Nursing

Department Chair: Carie Braun

Faculty: Lindsay Anderson, Jodi Berndt, Carie Braun, , Gary Gillitzer, Sigrid Hedman-Dennis, Ron Hemmesch, Georgia Hogenson, Carrie Hoover, , Nicole Lang, Rachelle Larsen, Denise Meijer, Janet Neuwirth, Kathleen Ohman, Jennifer Peterson, LuAnn Reif, Julie Strelow, Erica Timko Olson, Kathleen Twohy

The department of nursing offers a four-year program which leads to a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in nursing. The program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) and approved by the Minnesota Board of Nursing.

The goal of the nursing program is to prepare liberally educated women and men as professional nurses who can function in a variety of health care settings and to prepare students for graduate study in nursing. Graduates are eligible to take the National Council Licensing Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Students who have been convicted of a felony or gross misdemeanor may be ineligible for licensure by the Board of Nursing and early in their course of study should seek clarification of their status.

Students must meet the functional abilities for safe nursing practice including: fine and gross motor coordination, physical endurance and strength, mobility, intact senses, reading and arithmetic competence, emotional stability, critical and analytical thinking and interpersonal/communication skills. For representative examples of each, see the nursing department webpage.

Students from the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University are eligible for membership in Sigma Theta Tau-Kappa Phi Chapter, the international honor society of nursing. Faculty nominate nursing students for membership in the Kappa Phi chapter based on superior academic achievement. An active student nursing club encourages student involvement in professional and social activities.

Assessment

Continuous improvement of student learning requires conscientious, regular student and faculty participation in assessment and evaluation activities. Periodically, nursing majors’ academic achievement will be assessed using nationally standardized and classroom-based exams, scoring rubrics and performance demonstrations. Some, but not all, assessment activities are also included as part of course grades. Individual data will be given directly to the student; students should seek consultation from their instructor and/or advisor if they have concerns about individual performance. Only group data will be used for department reports.

Major (60 credits)

These requirements are for students entering CSB/SJU Fall 2011 or later with an expected graduation date on or after  Spring 2015.  Please refer to the Nursing Department website for the most current information.

Required Courses
Prerequisites: BIOL 121, 212,; CHEM 125; NUTR 125; PSYC 111; NRSG 220.
Nursing Courses: NRSG240, 201, 211, 255, 301, 311, 341, 302, 342,303, 343, 355, 356,  395.
Supporting Courses: BIOL 325, BIOL 326, PSYC 360, Healthcare Ethics, NUTR 335, Probability and Statistics.

Application to the major:
Pre-nursing students seeking admission to the major should contact the nursing department as early as possible. Application materials are available on the department webpage and are due in the Spring of the first year for the Class of 2015 and beyond.
Criteria for application to the major:

  1. Completion of all prerequisite courses with at least a grade of C in each course prior to final acceptance into the nursing major.
  2. Prerequisite-course grade point average of at least 2.75.
  3. Completion of Intent to Applyto the Major.
  4. Current physical examination including up to date immunizations and tuberculin testing.
  5. Proof of current CPR completion for the Healthcare Professional.

Applicants are considered on the basis of academic achievement as evidenced by prerequisite-course GPA. Students with a minimum 2.75 prerequisite course grade point average are eligible to apply but are not guaranteed admission. Entry into the nursing major is competitive and class size is limited.

Retention in the major:

  1. Retention in the major is contingent upon compliance with academic policies stated in the Academic Catalog, and Department of Nursing Student Handbook; all are available on-line.
  2. The nursing department retains in the major only those students who demonstrate personal and professional characteristics needed to assume the role of the registered nurse.

Special Requirements:

  • All students admitted to the major are required to have liability insurance through the college and provide their own transportation for clinical experiences. In many cases this means that the student must have individual access to a vehicle. 
  • The Nursing Department requires current CPR certification for the Health Professional. A photocopy of both sides of the signed certification card must be submitted with the application to the major. Recertification must occur prior to expiration. A photocopy of both sides of the signed recertification card must be submitted to the nursing office.
  • Students are required to be in good health as demonstrated by a physical examination clearance, current immunizations and an annual tuberculin test. The department reserves the right to require subsequent evidence of good health should circumstances warrant it. 
  • Minnesota law requires that any person who provides services that involve direct contact with patients and residents at a health care facility licensed by the Minnesota Department of Health have a criminal background study conducted by the state. An individual who is disqualified from having direct patient contact as a result of the background study, and whose disqualification is not set aside by the Commissioner of Health, will not be permitted to participate in a clinical placement in a Minnesota licensed health care facility. Failure to participate in a clinical placement required by the academic program could result in ineligibility to qualify for a degree in this program.

Minor (None)

Courses (NRSG)

NRSG 240 Core Concepts I: Primary Prevention (2)
This course is an introduction to core concepts of nursing, which includes professional standards and values, caring, levels of prevention focusing on health and wellness, teaching/learning and motivation for behavior change. The development and beginning application of therapeutic interpersonal communication skills will be addressed.

NRSG 341 Core Concepts II: Secondary Prevention (2)
This course focuses on the concepts related to secondary prevention (early identification and intervention) in the care of acutely ill individuals. The primary concepts addressed are: clinical reasoning, crisis communication and health care systems in the context of acute mental and physical illness and injury across the lifespan. Application of these concepts will occur in Clinical Nursing II.

NRSG 342 Core Concepts III: Tertiary Prevention (2)
This course focuses on the concepts related to tertiary prevention (restoring optimal level of functioning). The primary concepts addressed are: family as context, end-of-life care, rehabilitation, grief and loss, advocacy, and chronic mental and physical illnesses across the lifespan. Application of these concepts will occur in Clinical Nursing III.

NRSG 343 Core Concepts IV: Integration of Levels of Prevention in Nursing Care of Populations (2)
This course focuses on integrating the Levels of Prevention in the care of communities and populations across the lifespan. The primary concepts addressed are community as client and local/global public health. Application of these concepts will occur in Clinical Nursing IV.

NRSG 211 Integrated Pathophysiology and Pharmacology I (2)
This is part one of a two-course sequence that builds upon scientific knowledge and focuses on foundational pathophysiology, psychopathology and pharmacology concepts. The course emphasizes selected clinical models and treatments to illustrate these concepts.

NRSG 311 Integrated Pathophysiology and Pharmacology II (4)
This is part two of a two-course sequence that builds upon scientific knowledge and focuses on advanced pathophysiology, psychopathology and pharmacology concepts. The course emphasizes increasingly complex clinical models and related treatments to illustrate these concepts.

NRSG 255 Leadership I: Introduction to Transformational Leadership (2)
This course introduces selected leadership concepts, research and evidence-based practice, health literacy, and information technologies. Students are expected to develop the skills necessary for evaluating evidence to promote quality and safe nursing care and to function effectively in an interdisciplinary team.

NRSG 355 Leadership II: Leading Transformational Teams (2)
Within the context of a liberal learning environment and Catholic and Benedictine values, learners will develop professional knowledge and skills to effectively integrate designer, manager, and coordinator of care roles in professional nursing practice.

NRSG 356 Leadership III: Leading Transformational Systems (4)
Within the context of a liberal learning environment, Catholic and the Benedictine traditions and values, students will explore factors that influence the development and sustainability of complex organizational systems and their role within those systems. Students will be actively involved in policies that shape health and/or health care. Students will be expected to articulate their leadership role as an entry level professional nurse.

NRSG 201 Clinical Nursing I: Implementing Primary Prevention (6)
In the context of health promotion across the lifespan, this course provides a foundation for quality and safe nursing care through holistic assessment, technical skills, and application of professional nursing standards, evidence based practice and teaching/learning principles. This course will provide clinical experiences for application of concepts taught in the Core Concepts I, Leadership I, and Integrative Sciences I courses.

NRSG 301 Clinical Nursing II: Implementing Secondary Prevention (8)
In the context of secondary prevention across the lifespan, this course provides the application of quality and safe, culturally relevant patient centered nursing care in acute care environments. The emphasis of this course will be on the utilization of clinical reasoning models, inter/intra disciplinary collaboration, and crisis communication. This course will provide clinical experiences for application of concepts taught in all concurrent and previous courses.

NRSG 302 Clinical Nursing III: Implementing Tertiary Prevention (8)
In the context of tertiary prevention across the lifespan, this course provides the environment for application of quality and safe, culturally relevant family-centered nursing care in chronic physical and mental illness situations. The emphasis of this course will be on family assessment, genomics, chronic illness, co-morbidities, transitional care, and end-of-life care. This course will provide clinical experiences for application of concepts taught in all concurrent and previous courses.

NRSG 303 Clinical Nursing IV: Implementing Community-Based Nursing Care (8)
In the context of integrating levels of prevention across the lifespan, the emphasis of this course will be on providing quality, safe nursing with populations to affect change in the community. This course will provide clinical experiences for application of concepts taught in all concurrent and previous courses.

NRSG 397 Clinical Nursing V: Nursing Capstone (6)
Pending Curriculum Committee approval.

271 Individual Learning Project. (1-4)
Supervised reading or research at the lower-division level. Permission of department chair required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

310 Special Topics in Military Nursing. (3)
This course provides Army ROTC nurse cadets with clinical experience in a hospital setting. Students are introduced to the duties, roles, responsibilities and expectations of an Army Nurse Corps officer. Students will develop leadership and collaboration skills in a hospital environment. This course is a full time three week learning experience during summer term done under the direction of the department chair and in conjunction with an on-site nursing supervisor (BS degree or higher). Available only to ROTC nursing students who have satisfactorily completed their junior year. Summer only.

371 Individual Learning Project. (2-6)
Supervised reading or research at the upper-division level. Permission of department chair and completion and/or concurrent registration of 12 credits within the department required. Consult department for applicability towards major requirements. Not available to first-year students.

397 Internship. (1-4)
Supervised career exploration which promotes the integration of theory with practice. An opportunity to apply skills under direct supervision in an approved setting. Prerequisites: approval of the department chair and a faculty moderator; completion of pre-internship seminar.

398 Honors Senior Essay, Research or Creative Project. (4)
Required for graduation with "Distinction in Nursing." Prerequisite: HONR 396 and approval of the department chair and director of the Honors Thesis program. For further information see HONR 398.