Physical Education

Department Chair: Don Fischer

Faculty: Scott Bierscheid, Michelle Blaeser, Julie Deyak, Donald Fischer, John Gagliardi, John Harrington, Jerry Haugen, Dennis Johnson, Janna LaFountaine, Kate McNeil, Tim Miles

Exercise and physical activity play an important role in improving the quality of life of individuals, including decreasing the risk of disease and injury. The mission of the Physical Education Department is to prepare liberally educated men and women to function professionally in the fields of exercise and coaching, and to prepare students for graduate study in exercise related fields. Consistent with the Coordinate Mission of the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University, the department seeks to foster integrated learning, critical thinking, strong communication skills, exploration of age and gender related issues, and provide leadership and service opportunities for students.

The Physical Education Department carries out its mission through two curricular programs: the Coaching Certification Program and the Minor in Sports Medicine. The department also offers a course, Gender and Sport, which is cross-listed with the Gender and Women's Studies major. 

Assessment

The Physical Education Department is committed to the process of formative assessment in order to improve student learning. The assessment process employs a variety of assessment measures including (but not limited to):

  1. Embedded assessment of student learning within Physical Education Department courses
  2. Student achievement on standardized professional exams
  3. Survey of senior students and graduates
  4. Survey of Internship or Practicum site supervisors regarding student performance relative to curricular learning goals

Major (None)

Coaching Certification CSB/SJU

(10 credits and a zero credit practicum)

The coaching certification curriculum utilizes the American Sport Education Program (ASEP) model and meets the National Standards for Athletic Coaches.

Requirements:
201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 208, 209, and 351. Plus one (1) theory course (259-270). In addition, PHED XXX(B) must be satisfactorily completed. Students must have completed the Coaching Certification courses or be enrolled in the remaining required courses at the time they register for PHED XXX(B), with the exception of PHED 351 which can be completed after completing PHED XXX(B). You will need to hold current certification for First Aid/Adult CPR at the time of your employment.

Sports Medicine Minor

(24 credits with 20 credits from the required courses and 4 credits from the list of electives)

The minor curriculum in Sports Medicine is recognized by the National Strength and Conditioning Association for meeting its high standards in the area of strength and conditioning education. The curriculum draws upon and integrates concepts from a variety of disciplines including Biology, Chemistry, Nutrition, Physics and Psychology. Students apply these concepts and develop communication and critical thinking skills through a variety of "hands on" practical exercise experiences. Graduates will be prepared for national certification in personal training and strength and conditioning. In addition, the academic and practical experiences provided by the Sports Medicine curriculum will assist the student in preparing for graduate study in areas such as exercise physiology, physical therapy, and public health. It is recommended that students work closely with a faculty advisor in choosing courses to best achieve their academic goals. 

Requirements:
150, 207, 210, 257, 258, 275, 276, 277, 306, 308, 314, 357, and four additional credits from 204, 217, 307, 397, COLG 130, MATH 124, NUTR 125, PSYC 221, PSYC 311, PSYC 343, PSYC 360.

Special Requirements:
In order to graduate with a minor in Sports Medicine, the student must complete all required Sports Medicine courses with a grade of "C" or better.

Courses (PHED)

150 Introduction to Sports Medicine. (1)
This course is designed to introduce students to a broad range of careers in sports medicine—including, but not limited to athletic training, physical therapy, exercise science, personal trainer, and industry and corporate health. Students will have the opportunity to explore the various needs for the careers. This course serves as a foundation for further courses in the sports medicine minor. Open to minors and non-minors. Fall and spring.

201 Introduction to Coaching. (1)
This course provides an overview of coaching with emphasis on coaching philosophy, style, leadership and ethics. It is highly recommended that this course be taken early in the curriculum. Fall and spring.

202 Sport Psychology. (1)
This course will assist future coaches in becoming skillful communicators, motivators, and  managers of athlete behavior. Fall and spring.

203 Sport Skills. (1)
Students will discuss and apply fundamental concepts necessary for effective teaching of technical and tactical skills. Fall and Spring.

204 Sport Nutrition and Drugs. (1)
In this course, students will discuss and apply the role of various nutrients in sport performance and in determining body composition. Issues related to drug and supplement use and the coach’s role in recognizing and addressing these issues will also be discussed. Spring.

205 Sport Administration. (1)
This course will explore coaching issues related to risk and team management. Fall and Spring.

207 Sport Injuries. (2)
Students will gain a basic understanding of anatomy, while learning concepts and techniques involved in the prevention, care, treatment, evaluation and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. This course will include both practical labs and lectures. Meets the requirement for sports medicine minor. Fee of $20. Fall and spring.

208 Sports Physiology. (2)
This course will explore principles related to safe and effective exercise training. Students will apply these principles to the various stages of the training cycle in order to optimize the effects of training. Fall.

209 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries. (2)
This course will examine the role of the coach in planning for, preventing and responding to sport related injuries. This course is designed for students pursuing a Coaching Certificate. Fall and spring.

210 Sports Emergency Care. (1)
This course explores the exercise professional's role and responsibilities in preparing for, preventing, and responding to emergency situations in sport and exercise. Contains both lecture and hands-on learning components. Fall and spring.
 
217 Personal Health. (2)
This course will explore common health concerns of male and female college students. Students will evaluate their health behaviors and learn about healthy lifestyle choices.  Spring.

257 Principles of Resistance Training. (2)
Learn the principles of resistance training program design in order to promote desired acute and chronic physiological adaptations. This is primarily a lecture and discussion based course and includes some lab components. Fall.

258 Human Anatomy and Physiology for Sports Medicine. (2)
This course is primarily a lecture course covering basic human anatomy and physiology with emphasis placed on the muscular, skeletal, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems. This course is designed to provide the student a foundational understanding of anatomical and physiological terminology and concepts. Spring.

259 Theory of Coaching Ice Hockey. (1)
Advanced skills, strategy and theories of team play of ice hockey. Practice planning and drill work, game preparation, as well as game rules. Current issues and problems in the sport. Spring, alternate years.

260 Theory of Coaching Football. (1)
Advanced skills, strategy and theories of team play of football. Practice planning and drill work, game preparation, as well as game rules. Current issues and problems in the sport. Spring.

261 Theory of Coaching Basketball. (1)
Advanced skills, strategy and theories of team play of basketball. Practice planning and drill work, game preparation, as well as game rules. Fall, alternate years.

263 Theory of Coaching Track and Cross Country. (1)
Advanced skills, strategy and theories of track and field and cross country. Practice planning and drill work, meet preparation, as well as competition rules. Current issues and problems in the sport. Fall, alternate years.

264 Theory of Coaching Baseball. (1)
Advanced skills, strategy and theories of team play of baseball. Practice planning and drill work, game preparation, as well as game rules. Current issues and problems in the sport. Spring, alternate years.

267 Theory of Coaching Soccer. (1)
Advanced skills, strategy and theories of team play of soccer. Practice planning and drill work, game preparation, as well as game rules. Current issues and problems in the sport. Fall, alternate years.

269 Theory of Coaching Volleyball. (1)
Coaching of skills, strategy and theories of volleyball. Emphasis to include drill work, practices, contest planning and rules. Fall, alternate years.

270 Theory of Coaching Softball. (1)
Coaching of skills, strategy and theories of softball. Emphasis also to include drill work, practices, contest planning and rules. Spring, alternate years.

275 Techniques in Sports Medicine. (1)
In this course students will develop a greater understanding of and apply concepts presented in PHED 207 and PHED 210. Skills such as taping and wrapping of common athletic injuries, assessing vital signs and assessing body composition will be developed. Students will demonstrate minimal professional competency in specified techniques. Prerequisites: 207, 210. S/U grading only. Spring.

276 Exercise Techniques I. (1)
Students will develop knowledge of, and competency in, aerobic exercise and muscle stretching technique instruction. This is primarily a laboratory based course with students actively participating in the exercise techniques. Prerequisite: 258. S/U grading only. Spring.

277 Exercise Techniques II. (1)
Students will develop knowledge of, and competency in, resistance training and plyometric exercise technique instruction. This is primarily a laboratory based course with students actively participating in the exercise techniques. Prerequisites: 257 and 258. S/U grading only. Fall. 

306 Kinesiology. (2)
In this course the student will integrate and apply fundamental anatomical and biomechanical concepts that influence human movement. A qualitative approach to studying human movement will be emphasized. Prerequisite: 258. Fall.

307 Advanced Injury Assessment. (2)
Learning, practicing and applying advanced injury assessment techniques and skills related to trauma that can occur to the human body while participating in various sport activities. Emphasis will be placed on the hands-on assessment, evaluation and prevention of upper and lower body extremity injuries. Prerequisite: 207. Fall, alternate years.

308 Exercise Physiology. (2)
Study of body processes and exercise; efficiency of muscle work, fatigue and exercise, age, sex and body types as related to exercise; nervous control of muscle activity and the effect of exercise on the circulatory system. Prerequisite: 258. Fall.

314 Human Performance. (2)
Students will describe and evaluate human performance from an anatomical, biomechanical, and physiological perspective. Students will integrate this information through a research paper evaluating a given sport activity. Fee of $25. Prerequisites: 258, 306, 308. Spring, alternate years.

320 Gender and Sport. (2)
This course examines the role gender played and continues to play in shaping sport in our society. Students will examine topics such as Title IX, gender and social context, and the representation of female athletes in the media. This course is cross-listed with the Gender and Women's Studies major. Spring.

351 Coaching Practicum. (0)
This course is designed to provide the student with experience of coaching a sport at a high school level for an entire season. Prerequisite: completion of at least 7 credits in the Coaching Certification curriculum, including PHED 209 (or by approval of the Coaching Certification Program Supervisor). Practicum must be planned with the Coaching Certification Program Supervisor. Fall and Spring.

357 Integrative Approach to Resistance Training. (2)
In this course the student will build upon his or her knowledge of effective exercise program design by integrating fundamental concepts of sport psychology, injury prevention and rehabilitation, energy system training, age and gender related issues, and "functional" exercise techniques. Prerequisites: 207, 257, 258, and 308. Spring.

397 Sports Medicine Internship. (2-8)
Internship in an approved setting. Work experience in an area of sports medicine supervised by agency personnel and department coordinator. All internships need to be planned with the CSB/SJU internship office one semester prior to work experience.

XXX(A) Assessment of Student Learning for Sports Medicine Minor. (0)
This course is designed to assess student learning within the Sports Medicine minor and to assist in the assessment of the overall program. This assessment will include, but is not limited to, a comprehensive examination. This course is to be completed in the student’s final semester prior to graduation. S/U grading only.

XXX(B) Assessment of Student Learning for Coaching Certification. (0)
This course is designed to assess student learning within the Coaching Certification program and to assist in the assessment of the overall program. This assessment will include, but is not limited to, a comprehensive examination. This course is to be completed in the student’s final semester prior to graduation. S/U grading only.