this process are available in the Education Department. The procedure will be facilitated by the chair of the Education Department. A background check is required prior to all field experiences and student teaching and must be updated every two years, or as required by the district in which a student is placed.

Minnesota Teacher Licensure Exams (MTLE)

All graduates seeking a Minnesota teaching license must pass the MTLE tests in their area(s) of expertise. The MTLE tests include content area exams as well as Pedagogy exams appropriate for the licensure grade level.

Major in Elementary Education (K-6) with Optional 5-8 Endorsement

In addition to the major course requirements, all elementary education majors may choose to complete an academic endorsement in one of the following areas: Communication Arts and Literature, Mathematics, Science, or a language (French, German, or Spanish).  This endorsement prepares one to teach this subject in grades 5-8 for communication arts and literature, mathematics, science and K-8 for languages.  See the Education Department page for further information regarding the 5-8/K-8 endorsements.

Basic Requirements (78-87 credits)
Required Courses:
109, 111, 150, 151, 203, 212, 215, 310, 313, 315, 318, 325, 333, 334, 347, 356 (for K-8 world language endorsement only), 358 (for communication arts and literature, mathematics, and science endorsements), 359, 360 (for K-6 license only), 361 (for K-8 license), 390, MATH 121 and 180,  NATS 151 and 152, and COMM 200 or evidence of fulfillment of the speech requirement.

Minor in Secondary Education (grades 5-12) (44-46 credits)

Students who minor in secondary education for grades 5-12 take a teaching major in one of the following areas: English-language arts, mathematics, science, social science or theology. All secondary education students should see the Education Department Advisor or Chair during their first year for planning purposes.

Minor in K-12 Education (39-46 credits)

Teaching majors are also available in the following K-12 areas: art, instrumental music or vocal music, or world languages (French, German or Spanish).

*Note: 5-12 and K-12 education minors may be required to take a ninth semester, overloads and/or summer school to fulfill state of Minnesota licensure requirements. Secondary and K-12 minors are urged to contact the education department during their first year for advice on the Minnesota State licensing requirements. Additional information is in the Education Department Handbook.

K-12 Minor in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL)  (59-60 credits)

Following are the requirements for this minor:

EDUC 109, 111, 203, 212 or 213, 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 310, 359, 390, ENGL 387, and one 4 credit sociocultural/intercultural course and a 16 credit student teaching experience.  NOTE:  This course sequence does not constitute a major.

TEIL Minor, Non-Teaching (24 Total Credits). A minor is also available in Teaching English as an International Language (TEIL). This minor may be attached to any major.

Following are the courses required for this minor: EDUC 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, ENGL 387, and one sociocultural/intercultural course.

Education Course Requirements for 5-12 and K-12 Secondary Minors: (according to major)

Mathematics, Science, Social Science, Theology (5-12)
109, 111, 203, 213, 310, 352, 355, 358, 359, 362, 390, and fulfillment of speech requirement.

Biology, Chemistry or Physics (9-12)
A 9-12 license is available in Biology, Chemistry, or Physics provided a major in a subject area is attained. The Education course requirements are the same as those listed for the 5-12 license, excluding EDUC 358. Students interested in the 9-12 license should seek information from the Education Department chair to make sure all requirements are understood. 

World Languages (French, German or Spanish) (K-12)
109, 111, 203, 213, 310, 341, 352, 354, 359, 363, 390, and fulfillment of speech requirement. *WORLD LANGUAGE STUDENTS: Must demonstrate oral and written proficiency in major language for licensure.

English-Language Arts (5-12)
109, 111, 203, 213, 216, 310, 352, 355, 358, 359, 362, 390, and COMM 200.

Art K-12
109, 111, 203, 213, 310, 340, 352, 354, 359, 363, 390, and fulfillment of the speech requirement.

Instrumental and/or Vocal Music K-12
109, 111, 203, 213, 310, 321, 322, 352, 354, 359, 363, 390, and fulfillment of the speech requirement.

Courses (EDUC)

109 Chemical Use and Abuse. (1)
An introductory course to the needs and problems of school-age youth with regard to chemical use and abuse. Participants learn to identify symptoms of substance abuse and how to intervene appropriately. Offered for S/U grading only.

111 Introduction to Teaching and Learning in a Diverse World. (4)
Participants will examine trends in education, the philosophical foundations and the history of P-12 education. Additionally, they review the social problems and tension points in American education. Participants also examine the effects of their own culture on their education and begin an exploration of teachers’ awareness of diversity issues in education as well as their sensitivities toward working with diverse student populations in various settings. A service-learning component is required for the course and a teacher shadow experience is required for acceptance to the Education Program. Offered for S/U grading only.

150 Fundamentals of Music. (2)
An introductory course in which participants are actively involved in learning the elements of music (form, expression, rhythm, melody, texture, harmony) through reading, writing, composing, analyzing and performing. Piano and recorder study will be emphasized. Offered for A-F grading only.

151 Principles of Art. (2)
Course participants gain an understanding of how culture, gender, socio-economic status, and personality influences the art created by a diverse group of artists.  In addition, they acquire a visual arts vocabulary needed for critiquing and interacting intelligently and sensitively with a variety of artistic styles and art forms.  Using artistic reproductions and quality children's picture books, as well as field experiences to local/state art galleries that would enhance a K-6 art curriculum, are all part of this course.  Prerequisite: Elementary Education majors are given preference. Elementary Education majors must register in conjunction with EDUC 315. Offered for A-F grading only.

203 Human Development: Typical and Exceptional. (4)
A survey course covering the principles of human development (birth through adolescence) with an emphasis on topics of particular pertinence to those preparing for careers in teaching. Special emphasis is given to those who differ significantly in physical, mental, emotional and social development. Course content will include research, theories, stages, principles of development, and potential problems including those of students who need special classroom provisions to develop their full potential. Prerequisite: EDUC 111. Offered for A-F grading only.

212 Clinical Experience: Elementary Education. (1-2)
(Diversity Immersion Week and Local Field Experience)
Daily participation and observation in a classroom where work as a teacher aide, tutor and classroom assistant is required. Assignments focus on understanding multicultural perspectives, knowledge about diverse cultural/religious/family groups, and strategies to use when educating students in culturally diverse K-8 classrooms. Prerequisite: 111. Offered for A-F grading only.

213 Clinical Experience for K-12/5-12 Majors. (1-2)
(Diversity Immersion Week)
Observation and field experience in a K-12 or a secondary/junior high/middle school setting where work as a teacher aide, tutor and classroom assistant is required. Assignments focus on classroom management and discipline and the effects of diverse factors such as learning styles, cultural influences, family configurations and developmental characteristics of students. Prerequisite: 111. Offered for A-F grading only.

215 Literature for Children and Adolescents. (4)
Reading and analysis of literature and poetry written for children and adolescents. Focus is on the distinguishing characteristics of diverse genre, the dynamic interaction of literary elements, approaches to critical analysis, problems of censorship and developmental considerations for young audiences. Emphasis is also placed on writing and discussion processes. Literature for the course is selected to deliberately include that from non-Eurocentric cultures. Prerequisite: 111. Offered for A-F grading only.

216 Literature for Young Adults 5-12. (2)
Course participants will develop skills to use literature as a vehicle in the education of young adults. Participants will develop instructional materials for age appropriate literature – primarily in the genres of the short story and the novel. Emphasis is placed on methods and materials that appeal to a variety of learning styles and levels of comprehension. Prerequisite: 111. Offered for A-F grading only.

271 Individual Learning Project. (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the lower-division level. Permission of department chair required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

300 Structures of English for the ESL Teacher (4)
The course addresses both the structures of the English language in a format that allows pre-service teachers to not only understand how the language works, but also how these structures can be taught effectively.  The course will cover an introduction to linguistics, including English grammar rules, phonology, morphology, orthography, vocabulary, semantics and pragmatics.  This course will also cover word and sentence-level pronunciation rules in North American English.  Students will observe and analyze speech and writing samples of English language learners, and design activities and lessons that target the development of specific structures of English in a contextualized, communicative way. (Spring semesters only.) Offered for A-F grading only.

301 Teaching Literacy to English Language Learners (2)
This course provides pre-service teachers with an overview of the challenges ELLs face in classrooms with regards to literacy.  The course explores the importance of using a variety of instructional approaches to meet the needs of ELLs, and stresses the need to include teaching materials that support second language literacy development in both the ESL and mainstream classroom.  This course includes an in-depth exploration of the differences between first and second language literacy development, and the effects that limited English proficiency has on student academic success. (Fall and Spring semesters.) Offered for A-F grading only.

302 Assessing English language Learners (2)
This course addresses the importance of using appropriate methods of assessment when measuring achievement and making decisions about English Language Learners.  Some of the issues that will be explored include purposes for assessing, types of assessments, limitations of traditional assessments, creating validity and reliability in assessments, administering tests, interpreting test results, and sharing results with learners, colleagues and parents.  Students will design language and academic content assessments for use with English Language Learners. (Fall semesters.) Offered for A-F grading only.

303 Theoretical Foundations of ESL (4)
This course is designed to build on candidates' knowledge of English structures by bringing together theories of first and second language acquisition with methods and approaches to language instruction.  This writing-intensive course covers the topics of first and second language acquisition, biological and sociological factors in human learning and language acquisition, sociocultural issues related to language, motivation and policy making, as well as accepted approaches and methods to language pedagogy used in variety of ESL contexts.  Participants will research and report on the latest findings in the field of language acquisition, and analyze and critique the major pedagogical approaches in the field of ESL.  (Fall semesters.)
Prerequisites: completion or simultaneous enrollment in ENGL 387 or EDUC 300. Offered for A-F grading only.

304 ESL Methods and Materials (4)
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of practical issues pertaining to teaching ESL today, including course and lesson planning, second language teaching methods, strategies instruction, as well as hands-on experiences working with elementary, high school and post-secondary learners.  Topics covered include: information on learners of various ages and ability levels, communicative-based approaches to teaching ESL, creating and adapting lesson plans, working with technology and creating and analyzing ESL teaching materials.  A variety of clinical experiences will prepare participants to work with ESL students in any setting.  (Spring semesters.)
Prerequisites: completion or simultaneous enrollment in ENGL 387 or EDUC 300, or permission of instructor. Offered for A-F grading only.

310 Educational Psychology. (4)
This is a foundations course that provides an introduction to educational psychology.  Course content emphasizes best practices as they relate to theories of learning and their associated models of teaching as well as classroom motivation, classroom management, and assessment.  The course is primarily designed for those preparing to teach, though the content should be broad enough for anyone interested in examining the teaching/learning process. Prerequisite: 111, sophomore standing. Taken concurrently with EDUC 203. Offered for A-F grading only.

313 Teaching Physical Education K-6. (1)
Participants study techniques for organizing, planning and teaching activities for the K-6 physical education program. Clinical observations and peer and classroom teaching experience are required. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Education program. Offered for A-F grading only.

315 Art Pedagogy in Grades K-6. (2)
Course participants will learn to teach K-6 students the four essential components of a quality art program: art aesthetics, criticism, history/heritage and production. Participants engage in a field experience in grades K-6 to observe and to implement developmentally appropriate art lesson. In addition, participants create an art resource file which includes art lessons/art works completed both in and outside of class. This resource package must include a variety of art concepts, grade levels and art media. There is a heavy emphasis on addressing the concepts, issues and trends in multicultural education as it relates to the creation of a culturally diverse art curriculum. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Education program. Offered for A-F grading only.

318 Social Studies Pedagogy in Grades K-6. (4)
In this course, participants consider key historical and social studies concepts and methods of inquiry as they prepare meaningful social studies experiences for children in the elementary classroom. The Minnesota Academic Standards in History and Social Studies and the NCSS Curriculum Standards for Social Studies are used when creating developmentally appropriate lessons that accommodate elementary students' diverse needs. Students also learn to select and utilize a variety of instructional methods and resources. This course includes a weeklong practicum. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Education program. Offered for A-F grading only.

320 ESL Practicum Lab (1)
This course is designed to provide students with hands-on experiences in teaching English as a second language to late-adolescent learners with emerging academic English skills. An important component of this course is hands-on experience working with English Language Learners (ELL). To gain experience in diagnostic assessments and teaching, you will be teaching international students here at CSB/SJU. The practicum lab consists of classroom teaching, individual assessments and tutoring. You will plan and teach a lesson to a group of English Language Learners on our campus, and debrief this experience with your instructor and your peers. 

321 Music Pedagogy K-6. (3 credits)
Through active involvement, music majors learn to teach K-6 students the important elements of music: form, expression, rhythm, melody, texture and harmony, in view of the National Arts (music) Standards and MN-Academic Standards. They study the teaching methods currently in use in the U.S., including the methods of Orff, Kodaly and Dalcroze. Students compose, arrange and improvise. They are exposed to non-western music through videos, recordings and class performance. Observations and teaching experiences are required in the K-6 classroom. K-6 music idea files are required. The unique contribution of music toward meeting the special needs of children is frequently addressed. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Education program. Offered for A-F grading only. Fall semesters only.

322 Music Pedagogy 7-12. (3)
Music majors are actively involved in learning how to teach 7-12 general music and instrumental and choral performance groups. Arrangements of choral and/or instrumental compositions for appropriate for this level are required. Non-western music reports are required. Participants become familiar with the National Arts (music) Standards and MN Music Content Standards and Standards of Effective Practice for this level. Observations and teaching experience in all areas (instrumental and choral) are required as well as one teaching experience at the mid-level and secondary level. Each student must pass a guitar and piano proficiency test. The unique contribution of music toward meeting the special needs of adolescent students is frequently addressed. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Education program. Offered for A-F grading only. Spring semester only.

325 Mathematics Pedagogy K-6. (4)
Course participants explore and apply the central concepts, tools of inquiry and structure of mathematics education. Aspects of the MN Academic Standards and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards are addressed. Participants create and implement developmentally appropriate lessons which follow the outcome/assessment/curriculum/instruction in an elementary school classroom. These lessons also include accommodation for learners with diverse backgrounds and learning modes. Prerequisites: MATH 121, 180; and acceptance into the Education program. Offered for A-F grading only.

333 Music Pedagogy K-6. (2)
Through active involvement, course participants learn to teach K-6 students the important elements of music: form, expression, rhythm, melody, texture and harmony, in view of the National Arts (music) Standards and the Minnesota Academic Standards. They study the teaching methods currently in use in the U.S., with special emphasis on the methods of Orff, Kodaly and Dalcroze. They compose and improvise simple pieces. They are exposed to non-western music through videos, recordings and class performance. Two clinical observations and one teaching experience are required. Music resource card files are required. The unique contribution of music toward meeting the special needs of children will be frequently addressed. Prerequisites: 150 and acceptance into the Education program. Offered for A-F grading only.

334 Science Pedagogy K-6. (4)
Participants study the central concepts and structures of science and plan and implement age-appropriate instruction based on the Constructivist model of learning. The identification of misconceptions and ways to address them through hands-on activities are included. Science process skills and the nature of science constitute a thread running throughout the course, as well as the incorporation of multicultural and special needs issues. Aspects of the MN Academic Standards and the National Science Teaching Standards are implemented in long and short term instructional planning. Clinical observations and a teaching experience are required. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Education program, and NATS 151 and 152. Offered for A-F grading only.

335 Environmental Education Pedagogy (2 or 4)
This course is designed for individuals that are planning on teaching in the field of environmental education in formal classroom settings and/or interpretive settings, such as environmental learning centers. Some of the issues that will be explored are the incorporation of environmental education in standards based settings, the dichotomy of advocacy versus education, and the history, trends and best practices of environmental education. The relationship between the two types of environmental education settings will also be explored, including collaboration, and students will be designing and teaching environmental education curriculum based on the North American Association for Environmental Education's "Excellence in Environmental Education - Guidelines for Learning". This course will include a practicum experience.  Prerequisite: EDUC/ENVR Studies majors/minors, or permission from instructor.

340 Art Education/Methods and Materials K-12. (4)
Art majors learn to teach K-12 students the four essential components of a quality art program: art aesthetics, criticism, history/heritage and production. Participants engage in a field experience in grades K-12 to observe and to implement developmentally appropriate art lessons. In addition, participants create an art resource file which includes art lessons/art works completed both in and outside of class. This resource package must include a variety of art concepts, grade levels and art media. There is a heavy emphasis on addressing the concepts, issues and trends in multicultural education as they relate to the creation of a culturally diverse art curriculum. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Education program. Offered for A-F grading only. Offered spring semester of even years: 2010, 2012, etc.

341 World Language Pedagogy K-12. (4)
This course is designed to meet the needs of preservice teachers in K-12 world/second language education by providing an overview of child and adolescent development with corresponding implications for teaching world language K-12. Specific theories, methods and techniques for teaching second language and culture in K-12 settings will be examined and demonstrated with particular emphasis on national and professional standards for program content, teacher performance, and student proficiency assessment. Students will participate in age appropriate, communicative-oriented materials development and peer teaching scenarios. A field experience is required. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Education Department and demonstrated proficiency in the target language. Fall semesters only. Offered for A-F grading only.

347 Reading, Writing and Language Growth K-6. (4)
Course participants explore and apply the central concepts, tools of inquiry and structure of the various language arts processes. Focus is on teaching elementary-age students to read and write narrative, expository and poetic works in the English language. Participants learn instructional practices that support learning outcomes and goals for elementary students’ literacy development. Formal and authentic assessment procedures are addressed. Participants explore cultural, family, development influences on literacy acquisition and demonstrate their understanding of literacy in a field-based performance which considers knowledge of subject matter, diversity, community, and curriculum goals. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Education program. Offered for A-F grading only.

349 Introduction to Teaching and Learning in an Online Environment. (1-2)
The course has been organized into seven online modules that introduce participants to the world of online teaching and learning. As an introductory course our focus will be on adapting what we know about best classroom practices in a face-to-face setting to the unique needs of the online environment. Online community and relationship building, curriculum, teaching strategies, selecting the most appropriate digital tools, classroom management, and responding to students' diverse learning needs are among the topics that we will explore. The class includes opportunities to work with and observe teachers who teach classes online. Prerequisite: successful completion of one pedagogy course.

352 Teaching Reading in the Middle/Secondary Classroom. (1-2)
The purpose of this course is to assist pre-teachers in developing instructional strategies for integrating reading into middle and secondary (5-12) content area classrooms and interdisciplinary curriculum. Participants will investigate the Common Core Literacy Standards for 6-12 content areas as embedded within the Minnesota Academic Standards in English Language Arts K-12. They will study basic concepts of reading instruction (including phonics, phonemic awareness, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension) and apply a variety of strategies for teaching vocabulary and comprehension of informational text through their content area. In addition, participants will evaluate reading materials for text complexity and modify them based on the needs of students. This course will address Minnesota Standards of Effective Practice for Teachers as well as the following content area reading standards: 5-12 Teachers of Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Communication Arts and Literature; K-12 World Languages and Cultures, Visual Arts, and Vocal and Instrumental Music. 1.000 TO 2.000 Credit hours   Offered for A-F grading only.

354 Middle Level Literacy and Pedagogy. (2)
In this course, K-12 Education students with a major in Art, Music or World Languages will gain an understanding of the importance of literacy instruction in the middle school curriculum. The class will review developmental stages of students in the middle grades as well as the philosophical foundation for middle school. Aspects of Minnesota Academic Standards, study skills, reading and writing in the content area, pedagogical strategies, and collaboration are included. In addition, the participants will partake in a five-day practicum at a local middle school where they will observe and participate in daily activities.
(Required for K-12 Education students with a major in Art, Music or World Languages) Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Education program. Offered for A-F grading only.

355 Pedagogy in Grades 9-12. (4)
Participants learn and apply the principles of effective long and short term planning of developmentally appropriate lessons for students in grades 9-12. In addition, participants develop a variety of authentic assessment strategies for their particular disciplinary area, including aspects of the MN Standards and appropriate National Standards. A field experience is required with this course. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the Education program. Offered for English, Social Science and Mathematics in fall semesters, and for Science and Theology in spring semesters. (EDUC 355 for Theology majors covers grades 5-12.) Offered for A-F grading only.

356 World Languages in the Elementary School (K-8). (4)
This course is designed to meet the needs of the world languages teacher in the elementary classroom. Course focus is on current theories of second language acquisition, communicative methods and techniques for teaching second language and culture in a variety of K-8 settings.  These topics will be examined and demonstrated with particular emphasis on national and professional standards for program content, teacher performance, and student proficiency assessment.  Students will also learn about the principles of foreign language immersion.  A field experience requires observations and teaching in a K-8 setting, with the option to do so in a language immersion classroom. Prerequisites: World Language courses through 312 and acceptance into the Education program for Elementary majors. Offered for A-F grading only. Fall semester only.

358 Mid Level Literacy and Pedagogy in Language Arts, Mathematics, Science or Social Studies. (4)
The participants in this course will gain an understanding of the importance of literary instruction in the middle school curriculum. The class will review developmental stages of students in the middle grades as well as the philosophical foundation for middle school. Developmentally appropriate practices in middle level content areas are explored. Both Minnesota and National Standards are examined and used in planning lessons that are appropriate for the student. Curricular materials and resources are reviewed for use in teaching. A field/teaching experience at the middle school is integrated into the course. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Education program. Offered for Language Arts, Math, and Social Studies in fall and spring semesters; Science in fall only. At least 8 credits in specialty content area are required prior to registration for this course. Offered for A-F grading only.

359 Issues in Education K-12. (1)
In this capstone course, participants explore school related issues from the perspective of the “Teacher as a Decision Maker” conceptual model. Topics include both current and on-going educational issues such as classroom management, student discipline, parental involvement and diversity. Other matters are also addressed such as the Minnesota Code of Ethics for Teachers, licensure requirements and procedures as well as other legal issues relating to teaching. All participants will have an opportunity to develop a formal management plan integrating their beliefs about teaching and learning, knowledge of the setting in which they will complete their students teaching, and techniques of classroom management they have observed or acquired from their readings and discussion. Prerequisite: Taken the semester immediately before student teaching. Offered for A-F grading only.

360 Student Teaching K-6 (16)
Participants use classroom observation, information about student, and a strong knowledge base as sources for their teaching in K-6 school settings.  Furthermore, they implement aspects of the "Teacher as a Decision Maker" conceptual model as well as aspects of the Minnesota Academic Standards.  Major goals of this experience are to have student teachers recognize and accept their responsibility to children, to become reflective practitioners and to actively seek out opportunities to grow professionally.  Full-time off-campus assignments are arranged by the Director of Elementary Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all Education courses and requirements and approval of the Director of Elementary Student Teaching. Offered for S/U grading only.

361 Student Teaching K-8. (16)
Participants use classroom observation, information about students, and a strong knowledge base as sources for their teaching in K-8 school settings. Furthermore, they implement aspects of the “Teacher as a Decision Maker” conceptual model as well as aspects of the Minnesota Academic Standards. Major goals of this experience are to have student teachers recognize and accept their responsibility to children, to become reflective practitioners and to actively seek out opportunities to grow professionally. Full-time, off-campus teaching assignments are arranged by the Director of Elementary Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all Education courses and requirements and approval of the Director of Elementary Student Teaching. Offered for S/U grading only.

362 Student Teaching 5-12. (16)
Participants use classroom observation, information about students, and strong knowledge base as sources for their teaching in 5-12 school settings. Furthermore, they implement aspects of the “Teacher as a Decision Maker” conceptual model as well as aspects of the Minnesota Academic Standards. Major goals of this experience are to have student teachers recognize and accept their responsibility to children and youth, to become reflective practitioners and to actively seek out opportunities to grow professionally. Full-time, off-campus student teaching assignments are arranged by the Director of Secondary Student Teaching. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all major and Education courses and requirements and approval of the Director of Secondary Student Teaching. Offered for S/U grading only.

363 Student Teaching K-12. (16)
Participants use classroom observation, information about students, and strong knowledge base as sources for their teaching in K-12 major subject area (music, art, world languages, or ESL). Furthermore, they implement aspects of the “Teacher as a Decision Maker” conceptual model as well as aspects of the Minnesota Academic Standards. Major goals of this experience are to have student teachers recognize and accept their responsibility to children and youth, to become reflective practitioners and to actively seek out opportunities to grow professionally. Full-time, off-campus student teaching assignments are arranged by the Director of Secondary Student Teaching. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all major and Education courses and requirements and approval of the Director of Secondary Student Teaching. Offered for S/U grading.

368 International Teaching Externship (ITE) (1-2)
International Teaching Externship (ITE) is a post-student teaching international/multicultural experience in which CSB/SJU teacher candidates work with international teaching professionals as volunteer teacher aides, teaching assistants, or team-teachers in globally diverse K-12 classrooms.  The four to six week externship begins soon after the successful completion of the Minnesota-based student teaching experience.  Since this is not a student teaching experience, externship students are able to teach in a more collaborative, collegial environment while living in other countries, experiencing other cultures, and engaging in diverse educational systems. Offered for S/U grading.

371 Individual Learning Project. (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the upper-division level. Permission of department chair and completion and/or concurrent registration of 12 credits within the department required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

390 Ethics in Human Relations. (4)
This course examines some prominent ethical views of both Western and Eastern philosophical thinking. Participants explore various ethical perspectives and visions and consider their application in the demanding and ever-changing arenas of classroom, school, community, and world. The focus of ethical analysis in this course will revolve around issues of oppression, discrimination, poverty, violence and educational leadership. Students will grapple with ethical concerns existing in educational issues, this will require that they engage with ethical perspectives relevant to the larger world. Prerequisites: Junior standing and acceptance to the teacher education program. Offered for A-F grading.

397 Internship. (4-8)
Practical off-campus experience related to education. Experience is arranged by the student with the advice and approval of the internship director and department chair prior to registering for the course. Departmental moderator supervises and evaluates the experience. S/U grading only.

398 Honors Senior Essay, Research or Creative Project. (4)
Required for graduation with “Distinction in Education.” Prerequisite: HONR 396 and approval of the department chair and director of the Honors Thesis program. For further information see HONR 398.